• Improving the precision of measurements is a significant scientific challenge. The challenge is twofold: first, overcoming noise that limits the precision given a fixed amount of a resource, N, and second, improving the scaling of precision over the standard quantum limit (SQL), 1/\sqrt{N}, and ultimately reaching a Heisenberg scaling (HS), 1/N. Here we present and experimentally implement a new scheme for precision measurements. Our scheme is based on a probe in a mixed state with a large uncertainty, combined with a post-selection of an additional pure system, such that the precision of the estimated coupling strength between the probe and the system is enhanced. We performed a measurement of a single photon's Kerr non-linearity with an HS, where an ultra-small Kerr phase of around 6 *10^{-8} rad was observed with an unprecedented precision of around 3.6* 10^{-10} rad. Moreover, our scheme utilizes an imaginary weak-value, the Kerr non-linearity results in a shift of the mean photon number of the probe, and hence, the scheme is robust to noise originating from the self-phase modulation.
  • Quantum entanglement is the key resource for quantum information processing. Device-independent certification of entangled states is a long standing open question, which arouses the concept of self-testing. The central aim of self-testing is to certify the state and measurements of quantum systems without any knowledge of their inner workings, even when the used devices cannot be trusted. Specifically, utilizing Bell's theorem, it is possible to place a boundary on the singlet fidelity of entangled qubits. Here, beyond this rough estimation, we experimentally demonstrate a complete self-testing process for various pure bipartite entangled states up to four dimensions, by simply inspecting the correlations of the measurement outcomes. We show that this self-testing process can certify the exact form of entangled states with fidelities higher than 99.9% for all the investigated scenarios, which indicates the superior completeness and robustness of this method. Our work promotes self-testing as a practical tool for developing quantum techniques.
  • Detecting a change point is a crucial task in statistics that has been recently extended to the quantum realm. A source state generator that emits a series of single photons in a default state suffers an alteration at some point and starts to emit photons in a mutated state. The problem consists in identifying the point where the change took place. In this work, we consider a learning agent that applies Bayesian inference on experimental data to solve this problem. This learning machine adjusts the measurement over each photon according to the past experimental results finds the change position in an online fashion. Our results show that the local-detection success probability can be largely improved by using such a machine learning technique. This protocol provides a tool for improvement in many applications where a sequence of identical quantum states is required.
  • The hybrid quantum network, a universal form of quantum network which is aimed for quantum communication and distributed quantum computation, is that the quantum nodes in it are realized with different physical systems. This universal form of quantum network can combine the advantages and avoid the inherent defects of the different physical system. However, one obstacle standing in the way is the compatible photonic quantum interface. One possible solution is using non-degenerate, narrow-band, entangled photon pairs as the photonic interface. Here, for the first time, we generate nondegenrate narrow-band polarization-entangled photon pairs in cavity-enhanced spontaneous parametric down-conversion process. The bandwidths and central wavelengths of the signal and idler photons are 9 MHz at 935 nm and 9.5 MHz at 880 nm, which are compatible with trapped ion system and solid-state quantum memory system. The entanglement of the photon source is certified by quantum state tomography, showing a fidelity of 89.6% between the generated quantum state with a Bell state. Besides, a strong violation against Bell inequality with 2.36+/-0.03 further confirms the entanglement property of the photon pairs. Our method is suitable for the hybrid quantum network and will take a big step in this field.
  • Photons propagating in Laguerre-Gaussian modes have characteristic orbital angular momentums, which are fundamental optical degrees of freedom. The orbital angular momentum of light has potential application in high capacity optical communication and even in quantum information processing. In this work, we experimentally construct a ring cavity with 4 lenses and 4 mirrors that is completely degenerate for Laguerre-Gaussian modes. By measuring the transmission peaks and patterns of different modes, the ring cavity is shown to supporting more than 31 Laguerre-Gaussian modes. The constructed degenerate cavity opens a new way for using the unlimited resource of available angular momentum states simultaneously.
  • Standard weak measurement (SWM) has been proved to be a useful ingredient for measuring small longitudinal phase shifts. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 033604 (2013)]. In this letter, we show that with specfic pre-coupling and postselection, destructive interference can be observed for the two conjugated variables, i.e. time and frequency, of the meter state. Using a broad band source, this conjugated destructive interference (CDI) can be observed in a regime approximately 1 attosecond, while the related spectral shift reaches hundreds of THz. This extreme sensitivity can be used to detect tiny longitudinal phase perturbation. Combined with a frequency-domain analysis, conjugated destructive interference weak measurement (CDIWM) is proved to outperform SWM by two orders of magnitude.
  • Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) steering describes the ability of one observer to nonlocally "steer" the other observer's state through local measurements. It exhibits a unique asymmetric property, i.e., the steerability of one observer to steer the other's state could be different from each other, which can even lead to a one-way EPR steering, i.e., only one observer obtains the steerability in the two-observer case. This property is inherently different from the symmetric concepts of entanglement and Bell nonlocality and has been attracted increasing interests. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the asymmetric EPR steering for a class of two-qubit states in the case of two measurement settings. We propose a practical method to quantify the steerability. We then provide a necessary and sufficient condition for EPR steering and clearly show the case of one-way EPR steering. Our work provides a new insight on the fundamental asymmetry of quantum nonlocality and would find potential application in asymmetric quantum information processing.
  • The measurement of correlations between different degrees of freedom is an important, but in general extremely difficult task in many applications of quantum mechanics. Here, we report an all-optical experimental detection and quantification of quantum correlations between the polarization and the frequency degrees of freedom of single photons by means of local operations acting only on the polarization degree of freedom. These operations only require experimental control over an easily accessible two-dimensional subsystem, despite handling strongly mixed quantum states comprised of a continuum of orthogonal frequency states. Our experiment thus represents a photonic realization of a scheme for the local detection of quantum correlations in a truly infinite-dimensional continuous-variable system, which excludes an efficient finite-dimensional truncation.
  • Quantum repeaters are critical components for distributing entanglement over long distances in presence of unavoidable optical losses during transmission. Stimulated by Duan-Lukin-Cirac-Zoller protocol, many improved quantum-repeater protocols based on quantum memories have been proposed, which commonly focus on the entanglement-distribution rate. Among these protocols, the elimination of multi-photons (multi-photon-pairs) and the use of multimode quantum memory are demonstrated to have the ability to greatly improve the entanglement-distribution rate. Here, we demonstrate the storage of deterministic single photons emitted from a quantum dot in a polarization-maintaining solid-state quantum memory; in addition, multi-temporal-mode memory with $1$, $20$ and $100$ narrow single-photon pulses is also demonstrated. Multi-photons are eliminated, and only one photon at most is contained in each pulse. Moreover, the solid-state properties of both sub-systems make this configuration more stable and easier to be scalable. Our work will be helpful in the construction of efficient quantum repeaters based on all-solid-state devices
  • In a hybrid quantum network, linking two kinds of quantum nodes through photonic channels requires excellent matching of central frequency and bandwidth between both nodes and their interfacing photons. However, pre-existing photon sources can not fulfill this requirement. Using a novel conjoined double-cavity strategy, we report the generation of nondegenerate narrow-band photon pairs by cavity-enhanced spontaneous parametric down-conversion. The central frequencies and bandwidths of the signal and idler photons are independently set to match with trapped ions and solid-state quantum memories. With this source we achieve the bandwidths and central frequencies of 4 MHz at 935 nm and 5 MHz at 880 nm for the signal and idler photons respectively, with a normalized spectrum brightness of 4.9/s/MHz/mW. Due to the ability of being independently locked to two different wavelenghts, the conjoined double-cavity is universally suitable for hybrid quantum network consisting of various quantum nodes.
  • An upper bound between the information gain and state reversibility of weak measurement was first developed by Y. K. Cheong and S. W. Lee [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 150402 (2012)]. Their results are valid for arbitrary d-level quantum systems. In light of the commonly used qubit system in quantum information, a sharp tradeoff relation can be obtained. In this letter, this tradeoff relation is experimentally verified with polarization encoded single photons from a quantum dot. Furthermore, a complete traversal of weak measurement operators is realized, and the mapping to the least upper bound of this tradeoff relation is obtained. Our results complement the theoretical work and provide a universal ruler for the characterization of weak measurements.
  • We experimentally realized a new method for transmitting quantum information reliably through paired optical polarization-maintaining (PM) fibers. The physical setup extends the use of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, where noises are canceled through interference. This method can be viewed as an improved version of the current decohernce-free subspace (DFS) approach in fiber optics. Furthermore, the setup can be applied bidirectionally, which means that robust quantum communication can be achieved from both ends. To rigorously quantify the amount of quantum information transferred, optical fibers are analyzed with the tools developed in quantum communication theory. These results not only suggests a practical means for protecting classical and quantum information through optical fibers, but also provides a new physical platform for enriching the structure of the quantum communication theory.
  • The Kibble-Zurek mechanism (KZM) captures the key physics in the non-equilibrium dynamics of second-order phase transitions, and accurately predict the density of the topological defects formed in this process. However, despite much effort, the veracity of the central prediction of KZM, i.e., the scaling of the density production and the transit rate, is still an open question. Here, we performed an experiment, based on a nine-stage optical interferometer with an overall fidelity up to 0.975$\pm$0.008, that directly supports the central prediction of KZM in quantum non-equilibrium dynamics. In addition, our work has significantly upgraded the number of stages of the optical interferometer to nine with a high fidelity, this technique can also help to push forward the linear optical quantum simulation and computation.
  • Bohr's principle of complementarity lies at the central place of quantum mechanics, according to which the light is chosen to behave as a wave or particles, depending on some exclusive detecting devices. Later, intermediate cases are found, but the total information of the wave-like and particle-like behaviors are limited by some inequalities. One of them is Englert-Greenberger (EG) duality relation. This relation has been demonstrated by many experiments with the classical detecting devices. Here by introducing a quantum detecting device into the experiment, we find the limit of the duality relation is exceeded due to the interference between the photon's wave and particle properties. However, our further results show that this experiment still obey a generalized EG duality relation. The introducing of the quantum device causes the new phenomenon, provides an generalization of the complementarity principle, and opens new insights into our understanding of quantum mechanics.
  • Non-Markovian processes have recently become a central topic in the study of open quantum systems. We realize experimentally non-Markovian decoherence processes of single photons by combining time delay and evolution in a polarization-maintaining optical fiber. The experiment allows the identification of the process with strongest memory effects as well as the determination of a recently proposed measure for the degree of quantum non-Markovianity based on the exchange of information between the open system and its environment. Our results show that an experimental quantification of memory in quantum processes is indeed feasible which could be useful in the development of quantum memory and communication devices.
  • We investigate the violation of Leggett-Garg (LG) inequalities inquantum dots with the stationarity assumption. By comparing two types of LG inequalities, we find a better one which is easier to be tested in experiment. In addition, we show that the fine-structure splitting, background noise and temperature of quantum dots all influence the violation of LG inequalities.
  • An improvement of the scheme by Brunner and Simon [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 010405 (2010)] is proposed in order to show that quantum weak measurements can provide a method to detect ultrasmall longitudinal phase shifts, even with white light. By performing an analysis in the frequency domain, we find that the amplification effect will work as long as the spectrum is large enough, irrespective of the behavior in the time domain. As such, the previous scheme can be notably simplified for experimental implementations.
  • We present a model to derive the state of the photon pairs generated by the biexciton cascade decay of a self-assembled quantum dot, which agrees well with the experimental result. Furthermore we calculate the concurrence and entanglement sudden death is found in this system with temperature increasing, which prevents quantum dot emits entangled photon pairs at a high temperature. The relationship between the fine structure splitting and the sudden death temperature is provided too.
  • Exciton fine-structure splittings within quantum dots introduce phase differences between the two biexciton decay paths that greatly reduce the entanglement of photon pairs generated via biexciton recombination. We analyze this problem in the frequency domain and propose a practicable method to compensate the phase difference by inserting a spatial light modulator, which substantially improves the entanglement of the photon pairs without any loss.