• Multilevel partitioning methods that are inspired by principles of multiscaling are the most powerful practical hypergraph partitioning solvers. Hypergraph partitioning has many applications in disciplines ranging from scientific computing to data science. In this paper we introduce the concept of algebraic distance on hypergraphs and demonstrate its use as an algorithmic component in the coarsening stage of multilevel hypergraph partitioning solvers. The algebraic distance is a vertex distance measure that extends hyperedge weights for capturing the local connectivity of vertices which is critical for hypergraph coarsening schemes. The practical effectiveness of the proposed measure and corresponding coarsening scheme is demonstrated through extensive computational experiments on a diverse set of problems. Finally, we propose a benchmark of hypergraph partitioning problems to compare the quality of other solvers.
  • In today's cyber-enabled smart grids, high penetration of uncertain renewables, purposeful manipulation of meter readings, and the need for wide-area situational awareness, call for fast, accurate, and robust power system state estimation. The least-absolute-value (LAV) estimator is known for its robustness relative to the weighted least-squares (WLS) one. However, due to nonconvexity and nonsmoothness, existing LAV solvers based on linear programming are typically slow, hence inadequate for real-time system monitoring. This paper develops two novel algorithms for efficient LAV estimation, which draw from recent advances in composite optimization. The first is a deterministic linear proximal scheme that handles a sequence of convex quadratic problems, each efficiently solvable either via off-the-shelf algorithms or through the alternating direction method of multipliers. Leveraging the sparse connectivity inherent to power networks, the second scheme is stochastic, and updates only \emph{a few} entries of the complex voltage state vector per iteration. In particular, when voltage magnitude and (re)active power flow measurements are used only, this number reduces to one or two, \emph{regardless of} the number of buses in the network. This computational complexity evidently scales well to large-size power systems. Furthermore, by carefully \emph{mini-batching} the voltage and power flow measurements, accelerated implementation of the stochastic iterations becomes possible. The developed algorithms are numerically evaluated using a variety of benchmark power networks. Simulated tests corroborate that improved robustness can be attained at comparable or markedly reduced computation times for medium- or large-size networks relative to the "workhorse" WLS-based Gauss-Newton iterations.
  • Using Blanchfield pairings, we show that two Alexander polynomials cannot be realized by a pair of matrices with Gordian distance one if a corresponding quadratic equation does not have an integer solution. We also give an example of how our results help in calculating the Gordian distances, algebraic Gordian distances and polynomial distances.
  • We consider the estimation of the state transition matrix in vector autoregressive models, when time sequence data is limited but nonsequence steady-state data is abundant. To leverage both sources of data, we formulate the least squares minimization problem regularized by a Lyapunov penalty. We impose cardinality or rank constraints to reduce the complexity of the autoregressive model. We solve the resulting nonconvex, nonsmooth problem by using the proximal alternating linearization method (PALM). We show that PALM is globally convergent to a critical point and that the estimation error monotonically decreases. Furthermore, we obtain explicit formulas for the proximal operators to facilitate the implementation of PALM. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the developed method on synthetic and real-world data. Our experiments show that PALM outperforms the gradient projection method in both computational efficiency and solution quality.
  • Saliency integration has attracted much attention on unifying saliency maps from multiple saliency models. Previous offline integration methods usually face two challenges: 1. if most of the candidate saliency models misjudge the saliency on an image, the integration result will lean heavily on those inferior candidate models; 2. an unawareness of the ground truth saliency labels brings difficulty in estimating the expertise of each candidate model. To address these problems, in this paper, we propose an arbitrator model (AM) for saliency integration. Firstly, we incorporate the consensus of multiple saliency models and the external knowledge into a reference map to effectively rectify the misleading by candidate models. Secondly, our quest for ways of estimating the expertise of the saliency models without ground truth labels gives rise to two distinct online model-expertise estimation methods. Finally, we derive a Bayesian integration framework to reconcile the saliency models of varying expertise and the reference map. To extensively evaluate the proposed AM model, we test twenty-seven state-of-the-art saliency models, covering both traditional and deep learning ones, on various combinations over four datasets. The evaluation results show that the AM model improves the performance substantially compared to the existing state-of-the-art integration methods, regardless of the chosen candidate saliency models.
  • This paper investigates the distributed computation of the well-known linear matrix equation in the form of $AXB = F$, with the matrices A, B, X, and F of appropriate dimensions, over multi-agent networks from an optimization perspective. In this paper, we consider the standard distributed matrix-information structures, where each agent of the considered multi-agent network has access to one of the sub-block matrices of A, B, and F. To be specific, we first propose different decomposition methods to reformulate the matrix equations in standard structures as distributed constrained optimization problems by introducing substitutional variables; we show that the solutions of the reformulated distributed optimization problems are equivalent to least squares solutions to original matrix equations; and we design distributed continuous-time algorithms for the constrained optimization problems, even by using augmented matrices and a derivative feedback technique. Moreover, we prove the exponential convergence of the algorithms to a least squares solution to the matrix equation for any initial condition.
  • In this paper, we consider the robustness of a basic model of a dynamical distribution network. In the first problem, i.e., optimal weight allocation, we minimize the H-inf- norm of the dynamical distribution network subject to allocation of the weights on the edges. It is shown that this optimization problem can be formulated as a semi-definite program. Next we consider the semi-definiteness of the weighted graph Laplacian matrix with negative weights on the edges. A necessary and sufficient condition, using the effective resistance matrix, is established to guarantee the positive semi-definiteness of the Laplacian matrix. Furthermore, the bounded real lemma is derived for state-space symmetric systems.
  • Outdoor vision-based systems suffer from atmospheric turbulences, and rain is one of the worst factors for vision degradation. Current rain removal methods show limitations either for complex dynamic scenes, or under torrential rain with opaque occlusions. We propose a novel derain framework which applies superpixel (SP) segmentation to decompose the scene into depth consistent units. Alignment of scene contents are done at the SP level, which proves to be robust against rain occlusion interferences and fast camera motion. Two alignment output tensors, i.e., optimal temporal match tensor and sorted spatial-temporal match tensor, provide informative clues for the location of rain streaks and the occluded background contents. Different classical and novel methods such as Robust Principle Component Analysis and Convolutional Neural Networks are applied and compared for their respective advantages in efficiently exploiting the rich spatial-temporal features provided by the two tensors. Extensive evaluations show that advantage of up to 5dB is achieved on the scene restoration PSNR over state-of-the-art methods, and the advantage is especially obvious with highly complex and dynamic scenes. Visual evaluations show that the proposed framework is not only able to suppress heavy and opaque occluding rain streaks, but also large semi-transparent regional fluctuations and distortions.
  • Biexcitons are a manifestation of many-body excitonic interactions crucial for quantum information and quantum computation in the construction of coherent combinations of quantum states. However, due to their small binding energy and low transition efficiency, most biexcitons in conventional semiconductors exist either at cryogenic temperature or under femtosecond pulse laser excitation. Here we demonstrate room temperature, continuous wave driven biexciton states in CsPbBr3 perovskite nanocrystals through coupling with a plasmonic nanogap. The room temperature CsPbBr3 biexciton excitation fluence (~100 mW/cm2) is reduced by ~10^13 times in the Ag nanowire-film nanogaps. The giant enhancement of biexciton emission is driven by coherent biexciton-plasmon Fano interference. These results provide new pathways to develop high efficiency non-blinking single photon sources, entangled light sources and lasers based on biexciton states.
  • In layered LiNixMnyCozO2 cathode material for lithium-ion batteries, the spins of transition metal (TM) ions construct a two-dimensional triangular networks, which can be considered as a simple case of geometrical frustration. By performing neutron powder diffraction experiments and magnetization measurements, we find that long-range magnetic order cannot be established in LiNixMnyCozO2 even at low temperature of 3 K. Remarkably, the frustration parameters of these compounds are estimated to be larger than 30, indicating the existence of strongly frustrated magnetic interactions between spins of TM ions. As frustration will inevitably give rise to lattice instability, the formation of Li/Ni exchange in LiNixMnyCozO2 will help to partially relieve the degeneracy of the frustrated magnetic lattice by forming a stable antiferromagnetic state in hexagonal sublattice with nonmagnetic ions located in centers of the hexagons. Moreover, Li/Ni exchange will introduce 180{\deg} superexchange interaction, which further relieves the magnetic frustration through bringing in new exchange paths. Thus, the variation of Li/Ni exchange ratio vs. TM mole fraction in LiNixMnyCozO2 with different compositions can be well understood and predicted in terms of magnetic frustration and superexchange interactions. This provides a unique viewpoint to study the Li/Ni ions exchange in layered Li(NixMnyCoz)O2 cathode materials.
  • Group zero-attracting LMS and its reweighted form have been proposed for addressing system identification problems with structural group sparsity in the parameters to estimate. Both algorithms however suffer from a trade-off between sparsity degree and estimation bias and, in addition, between convergence speed and steady-state performance like most adaptive filtering algorithms. It is therefore necessary to properly set their step size and regularization parameter. Based on a model of their transient behavior, we introduce a variable-parameter variant of both algorithms to address this issue. By minimizing their mean-square deviation at each time instant, we obtain closed-form expressions of the optimal step size and regularization parameter. Simulation results illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms.
  • Rain removal is important for improving the robustness of outdoor vision based systems. Current rain removal methods show limitations either for complex dynamic scenes shot from fast moving cameras, or under torrential rain fall with opaque occlusions. We propose a novel derain algorithm, which applies superpixel (SP) segmentation to decompose the scene into depth consistent units. Alignment of scene contents are done at the SP level, which proves to be robust towards rain occlusion and fast camera motion. Two alignment output tensors, i.e., optimal temporal match tensor and sorted spatial-temporal match tensor, provide informative clues for rain streak location and occluded background contents to generate an intermediate derain output. These tensors will be subsequently prepared as input features for a convolutional neural network to restore high frequency details to the intermediate output for compensation of mis-alignment blur. Extensive evaluations show that up to 5 dB reconstruction PSNR advantage is achieved over state-of-the-art methods. Visual inspection shows that much cleaner rain removal is achieved especially for highly dynamic scenes with heavy and opaque rainfall from a fast moving camera.
  • Ultrafast lattice deformation of tens to hundreds of nanometer thick metallic crystals, after femtosecond laser excitation, was measured directly using 8.04 keV subpicosecond x-ray and 59 keV femtosecond electron pulses. Coherent phonons were generated in both single crystal and polycrystalline films. Lattice compression was observed within the first few picoseconds after laser irradiation in single crystal aluminum, which was attributed to the generation of a blast force and the propagation of elastic waves. The different time scale of lattice heating for tens and hundreds nanometer thick films are clearly distinguished by electron and x-ray pulse diffraction. The electron and lattice heating due to ultrafast deposition of photon energy was numerically simulated using the two-temperature model (TTM) and the results agreed with experimental observations. The ultrafast heating described by TTM was also discussed from an electrical circuit perspective, which may provide new insights on the possible connection between thermal and electrical processes. This study demonstrates that the combination of two complimentary ultrafast time-resolved methods, ultrafast x-ray and electron diffraction will provide a panoramic picture of the transient atomic motions and structure in crystals.
  • Modifying phonon thermal conductivity in nanomaterials is important not only for fundamental research but also for practical applications. However, the experiments on tailoring the thermal conductivity in nanoscale, especially in two-dimensional materials, are rare due to technical challenges. In this work, we demonstrate in-situ thermal conduction measurement of MoS2 and find that its thermal conductivity can be continuously tuned to a required value from crystalline to amorphous limits. The reduction of thermal conductivity is understood from phonon-defects scatterings that decrease the phonon transmission coefficient. Beyond a threshold, a sharp drop in thermal conductivity is observed, which is believed to be a crystalline-amorphous transition. Our method and results provide guidance for potential applications in thermoelectrics, photoelectronics, and energy harvesting where thermal management is critical with further integration and miniaturization.
  • In this paper, we design and analyze a new zeroth-order online algorithm, namely, the zeroth-order online alternating direction method of multipliers (ZOO-ADMM), which enjoys dual advantages of being gradient-free operation and employing the ADMM to accommodate complex structured regularizers. Compared to the first-order gradient-based online algorithm, we show that ZOO-ADMM requires $\sqrt{m}$ times more iterations, leading to a convergence rate of $O(\sqrt{m}/\sqrt{T})$, where $m$ is the number of optimization variables, and $T$ is the number of iterations. To accelerate ZOO-ADMM, we propose two minibatch strategies: gradient sample averaging and observation averaging, resulting in an improved convergence rate of $O(\sqrt{1+q^{-1}m}/\sqrt{T})$, where $q$ is the minibatch size. In addition to convergence analysis, we also demonstrate ZOO-ADMM to applications in signal processing, statistics, and machine learning.
  • An outstanding problem when computing a function of a matrix, $f(A)$, by using a Krylov method is to accurately estimate errors when convergence is slow. Apart from the case of the exponential function which has been extensively studied in the past, there are no well-established solutions to the problem. Often the quantity of interest in applications is not the matrix $f(A)$ itself, but rather, matrix-vector products or bilinear forms. When the computation related to $f(A)$ is a building block of a larger problem (e.g., approximately computing its trace), a consequence of the lack of reliable error estimates is that the accuracy of the computed result is unknown. In this paper, we consider the problem of computing $\mathrm{tr}(f(A))$ for a symmetric positive-definite matrix $A$ by using the Lanczos method and make two contributions: (i) we propose an error estimate for the bilinear form associated with $f(A)$, and (ii) an error estimate for the trace of $f(A)$. We demonstrate the practical usefulness of these estimates for large matrices and in particular, show that the trace error estimate is indicative of the number of accurate digits. As an application, we compute the log-determinant of a covariance matrix in Gaussian process analysis and underline the importance of error tolerance as a stopping criterion, as a means of bounding the number of Lanczos steps to achieve a desired accuracy.
  • Research in texture recognition often concentrates on recognizing textures with intraclass variations such as illumination, rotation, viewpoint and small scale changes. In contrast, in real-world applications a change in scale can have a dramatic impact on texture appearance, to the point of changing completely from one texture category to another. As a result, texture variations due to changes in scale are amongst the hardest to handle. In this work we conduct the first study of classifying textures with extreme variations in scale. To address this issue, we first propose and then reduce scale proposals on the basis of dominant texture patterns. Motivated by the challenges posed by this problem, we propose a new GANet network where we use a Genetic Algorithm to change the units in the hidden layers during network training, in order to promote the learning of more informative semantic texture patterns. Finally, we adopt a FVCNN (Fisher Vector pooling of a Convolutional Neural Network filter bank) feature encoder for global texture representation. Because extreme scale variations are not necessarily present in most standard texture databases, to support the proposed extreme-scale aspects of texture understanding we are developing a new dataset, the Extreme Scale Variation Textures (ESVaT), to test the performance of our framework. It is demonstrated that the proposed framework significantly outperforms gold-standard texture features by more than 10% on ESVaT. We also test the performance of our proposed approach on the KTHTIPS2b and OS datasets and a further dataset synthetically derived from Forrest, showing superior performance compared to the state of the art.
  • Texture is a fundamental characteristic of many types of images, and texture representation is one of the essential and challenging problems in computer vision and pattern recognition which has attracted extensive research attention. Since 2000, texture representations based on Bag of Words (BoW) and on Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) have been extensively studied with impressive performance. Given this period of remarkable evolution, this paper aims to present a comprehensive survey of advances in texture representation over the last two decades. More than 200 major publications are cited in this survey covering different aspects of the research, which includes (i) problem description; (ii) recent advances in the broad categories of BoW-based, CNN-based and attribute-based methods; and (iii) evaluation issues, specifically benchmark datasets and state of the art results. In retrospect of what has been achieved so far, the survey discusses open challenges and directions for future research.
  • The graph convolutional networks (GCN) recently proposed by Kipf and Welling are an effective graph model for semi-supervised learning. This model, however, was originally designed to be learned with the presence of both training and test data. Moreover, the recursive neighborhood expansion across layers poses time and memory challenges for training with large, dense graphs. To relax the requirement of simultaneous availability of test data, we interpret graph convolutions as integral transforms of embedding functions under probability measures. Such an interpretation allows for the use of Monte Carlo approaches to consistently estimate the integrals, which in turn leads to a batched training scheme as we propose in this work---FastGCN. Enhanced with importance sampling, FastGCN not only is efficient for training but also generalizes well for inference. We show a comprehensive set of experiments to demonstrate its effectiveness compared with GCN and related models. In particular, training is orders of magnitude more efficient while predictions remain comparably accurate.
  • On September 10, 2017, Hurricane Irma made landfall in the Florida Keys and caused significant damage. Informed by hydrodynamic storm surge and wave modeling and post-storm satellite imagery, a rapid damage survey was soon conducted for 1600+ residential buildings in Big Pine Key and Marathon. Damage categorizations and statistical analysis reveal distinct factors governing damage at these two locations. The distance from the coast is significant for the damage in Big Pine Key, as severely damaged buildings were located near narrow waterways connected to the ocean. Building type and size are critical in Marathon, highlighted by the near-complete destruction of trailer communities there. These observations raise issues of affordability and equity that need consideration in damage recovery and rebuilding for resilience.
  • We present results from the investigation of 5-min umbral oscillations in a single-polarity sunspot of active region NOAA 12132. The spectra of TiO, H$\alpha$, and 304 \AA{} are used for corresponding atmospheric heights from the photosphere to lower corona. Power spectrum analysis at the formation height of H$\alpha$ - 0.6 \AA{} to H$\alpha$ center resulted in the detection of 5-min oscillation signals in intensity interpreted as running waves outside the umbral center, mostly with vertical magnetic field inclination $>15\deg$. A phase-speed filter is used to extract the running wave signals with speed $v_{ph}> 4$ km s$^{-1}$, from the time series of H$\alpha$ - 0.4 \AA{} images, and found twenty-four 3-min umbral oscillatory events in a duration of one hour. Interestingly, the initial emergence of the 3-min umbral oscillatory events are noticed closer to or at umbral boundaries. These 3-min umbral oscillatory events are observed for the first time as propagating from a fraction of preceding Running Penumbral Waves (RPWs). These fractional wavefronts rapidly separates from RPWs and move towards umbral center, wherein they expand radially outwards suggesting the beginning of a new umbral oscillatory event. We found that most of these umbral oscillatory events develop further into RPWs. We speculate that the waveguides of running waves are twisted in spiral structures and hence the wavefronts are first seen at high latitudes of umbral boundaries and later at lower latitudes of the umbral center.
  • In this paper, we study the $H_\infty$-norm of linear systems over graphs, which is used to model distribution networks. In particular, we aim to minimize the $H_\infty$-norm subject to allocation of the weights on the edges. The optimization problem is formulated with LMI (Linear-Matrix-Inequality) constraints. For distribution networks with one port, i.e., SISO systems, we show that the $H_\infty$-norm coincides with the effective resistance between the nodes in the port. Moreover, we derive an upper bound of the $H_\infty$-norm, which is in terms of the algebraic connectivity of the graph on which the distribution network is defined.
  • We propose a novel class of kernels to alleviate the high computational cost of large-scale nonparametric learning with kernel methods. The proposed kernel is defined based on a hierarchical partitioning of the underlying data domain, where the Nystr\"om method (a globally low-rank approximation) is married with a locally lossless approximation in a hierarchical fashion. The kernel maintains (strict) positive-definiteness. The corresponding kernel matrix admits a recursively off-diagonal low-rank structure, which allows for fast linear algebra computations. Suppressing the factor of data dimension, the memory and arithmetic complexities for training a regression or a classifier are reduced from $O(n^2)$ and $O(n^3)$ to $O(nr)$ and $O(nr^2)$, respectively, where $n$ is the number of training examples and $r$ is the rank on each level of the hierarchy. Although other randomized approximate kernels entail a similar complexity, empirical results show that the proposed kernel achieves a matching performance with a smaller $r$. We demonstrate comprehensive experiments to show the effective use of the proposed kernel on data sizes up to the order of millions.
  • Exciton-polaritons in semiconductor microcavities generate fascinating effects such as long-range spatial coherence and Bose-Einstein Condensation (BEC), which are attractive for their potential use in low threshold lasers, vortices and slowing light, etc. However, currently most of exciton-polariton effects either occur at cryogenic temperature or rely on expensive cavity fabrication procedures. Further exploring new semiconductor microcavities with stronger exciton photon interaction strength is extensively needed. Herein, we demonstrate room temperature photon exciton strong coupling in hybrid inorganic-organic CH3NH3PbBr3 Fabry-P\'erot microcavities for the first time. The vacuum Rabi splitting energy is up to ~390 meV, which is ascribed to large oscillator strength and photon confinement in reduced dimension of optical microcavities. With increasing pumping energy, exciton-photon coupling strength is weakened due to carrier screening effect, leading to occurrence of photonic lasing instead of polartion lasing. The demonstrated strong coupling between photons and excitons in perovskite microcavities would be helpful for development of high performance polariton-based incoherent and coherent light sources, nonlinear optics, and slow light applications.
  • Depth estimation is a fundamental problem for light field photography applications. Numerous methods have been proposed in recent years, which either focus on crafting cost terms for more robust matching, or on analyzing the geometry of scene structures embedded in the epipolar-plane images. Significant improvements have been made in terms of overall depth estimation error; however, current state-of-the-art methods still show limitations in handling intricate occluding structures and complex scenes with multiple occlusions. To address these challenging issues, we propose a very effective depth estimation framework which focuses on regularizing the initial label confidence map and edge strength weights. Specifically, we first detect partially occluded boundary regions (POBR) via superpixel based regularization. Series of shrinkage/reinforcement operations are then applied on the label confidence map and edge strength weights over the POBR. We show that after weight manipulations, even a low-complexity weighted least squares model can produce much better depth estimation than state-of-the-art methods in terms of average disparity error rate, occlusion boundary precision-recall rate, and the preservation of intricate visual features.