• While many statistical models and methods are now available for network analysis, resampling network data remains a challenging problem. Cross-validation is a useful general tool for model selection and parameter tuning, but is not directly applicable to networks since splitting network nodes into groups requires deleting edges and destroys some of the network structure. Here we propose a new network resampling strategy based on splitting node pairs rather than nodes applicable to cross-validation for a wide range of network model selection tasks. We provide a theoretical justification for our method in a general setting and examples of how our method can be used in specific network model selection and parameter tuning tasks. Numerical results on simulated networks and on a citation network of statisticians show that this cross-validation approach works well for model selection.
  • The stochastic block model is widely used for detecting community structures in network data. How to test the goodness-of-fit of the model is one of the fundamental problems and has gained growing interests in recent years. In this article, we propose a novel goodness-of-fit test based on the maximum entry of the centered and re-scaled adjacency matrix for the stochastic block model. One noticeable advantage of the proposed test is that the number of communities can be allowed to grow linearly with the number of nodes ignoring a logarithmic factor. We prove that the null distribution of the test statistic converges in distribution to a Gumbel distribution, and we show that both the number of communities and the membership vector can be tested via the proposed method. Further, we show that the proposed test has asymptotic power guarantee against a class of alternatives. We also demonstrate that the proposed method can be extended to the degree-corrected stochastic block model. Both simulation studies and real-world data examples indicate that the proposed method works well.
  • Prediction algorithms typically assume the training data are independent samples, but in many modern applications samples come from individuals connected by a network. For example, in adolescent health studies of risk-taking behaviors, information on the subjects' social network is often available and plays an important role through network cohesion, the empirically observed phenomenon of friends behaving similarly. Taking cohesion into account in prediction models should allow us to improve their performance. Here we propose a network-based penalty on individual node effects to encourage similarity between predictions for linked nodes, and show that incorporating it into prediction leads to improvement over traditional models both theoretically and empirically when network cohesion is present. The penalty can be used with many loss-based prediction methods, such as regression, generalized linear models, and Cox's proportional hazard model. Applications to predicting levels of recreational activity and marijuana usage among teenagers from the AddHealth study based on both demographic covariates and friendship networks are discussed in detail and show that our approach to taking friendships into account can significantly improve predictions of behavior while providing interpretable estimates of covariate effects.
  • Link prediction in networks is typically accomplished by estimating or ranking the probabilities of edges for all pairs of nodes. In practice, especially for social networks, the data are often collected by egocentric sampling, which means selecting a subset of nodes and recording all of their edges. This sampling mechanism requires different prediction tools than the typical assumption of links missing at random. We propose a new computationally efficient link prediction algorithm for egocentrically sampled networks, which estimates the underlying probability matrix by estimating its row space. For networks created by sampling rows, our method outperforms many popular link prediction and graphon estimation techniques.
  • Estimating the number of principal components is one of the fundamental problems in many scientific fields such as signal processing (or the spiked covariance model). In this paper, for fixed $p$, we select the number of signals $k$ by the iterated logarithm penalty (ILP) and demonstrate that the ILP is consistent. Moreover, we demonstrate that any penalty term of the form $k'(p-k'/2+1/2)C_n$ may lead to an asymptotically consistent estimator under the condition that $C_n\to\infty$ and $C_n/n\to0$. We also extend our results to the case $n,p\to\infty$, with $p/n\to c>0$. In this case, for $k=o(n^{\frac{1}{3}})$, we first investigate the limiting law for the leading eigenvalues of the sample covariance matrix $S_n$ under the condition that $\lambda_k>1+\sqrt{c}$. At low SNR, since the AIC tends to underestimate the number of signals $k$, the AIC should be re-defined in this case. As a natural extension of the AIC for fixed $p$, we propose the extended AIC (EAIC), i.e., the AIC-type method with tuning parameter $\gamma=\varphi(c)=1/2+\sqrt{1/c}-\log(1+\sqrt{c})/c$, and demonstrate that the EAIC-type method, i.e., the AIC-type method with tuning parameter $\gamma>\varphi(c)$, can select the number of signals $k$ consistently. In the following two cases, (1) $p$ fixed, $n\to\infty$, (2) $n,p\to\infty$ with $p/n\to 0$, if the AIC is defined as the degeneration of the EAIC in the case $n,p\to\infty$ with $p/n\to c>0$, i.e., $\gamma=\lim_{c\rightarrow 0+0}\varphi(c)=1$, then we have essentially demonstrated that, to achieve the consistency of the AIC-type method in the above two cases, $\gamma>1$ is required. Moreover, we show that the EAIC-type method is essentially tuning-free and outperforms the well-known KN estimator proposed in Kritchman and Nadler (2008) and the BCF estimator proposed in Bai, Choi and Fujikoshi (2018). Numerical studies indicate that the proposed method works well.
  • The estimation of probabilities of network edges from the observed adjacency matrix has important applications to predicting missing links and network denoising. It has usually been addressed by estimating the graphon, a function that determines the matrix of edge probabilities, but this is ill-defined without strong assumptions on the network structure. Here we propose a novel computationally efficient method, based on neighborhood smoothing to estimate the expectation of the adjacency matrix directly, without making the structural assumptions that graphon estimation requires. The neighborhood smoothing method requires little tuning, has a competitive mean-squared error rate, and outperforms many benchmark methods on link prediction in simulated and real networks.
  • The Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm is an iterative method to maximize the log-likelihood function for parameter estimation. Previous works on the convergence analysis of the EM algorithm have established results on the asymptotic (population level) convergence rate of the algorithm. In this paper, we give a data-adaptive analysis of the sample level local convergence rate of the EM algorithm. In particular, we show that the local convergence rate of the EM algorithm is a random variable $\overline{K}_{n}$ derived from the data generating distribution, which adaptively yields the convergence rate of the EM algorithm on each finite sample data set from the same population distribution. We then give a non-asymptotic concentration bound of $\overline{K}_{n}$ on the population level optimal convergence rate $\overline{\kappa}$ of the EM algorithm, which implies that $\overline{K}_{n}\to\overline{\kappa}$ in probability as the sample size $n\to\infty$. Our theory identifies the effect of sample size on the convergence behavior of sample EM sequence, and explains a surprising phenomenon in applications of the EM algorithm, i.e. the finite sample version of the algorithm sometimes converges faster even than the population version. We apply our theory to the EM algorithm on three canonical models and obtain specific forms of the adaptive convergence theorem for each model.
  • Networks are a useful representation for data on connections between units of interests, but the observed connections are often noisy and/or include missing values. One common approach to network analysis is to treat the network as a realization from a random graph model, and estimate the underlying edge probability matrix, which is sometimes referred to as network denoising. Here we propose a generalized linear model with low rank effects to model network edges. This model can be applied to various types of networks, including directed and undirected, binary and weighted, and it can naturally utilize additional information such as node and/or edge covariates. We develop an efficient projected gradient ascent algorithm to fit the model, establish asymptotic consistency, and demonstrate empirical performance of the method on both simulated and real networks.
  • Although much progress has been made in classification with high-dimensional features \citep{Fan_Fan:2008, JGuo:2010, CaiSun:2014, PRXu:2014}, classification with ultrahigh-dimensional features, wherein the features much outnumber the sample size, defies most existing work. This paper introduces a novel and computationally feasible multivariate screening and classification method for ultrahigh-dimensional data. Leveraging inter-feature correlations, the proposed method enables detection of marginally weak and sparse signals and recovery of the true informative feature set, and achieves asymptotic optimal misclassification rates. We also show that the proposed procedure provides more powerful discovery boundaries compared to those in \citet{CaiSun:2014} and \citet{JJin:2009}. The performance of the proposed procedure is evaluated using simulation studies and demonstrated via classification of patients with different post-transplantation renal functional types.
  • While graphical models for continuous data (Gaussian graphical models) and discrete data (Ising models) have been extensively studied, there is little work on graphical models linking both continuous and discrete variables (mixed data), which are common in many scientific applications. We propose a novel graphical model for mixed data, which is simple enough to be suitable for high-dimensional data, yet flexible enough to represent all possible graph structures. We develop a computationally efficient regression-based algorithm for fitting the model by focusing on the conditional log-likelihood of each variable given the rest. The parameters have a natural group structure, and sparsity in the fitted graph is attained by incorporating a group lasso penalty, approximated by a weighted $\ell_1$ penalty for computational efficiency. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method through an extensive simulation study and apply it to a music annotation data set (CAL500), obtaining a sparse and interpretable graphical model relating the continuous features of the audio signal to categorical variables such as genre, emotions, and usage associated with particular songs. While we focus on binary discrete variables, we also show that the proposed methodology can be easily extended to general discrete variables.
  • Although asymptotic analyses of undirected network models based on degree sequences have started to appear in recent literature, it remains an open problem to study statistical properties of directed network models. In this paper, we provide for the first time a rigorous analysis of directed exponential random graph models using the in-degrees and out-degrees as sufficient statistics with binary as well as continuous weighted edges. We establish the uniform consistency and the asymptotic normality for the maximum likelihood estimate, when the number of parameters grows and only one realized observation of the graph is available. One key technique in the proofs is to approximate the inverse of the Fisher information matrix using a simple matrix with high accuracy. Numerical studies confirm our theoretical findings.
  • We consider the problem of jointly estimating a collection of graphical models for discrete data, corresponding to several categories that share some common structure. An example for such a setting is voting records of legislators on different issues, such as defense, energy, and healthcare. We develop a Markov graphical model to characterize the heterogeneous dependence structures arising from such data. The model is fitted via a joint estimation method that preserves the underlying common graph structure, but also allows for differences between the networks. The method employs a group penalty that targets the common zero interaction effects across all the networks. We apply the method to describe the internal networks of the U.S. Senate on several important issues. Our analysis reveals individual structure for each issue, distinct from the underlying well-known bipartisan structure common to all categories which we are able to extract separately. We also establish consistency of the proposed method both for parameter estimation and model selection, and evaluate its numerical performance on a number of simulated examples.
  • Many methods have been proposed for community detection in networks, but most of them do not take into account additional information on the nodes that is often available in practice. In this paper, we propose a new joint community detection criterion that uses both the network edge information and the node features to detect community structures. One advantage our method has over existing joint detection approaches is the flexibility of learning the impact of different features which may differ across communities. Another advantage is the flexibility of choosing the amount of influence the feature information has on communities. The method is asymptotically consistent under the block model with additional assumptions on the feature distributions, and performs well on simulated and real networks.
  • Community detection is a fundamental problem in network analysis, with applications in many diverse areas. The stochastic block model is a common tool for model-based community detection, and asymptotic tools for checking consistency of community detection under the block model have been recently developed. However, the block model is limited by its assumption that all nodes within a community are stochastically equivalent, and provides a poor fit to networks with hubs or highly varying node degrees within communities, which are common in practice. The degree-corrected stochastic block model was proposed to address this shortcoming and allows variation in node degrees within a community while preserving the overall block community structure. In this paper we establish general theory for checking consistency of community detection under the degree-corrected stochastic block model and compare several community detection criteria under both the standard and the degree-corrected models. We show which criteria are consistent under which models and constraints, as well as compare their relative performance in practice. We find that methods based on the degree-corrected block model, which includes the standard block model as a special case, are consistent under a wider class of models and that modularity-type methods require parameter constraints for consistency, whereas likelihood-based methods do not. On the other hand, in practice, the degree correction involves estimating many more parameters, and empirically we find it is only worth doing if the node degrees within communities are indeed highly variable. We illustrate the methods on simulated networks and on a network of political blogs.
  • Community detection is a fundamental problem in network analysis which is made more challenging by overlaps between communities which often occur in practice. Here we propose a general, flexible, and interpretable generative model for overlapping communities, which can be thought of as a generalization of the degree-corrected stochastic block model. We develop an efficient spectral algorithm for estimating the community memberships, which deals with the overlaps by employing the K-medians algorithm rather than the usual K-means for clustering in the spectral domain. We show that the algorithm is asymptotically consistent when networks are not too sparse and the overlaps between communities not too large. Numerical experiments on both simulated networks and many real social networks demonstrate that our method performs very well compared to a number of benchmark methods for overlapping community detection.
  • In this paper, we show the Wilks type of results for the Bradley-Terry model. Specifically, for some simple and composite null hypotheses of interest, we show that the likelihood ratio test statistic $\Lambda$ enjoys a chi-square approximation in the sense that $(2p)^{-1/2}(-2\log \Lambda -p)\stackrel{L}{\rightarrow}N(0,1)$ as $p$ goes to infinity, where $p$ is the corresponding degrees of freedom. Simulation studies and an application to NBA data illustrate the theoretical results.
  • The primary motivation and application in this article come from brain imaging studies on cognitive impairment in elderly subjects with brain disorders. We propose a regularized Haar wavelet-based approach for the analysis of three-dimensional brain image data in the framework of functional data analysis, which automatically takes into account the spatial information among neighboring voxels. We conduct extensive simulation studies to evaluate the prediction performance of the proposed approach and its ability to identify related regions to the outcome of interest, with the underlying assumption that only few relatively small subregions are truly predictive of the outcome of interest. We then apply the proposed approach to searching for brain subregions that are associated with cognition using PET images of patients with Alzheimer's disease, patients with mild cognitive impairment and normal controls.
  • This paper presents an asynchronous distributed algorithm to manage multiple trees for peer-to-peer streaming in a flow level model. It is assumed that videos are cut into substreams, with or without source coding, to be distributed to all nodes. The algorithm guarantees that each node receives sufficiently many substreams within delay logarithmic in the number of peers. The algorithm works by constantly updating the topology so that each substream is distributed through trees to as many nodes as possible without interference. Competition among trees for limited upload capacity is managed so that both coverage and balance are achieved. The algorithm is robust in that it efficiently eliminates cycles and maintains tree structures in a distributed way. The algorithm favors nodes with higher degree, so it not only works for live streaming and video on demand, but also in the case a few nodes with large degree act as servers and other nodes act as clients. A proof of convergence of the algorithm is given assuming instantaneous update of depth information, and for the case of a single tree it is shown that the convergence time is stochastically tightly bounded by a small constant times the log of the number of nodes. These theoretical results are complemented by simulations showing that the algorithm works well even when most assumptions for the theoretical tractability do not hold.
  • In this paper we study the effective degrees of freedom of a general class of reduced rank estimators for multivariate regression in the framework of Stein's unbiased risk estimation (SURE). We derive a finite-sample exact unbiased estimator that admits a closed-form expression in terms of the singular values or thresholded singular values of the least squares solution and hence readily computable. The results continue to hold in the high-dimensional scenario when both the predictor and response dimensions are allowed to be larger than the sample size. The derived analytical form facilitates the investigation of its theoretical properties and provides new insights into the empirical behaviors of the degrees of freedom. In particular, we examine the differences and connections between the proposed estimator and a commonly-used naive estimator, i.e., the number of free parameters. The use of the proposed estimator leads to efficient and accurate prediction risk estimation and model selection, as demonstrated by simulation studies and a data example.
  • Link prediction is one of the fundamental problems in network analysis. In many applications, notably in genetics, a partially observed network may not contain any negative examples of absent edges, which creates a difficulty for many existing supervised learning approaches. We develop a new method which treats the observed network as a sample of the true network with different sampling rates for positive and negative examples. We obtain a relative ranking of potential links by their probabilities, utilizing information on node covariates as well as on network topology. Empirically, the method performs well under many settings, including when the observed network is sparse. We apply the method to a protein-protein interaction network and a school friendship network.
  • There has been a lot of work fitting Ising models to multivariate binary data in order to understand the conditional dependency relationships between the variables. However, additional covariates are frequently recorded together with the binary data, and may influence the dependence relationships. Motivated by such a dataset on genomic instability collected from tumor samples of several types, we propose a sparse covariate dependent Ising model to study both the conditional dependency within the binary data and its relationship with the additional covariates. This results in subject-specific Ising models, where the subject's covariates influence the strength of association between the genes. As in all exploratory data analysis, interpretability of results is important, and we use L1 penalties to induce sparsity in the fitted graphs and in the number of selected covariates. Two algorithms to fit the model are proposed and compared on a set of simulated data, and asymptotic results are established. The results on the tumor dataset and their biological significance are discussed in detail.
  • This paper focuses on the stationary portion of file download in an unstructured peer-to-peer network, which typically follows for many hours after a flash crowd initiation. The model includes the case that peers can have some pieces at the time of arrival. The contribution of the paper is to identify how much help is needed from the seeds, either fixed seeds or peer seeds (which are peers remaining in the system after obtaining a complete collection) to stabilize the system. The dominant cause for instability is the missing piece syndrome, whereby one piece becomes very rare in the network. It is shown that stability can be achieved with only a small amount of help from peer seeds--even with very little help from a fixed seed, peers need dwell as peer seeds on average only long enough to upload one additional piece. The region of stability is insensitive to the piece selection policy. Network coding can substantially increase the region of stability in case a portion of the new peers arrive with randomly coded pieces.
  • Typical protocols for peer-to-peer file sharing over the Internet divide files to be shared into pieces. New peers strive to obtain a complete collection of pieces from other peers and from a seed. In this paper we investigate a problem that can occur if the seeding rate is not large enough. The problem is that, even if the statistics of the system are symmetric in the pieces, there can be symmetry breaking, with one piece becoming very rare. If peers depart after obtaining a complete collection, they can tend to leave before helping other peers receive the rare piece. Assuming that peers arrive with no pieces, there is a single seed, random peer contacts are made, random useful pieces are downloaded, and peers depart upon receiving the complete file, the system is stable if the seeding rate (in pieces per time unit) is greater than the arrival rate, and is unstable if the seeding rate is less than the arrival rate. The result persists for any piece selection policy that selects from among useful pieces, such as rarest first, and it persists with the use of network coding.
  • We propose a computationally intensive method, the random lasso method, for variable selection in linear models. The method consists of two major steps. In step 1, the lasso method is applied to many bootstrap samples, each using a set of randomly selected covariates. A measure of importance is yielded from this step for each covariate. In step 2, a similar procedure to the first step is implemented with the exception that for each bootstrap sample, a subset of covariates is randomly selected with unequal selection probabilities determined by the covariates' importance. Adaptive lasso may be used in the second step with weights determined by the importance measures. The final set of covariates and their coefficients are determined by averaging bootstrap results obtained from step 2. The proposed method alleviates some of the limitations of lasso, elastic-net and related methods noted especially in the context of microarray data analysis: it tends to remove highly correlated variables altogether or select them all, and maintains maximal flexibility in estimating their coefficients, particularly with different signs; the number of selected variables is no longer limited by the sample size; and the resulting prediction accuracy is competitive or superior compared to the alternatives. We illustrate the proposed method by extensive simulation studies. The proposed method is also applied to a Glioblastoma microarray data analysis.
  • In many organisms the expression levels of each gene are controlled by the activation levels of known "Transcription Factors" (TF). A problem of considerable interest is that of estimating the "Transcription Regulation Networks" (TRN) relating the TFs and genes. While the expression levels of genes can be observed, the activation levels of the corresponding TFs are usually unknown, greatly increasing the difficulty of the problem. Based on previous experimental work, it is often the case that partial information about the TRN is available. For example, certain TFs may be known to regulate a given gene or in other cases a connection may be predicted with a certain probability. In general, the biology of the problem indicates there will be very few connections between TFs and genes. Several methods have been proposed for estimating TRNs. However, they all suffer from problems such as unrealistic assumptions about prior knowledge of the network structure or computational limitations. We propose a new approach that can directly utilize prior information about the network structure in conjunction with observed gene expression data to estimate the TRN. Our approach uses $L_1$ penalties on the network to ensure a sparse structure. This has the advantage of being computationally efficient as well as making many fewer assumptions about the network structure. We use our methodology to construct the TRN for E. coli and show that the estimate is biologically sensible and compares favorably with previous estimates.