• By means of vibrational spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT), we investigate CO adsorption on phosphorene-based systems. We find stable CO adsorption at room temperature on both phosphorene and bulk black phosphorus. The adsorption energy and vibrational spectrum have been calculated for several possible configurations of the CO overlayer. We find that the vibrational spectrum is characterized by two different C-O stretching energies. The experimental data are in good agreement with the prediction of the DFT model and unveil the unusual C-O vibrational band at 165-180 meV, activated by the lateral interactions in the CO overlayer.
  • WTe2 has attracted a great deal of attention because it exhibits extremely large and nonsaturating magnetoresistance. The underlying origin of such a giant magnetoresistance is still under debate. Utilizing laser-based angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with high energy and momentum resolutions, we reveal the complete electronic structure of WTe2. This makes it possible to determine accurately the electron and hole concentrations and their temperature dependence. We find that, with increasing the temperature, the overall electron concentration increases while the total hole concentration decreases. It indicates that the electron-hole compensation, if it exists, can only occur in a narrow temperature range, and in most of the temperature range there is an electron-hole imbalance. Our results are not consistent with the perfect electron-hole compensation picture that is commonly considered to be the cause of the unusual magnetoresistance in WTe2. We identified a flat band near the Brillouin zone center that is close to the Fermi level and exhibits a pronounced temperature dependence. Such a flat band can play an important role in dictating the transport properties of WTe2. Our results provide new insight on understanding the origin of the unusual magnetoresistance in WTe2.
  • Topological semimetals represent a new class of quantum materials hosting Dirac/Weyl fermions. The essential properties of topological fermions can be revealed by quantum oscillations. Here we present the first systematic de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) oscillation studies on the recently discovered topological Dirac nodal-line semimetal ZrSiS. From the angular dependence of dHvA oscillations, we have revealed the anisotropic Dirac bands in ZrSiS and found surprisingly strong Zeeman splitting at low magnetic fields. The Land\'e g-factor estimated from the separation of Zeeman splitting peaks is as large as 38. From the analyses of dHvA oscillations, we also revealed nearly zero effective mass and exceptionally high quantum mobility for Dirac fermions in ZrSiS. These results shed light on the nature of novel Dirac fermion physics of ZrSiS.
  • Since the discovery of large, non-saturating magnetoresistance in bulk WTe2 which allows microexfoliation, single- and few-layer WTe2 crystals have attracted increasing interests. However, as it mentioned in existing studies, WTe2 flakes appear to degrade in ambient conditions. Here we report experimental observations of saturating degradation in few-layer WTe2 through Raman spectroscopy characterization and careful monitoring of the degradation of single-, bi- and tri-layer (1L, 2L & 3L) WTe2 over long time. Raman peak intensity decreases during WTe2 degradation and 1L flakes degrade faster than 2L and 3L flakes. The relatively faster degradation in 1L WTe2 could be attributed to low energy barrier of oxygen reaction with WTe2. We further investigate the degradation mechanisms of WTe2 using XPS and AES and find that oxidation of Te and W atoms is the main reason of WTe2 degradation. In addition, we observe oxidation occurs only in the depth of 0.5nm near the surface, and the oxidized WTe2 surface could help prevent inner layers from further degradation.
  • Among iron based superconductors, the layered iron chalcogenide Fe(Te1-xSex) is structurally the simplest and has attracted considerable attentions. It has been speculated from bulk studies that nanoscale inhomogeneous superconductivity may inherently exist in this system. However, this has not been directly observed from nanoscale transport measurements. In this work, through simple micromechanical exfoliation and high precision low-energy ion milling thinning, we prepared Fe(Te0.5Se0.5) nano-flake with various thickness and systematically studied the correlation between the thickness and superconducting phase transition. Our result revealed a systematic evolution of superconducting transition with thickness. When the thickness of Fe(Te0.5Se0.5) flake is reduced down to 12nm, i.e. the characteristic length of Te/Se fluctuation, the superconducting current path and the metallicity of normal state in Fe(Te0.5Se0.5) atomic sheets is suppressed. This observation provides the first direct transport evidence for the nano-scale inhomogeneous nature of superconductivity in Fe(Te1-xSex).
  • Single crystal tungsten ditelluride (WTe2) has recently been discovered to exhibit non-saturating extreme magnetoresistance in bulk; it has also emerged as a new layered material from which atomic layer crystals can be extracted. While atomically thin WTe2 is attractive for its unique properties, little study has been conducted on single- and few-layer WTe2. Here we report the isolation of single- and few-layer WTe2, as well as fabrication and characterization of the first WTe2 suspended nanostructures. We have observed new Raman signatures of few-layer WTe2 that have been theoretically predicted but not yet reported to date, in both on-substrate and suspended WTe2 flakes. We have further probed the nanomechanical properties of suspended WTe2 structures by measuring their flexural resonances, and obtain a Young's modulus of E_Y~80GPa for the suspended WTe2 flakes. This study paves the way for future investigations and utilization of the multiple new Raman fingerprints of single- and few-layer WTe2, and for exploring mechanical control of WTe2 atomic layers.
  • The discovery of topological semimetal phase in three-dimensional (3D) systems is a new breakthrough in topological material research. Dirac nodal-line semimetal is one of the three topological semimetal phases discovered so far; it is characterized by linear band crossing along a line/loop, contrasted with the linear band crossing at discrete momentum points in 3D Dirac and Weyl semimetals. The study of nodal-line semimetal is still at initial stage; only three material systems have been verified to host nodal line fermions until now, including PbTaSe2, PtSn 4and ZrSiS. In this letter, we report evidence of nodal line fermions in ZrSiSe and ZrSiTe probed in de Haas - van Alphen (dHvA) quantum oscillations. Although ZrSiSe and ZrSiTe share similar layered structure with ZrSiS, our measurements of angular dependences of dHvA oscillations indicate the Fermi surface (FS) enclosing Dirac nodal line is of 2D character in ZiSiTe, in contrast with 3D-like FS in ZrSiSe and ZrSiS. Another important property revealed in our experiment is that the nodal line fermion density in ZrSi(S/Se) (~ 10^20-10^21 cm^-3) is much higher than the Dirac/Weyl fermion density of any known topological materials. In addition, we have demonstrated ZrSiSe and ZrSiTe single crystals can be thinned down to 2D atomic thin layers through microexfoliation, which offers a promising platform to verify the predicted 2D topological insulator in the monolayer materials with ZrSiS-type structure
  • Quantum topological materials, exemplified by topological insulators, three-dimensional Dirac semimetals and Weyl semimetals, have attracted much attention recently because of their unique electronic structure and physical properties. Very lately it is proposed that the three-dimensional Weyl semimetals can be further classified into two types. In the type I Weyl semimetals, a topologically protected linear crossing of two bands, i.e., a Weyl point, occurs at the Fermi level resulting in a point-like Fermi surface. In the type II Weyl semimetals, the Weyl point emerges from a contact of an electron and a hole pocket at the boundary resulting in a highly tilted Weyl cone. In type II Weyl semimetals, the Lorentz invariance is violated and a fundamentally new kind of Weyl Fermions is produced that leads to new physical properties. WTe2 is interesting because it exhibits anomalously large magnetoresistance. It has ignited a new excitement because it is proposed to be the first candidate of realizing type II Weyl Fermions. Here we report our angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) evidence on identifying the type II Weyl Fermion state in WTe2. By utilizing our latest generation laser-based ARPES system with superior energy and momentum resolutions, we have revealed a full picture on the electronic structure of WTe2. Clear surface state has been identified and its connection with the bulk electronic states in the momentum and energy space shows a good agreement with the calculated band structures with the type II Weyl states. Our results provide spectroscopic evidence on the observation of type II Weyl states in WTe2. It has laid a foundation for further exploration of novel phenomena and physical properties in the type II Weyl semimetals.
  • As the only non-carbon elemental layered allotrope, few-layer black phosphorus or phosphorene has emerged as a novel two-dimensional (2D) semiconductor with both high bulk mobility and a band gap. Here we report fabrication and transport measurements of phosphorene-hexagonal BN (hBN) heterostructures with one-dimensional (1D) edge contacts. These transistors are stable in ambient conditions for >300 hours, and display ambipolar behavior, a gate-dependent metal-insulator transition, and mobility up to 4000 $cm^2$/Vs. At low temperatures, we observe gate-tunable Shubnikov de Haas (SdH) magneto-oscillations and Zeeman splitting in magnetic field with an estimated g-factor ~2. The cyclotron mass of few-layer phosphorene holes is determined to increase from 0.25 to 0.31 $m_e$ as the Fermi level moves towards the valence band edge. Our results underscore the potential of few-layer phosphorene (FLP) as both a platform for novel 2D physics and an electronic material for semiconductor applications.
  • Semiconducting two-dimensional transition metal chalcogenide crystals have been regarded as the promising candidate for the future generation of transistor in modern electronics. However, how to fabricate those crystals into practical devices with acceptable performance still remains as a challenge. Employing tungsten disulfide multilayer thin crystals, we demonstrate that using gold as the only contact metal and choosing appropriate thickness of the crystal, high performance transistor with on/off ratio of $10^{8}$ and mobility up to $234\:cm^{2}V^{-1}s^{-1}$ at room temperature can be realized in a simple device structure. Further low temperature study revealed that the high performance of our device is caused by the minimized Schottky barrier at the contact and the existence of a shallow impurity level around 80 meV right below the conduction band edge. From the analysis on temperature dependence of field-effect mobility, we conclude that strongly suppressed phonon scattering and relatively low charge impurity density are the key factors leading to the high mobility of our tungsten disulfide devices.
  • Controlling electronic population through chemical doping is one way to tip the balance between competing phases in materials with strong electronic correlations. Vanadium dioxide exhibits a first-order phase transition at around 338 K between a high temperature, tetragonal, metallic state (T) and a low temperature, monoclinic, insulating state (M1), driven by electron-electron and electron-lattice interactions. Intercalation of VO2 with atomic hydrogen has been demonstrated, with evidence that this doping suppresses the transition. However, the detailed effects of intercalated H on the crystal and electronic structure of the resulting hydride have not been previously reported. Here we present synchrotron and neutron diffraction studies of this material system, mapping out the structural phase diagram as a function of temperature and hydrogen content. In addition to the original T and M1 phases, we find two orthorhombic phases, O1 and O2, which are stabilized at higher hydrogen content. We present density functional calculations that confirm the metallicity of these states and discuss the physical basis by which hydrogen stabilizes conducting phases, in the context of the metal-insulator transition.
  • We benchmark and analyze the error of energy conservation (EC) scheme for Particle in cell/Monte-Carlo Couple (PIC/MCC) algorithms by a radio frequency discharging simulation. The plasma heating behaviors and electron distributing functions obtained by 1D simulation are analyzed. Both explicit and implicit algorithms are checked. The results showed that the EC scheme can eliminated the self-heating with wide grid spacing in both cases with a small reduction of the accuracies. In typical parameters, the EC implicit scheme has higher precision than EC explicit scheme. Some "numerical cooling" behaviors are observed and analyzed. Some other error are analyzed also. The analysis showed EC implicit scheme can be used to qualitative estimation of some discharge problems with much less computational resource costs without much loss of accuracies.
  • Vanadium dioxide (VO2) undergoes a phase transition at a temperature of 340 K between an insulating monoclinic M1 phase and a conducting rutile phase. Accurate measurements of possible anisotropy of the electronic properties and phonon features of VO2 in the insulating monoclinic M1 and metallic rutile phases are a prerequisite for understanding the phase transition in this correlated system. Recently, it has become possible to grow single domain untwinned VO2 microcrystals which makes it possible to investigate the true anisotropy of VO2. We performed polarized transmission infrared micro-spectroscopy on these untwinned microcrystals in the spectral range between 200 cm-1 and 6000 cm-1 and have obtained the anisotropic phonon parameters and low frequency electronic properties in the insulating monoclinic M1 and metallic rutile phases. We have also performed ab initio GGA+U total energy calculations of phonon frequencies for both phases. We find our measurements and calculations to be in good agreement.
  • A suspended carbon nanotube can act as a nanoscale resonator with remarkable electromechanical properties and the ability to detect adsorption on its surface at the level of single atoms. Understanding adsorption on nanotubes and other graphitic materials is key to many sensing and storage applications. Here we show that nanotube resonators offer a powerful new means of investigating fundamental aspects of adsorption on carbon, including the collective behaviour of adsorbed matter and its coupling to the substrate electrons. By monitoring the vibrational resonance frequency in the presence of noble gases, we observe the formation of monolayers on the cylindrical surface and phase transitions within these monolayers, and simultaneous modification of the electrical conductance. The monolayer observations also demonstrate the possibility of studying the fundamental behaviour of matter in cylindrical geometry.
  • Many strongly correlated electronic materials, including high-temperature superconductors, colossal magnetoresistance and metal-insulator-transition (MIT) materials, are inhomogeneous on a microscopic scale as a result of domain structure or compositional variations. An important potential advantage of nanoscale samples is that they exhibit the homogeneous properties, which can differ greatly from those of the bulk. We demonstrate this principle using vanadium dioxide, which has domain structure associated with its dramatic MIT at 68 degrees C. Our studies of single-domain vanadium dioxide nanobeams reveal new aspects of this famous MIT, including supercooling of the metallic phase by 50 degrees C; an activation energy in the insulating phase consistent with the optical gap; and a connection between the transition and the equilibrium carrier density in the insulating phase. Our devices also provide a nanomechanical method of determining the transition temperature, enable measurements on individual metal-insulator interphase walls, and allow general investigations of a phase transition in quasi-one-dimensional geometry.
  • We demonstrate charge pumping in semiconducting carbon nanotubes by a traveling potential wave. From the observation of pumping in the nanotube insulating state we deduce that transport occurs by packets of charge being carried along by the wave. By tuning the potential of a side gate, transport of either electron or hole packets can be realized. Prospects for the realization of nanotube based single-electron pumps are discussed.