• Optics naturally provides us with some powerful mathematical operations. Here we reveal that a single planar interface can compute spatial differentiation to paraxial coherent beams under oblique incidence. We show that intrinsically the spatial differentiation results from the spin Hall effect of light with preparing and postselecting polarization states, in both quantum and classical levels. Since the spin Hall effect of light is a geometrically protected effect, the spatial differentiation generally accompanies light reflection and refraction and occurs at any optical interface, regardless of composition materials and incident angles. We experimentally demonstrate the generality of spatial differentiation and use such an energy-efficient method to perform ultra-fast edge detection. Compared with recent developments in spatial differentiation computing devices from metamaterials and layered structures to surface plasmonic structures and photonic crystal slab/grating, the proposed spin-optical method is generalized with a single optical interface and moreover offers a simple but powerful mechanism to vectorial-field based computation.
  • We show that in the extended modular group PGL(2,Z) there are exactly seven finite subgroups up to conjugacy; three subgroups of size 2, one subgroup each of size 3, 4, and 6, and the trivial subgroup of size 1.
  • Giant quantum oscillations of magneto-thermal conductivity amounting to two orders of magnitude of the estimation based on the Wiedemann-Franz law have been observed in the prototypical Weyl semimetal TaAs. The characteristic oscillation frequency ($F$ $\approx$ 7 T) agrees well with that confirmed for a small hole-type Fermi pocket enclosing a Weyl node. A comparative analysis of various potential scenarios suggests a significant electron-phonon coupling that strongly modulates the phonon mean free path through Landau quantization of the electronic density of states to be at the heart. Resembling the chiral-anomaly induced positive magneto-electrical conductivity, an increase of the thermal conductivity in parallel magnetic field has also been observed. Our findings pose the question whether these are characteristic also for other recently discovered topological electronic materials, calling for more intensive investigations along this line.
  • We show that every monic polynomial of degree three with complex coefficients and no repeated roots is either a (vertical and horizontal) translation of $y=x^3$ or can be composed with a linear function to obtain a Ramanujan cubic. As a result, we gain some new insights into the roots of cubic polynomials.
  • We report the discovery of superconductivity in pressurized CeRhGe3, until now the only remaining non-superconducting member of the isostructural family of non-centrosymmetric heavy-fermion compounds CeTX3 (T = Co, Rh, Ir and X = Si, Ge). Superconductivity appears in CeRhGe3 at a pressure of 19.6 GPa and the transition temperature Tc reaches a maximum value of 1.3 K at 21.5 GPa. This finding provides an opportunity to establish systematic correlations between superconductivity and materials properties within this family. Though ambient-pressure unit-cell volumes and critical pressures for superconductivity vary substantially across the series, all family members reach a maximum Tcmax at a common critical cell volume Vcrit, and Tcmax at Vcrit increases with increasing spin-orbit coupling strength of the d-electrons. These correlations show that substantial Kondo hybridization and spin-orbit coupling favor superconductivity in this family, the latter reflecting the role of broken centro-symmetry.
  • From the electrical resistivity and ac susceptibility measurements down to $T$ = 40 mK, a rich temperature-field phase diagram has been constructed for the geometrically frustrated heavy-fermion compound CePdAl. In the limit of zero temperature, the field-induced suppression of the antiferromagnetism in this compound results in a sequence of phase transitions/corssovers, rather than a single critical point, in a critical region of field 3$-$5 T. In the lowest temperature region, a power-law description of the temperature-dependent resistivity yields $A$$\cdot$$T^n$ with $n$$>$2 for all applied fields. However, a quadratic-in-temperature resistivity term can be extracted when assuming an additional electron scattering channel from magnon-like excitations, with $A$ diverging upon approaching the critical regime. Our observations suggest CePdAl to be a new playground for exotic physics arising from the competition between Kondo screening and geometrical frustration.
  • We report on magneto-transport properties of the Kondo semiconducting compound CeRu$_2$Al$_{10}$, focusing on its exotic phase below $T_0$ = 27 K. In this phase, an excess thermal conductivity $\kappa$ emerges and is gradually suppressed by magnetic field, strikingly resembling those observed in the hidden-order phase of URu$_2$Si$_2$. Our analysis indicates that low-energy magnetic excitation is the most likely origin, as was also proposed for URu$_2$Si$_2$ recently, despite the largely reduced magnetic moments. Likewise, other transport properties such as resistivity, thermopower and Nernst effect exhibit distinct features characterizing the very different charge dynamics above and below $T_0$, sharing similarities to URu$_2$Si$_2$, too. Given the exotic nature of the ordered phases in both compounds, whether a unified interpretation to all these observations exists appears to be extremely interesting.
  • The Seebeck effect describes the generation of an electric potential in a conducting solid exposed to a temperature gradient. Besides fundamental relevance in solid state physics, it serves as a key quantity to determine the performance of functional thermoelectric materials. In most cases, it is dominated by an energy-dependent electronic density of states at the Fermi level, in line with the prevalent efforts toward superior thermoelectrics through the engineering of electronic structure. Here, we demonstrate an alternative source for the Seebeck effect based on charge-carrier relaxation: A charge mobility that changes rapidly with temperature can result in a sizeable addition to the Seebeck coefficient. This new Seebeck source is demonstrated explicitly for Ni-doped CoSb3, where a dramatic mobility change occurs due to the crossover between two different charge-relaxation regimes. Our findings unveil the origin of pronounced features in the Seebeck coefficient of many other elusive materials characterized by a significant mobility mismatch. As the physical origin for the latter can vary greatly, our proposal provides a unifying framework for the understanding of a large panoply of thermoelectric phenomena. When utilized appropriately, this effect can also provide a novel route to the design of improved thermoelectric materials for applications in solid-state cooling or power generation.
  • We present a new finite element method based on the formulation introduced by Philippe G.~Ciarlet and Patrick Ciarlet, Jr. in [{\em Math. Models Methods Appl. Sci., 15 (2005), pp. 259--571}], which approximates strain tensor directly. We also show the convergence rate of strain tensor is optimal. This work is a non-trivial generalization of its two dimensional analogue in [{\em Math. Models Methods Appl. Sci., 19 (2009), pp. 1043--1064}]