• Transforming a laser beam into a mass flow has been a challenge both scientifically and technologically. Here we report the discovery of a new optofluidics principle and demonstrate the generation of a steady-state water flow by a pulsed laser beam through a glass window. In order to generate a flow or stream in the same path as the refracted laser beam in pure water from an arbitrary spot on the window, we first fill a glass cuvette with an aqueous solution of Au nanoparticles. A flow will emerge from the focused laser spot on the window after the laser is turned on for a few to tens of minutes, the flow remains after the colloidal solution is completely replaced by pure water. Microscopically, this transformation is made possible by an underlying plasmonic nanoparticle-decorated cavity which is self-fabricated on the glass by nanoparticle-assisted laser etching and exhibits size and shape uniquely tailored to the incident beam profile. Hydrophone signals indicate that the flow is driven via acoustic streaming by a long-lasting ultrasound wave that is resonantly generated by the laser and the cavity through the photoacoustic effect. The principle of this light-driven flow via ultrasound, i.e. photoacoustic streaming by coupling photoacoustics to acoustic streaming, is general and can be applied to any liquids, opening up new research and applications in optofluidics as well as traditional photoacoustics and acoustic streaming.
  • Three-dimensional lead halide perovskites have surprised people for their defect-tolerant electronic and optical properties, two-dimensional lead halide layered structures exhibit even more puzzling phenomena: luminescent edge states in Ruddlesden-Popper perovskites and conflicting reports of highly luminescent versus non-emissive CsPb$_{\text{2}}$Br$_{\text{5}}$. In this work, we report the observation of bright luminescent surface states on the edges of CsPb$_{\text{2}}$Br$_{\text{5}}$ microplatelets. We prove that green surface emission makes wide-bandgap single crystal CsPb$_{\text{2}}$Br$_{\text{5}}$ highly luminescent. Using polarized Raman spectroscopy and atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy, we further prove that polycrystalline CsPb$_{\text{2}}$Br$_{\text{5}}$ is responsible for the bright luminescence. We propose that these bright edge states originate from corner-sharing clusters of PbBr$_{\text{6}}$ in the distorted regions between CsPb$_{\text{2}}$Br$_{\text{5}}$ nanocrystals. Because metal halide octahedrons are building blocks of perovskites, our discoveries settle a long-standing controversy over the basic property of CsPb$_{\text{2}}$Br$_{\text{5}}$ and open new opportunities to understand, design and engineer perovskite solar cells and other optoelectronic devices.
  • The monolithic integration of electronics and photonics has attracted enormous attention due to its potential applications. However, the realization of such hybrid circuits has remained a challenge because it requires optical communication at nanometer scales. A major challenge to this integration is the identification of a suitable material. After discussing the material aspect of the challenge, we identified atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) as a perfect material platform to implement the circuit. The selection of TMDs is based on their very distinct property: monolayer TMDs are able to emit and absorb light at the same wavelength determined by direct exciton transitions. To prove the concept, we fabricated simple devices consisting of silver nanowires as plasmonic waveguides and monolayer TMDs as active optoelectronic media. Using photoexcitation, direct optical imaging and spectral analysis, we demonstrated generation and detection of surface plasmon polaritons by monolayer TMDs. Regarded as novel materials for electronics and photonics, transition metal dichalcogenides are expected to find new applications in next generation integrated circuits.
  • We report the observation of anomalously strong 2D band in twisted bilayer graphene (tBLG) with large rotation angles under 638-nm and 532-nm visible laser excitation. The 2D band of tBLG can reach four times as opposed to two times as strong as that of single layer graphene. The same tBLG samples also exhibit rotation dependent G-line resonances and folded phonons under 364-nm UV laser excitation. We attribute this 2D band Raman enhancement to the constructive quantum interference between two double-resonance Raman pathways which are enabled by nearly degenerate Dirac band in tBLG Moir\'e superlattices.
  • Two new Raman modes below 100 cm^-1 are observed in twisted bilayer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. The two modes are observed in a small range of twisting angle at which the intensity of the G Raman peak is strongly enhanced, indicating that these low energy modes and the G Raman mode share the same resonance enhancement mechanism, as a function of twisting angle. The 94 cm^-1 mode (measured with a 532 nm laser excitation) is assigned to the fundamental layer breathing vibration (ZO (prime) mode) mediated by the twisted bilayer graphene lattice, which lacks long-range translational symmetry. The dependence of this modes frequency and linewidth on the rotational angle can be explained by the double resonance Raman process which is different from the previously-identified Raman processes activated by twisted bilayer graphene superlattice. The dependence also reveals the strong impact of electronic-band overlaps of the two graphene layers. Another new mode at 52 cm^-1, not observed previously in the bilayer graphene system, is tentatively attributed to a torsion mode in which the bottom and top graphene layers rotate out-of-phase in the plane.
  • We report field-effect transistors (FETs) with single-crystal molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) channels synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). For a bilayer MoS2 FET, the mobility is ~17 cm2V-1s-1 and the on/off current ratio is ~108, which are much higher than those of FETs based on CVD polycrystalline MoS2 films. By avoiding the detrimental effects of the grain boundaries and the contamination introduced by the transfer process, the quality of the CVD MoS2 atomic layers deposited directly on SiO2 is comparable to the best exfoliated MoS2 flakes. It shows that CVD is a viable method to synthesize high quality MoS2 atomic layers.
  • Twisted bilayer graphene (tBLG) provides us with a large rotational freedom to explore new physics and novel device applications, but many of its basic properties remain unresolved. Here we report the synthesis and systematic Raman study of tBLG. Chemical vapor deposition was used to synthesize hexagon- shaped tBLG with a rotation angle that can be conveniently determined by relative edge misalignment. Superlattice structures are revealed by the observation of two distinctive Raman features: folded optical phonons and enhanced intensity of the 2D-band. Both signatures are strongly correlated with G-line resonance, rotation angle and laser excitation energy. The frequency of folded phonons decreases with the increase of the rotation angle due to increasing size of the reduced Brillouin zone (rBZ) and the zone folding of transverse optic (TO) phonons to the rBZ of superlattices. The anomalous enhancement of 2D-band intensity is ascribed to the constructive quantum interference between two Raman paths enabled by a near-degenerate Dirac cone. The fabrication and Raman identification of superlattices pave the way for further basic study and new applications of tBLG.
  • We evaluate how a second graphene layer forms and grows on Cu foils during chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Low-energy electron diffraction and microscopy is used to reveal that the second layer nucleates and grows next to the substrate, i.e., under a graphene layer. This underlayer mechanism can facilitate the synthesis of uniform single-layer films but presents challenges for growing uniform bilayer films by CVD. We also show that the buried and overlying layers have the same edge termination.
  • The strong interest in graphene has motivated the scalable production of high quality graphene and graphene devices. Since large-scale graphene films synthesized to date are typically polycrystalline, it is important to characterize and control grain boundaries, generally believed to degrade graphene quality. Here we study single-crystal graphene grains synthesized by ambient CVD on polycrystalline Cu, and show how individual boundaries between coalescing grains affect graphene's electronic properties. The graphene grains show no definite epitaxial relationship with the Cu substrate, and can cross Cu grain boundaries. The edges of these grains are found to be predominantly parallel to zigzag directions. We show that grain boundaries give a significant Raman "D" peak, impede electrical transport, and induce prominent weak localization indicative of intervalley scattering in graphene. Finally, we demonstrate an approach using pre-patterned growth seeds to control graphene nucleation, opening a route towards scalable fabrication of single-crystal graphene devices without grain boundaries.
  • A Fano-like phonon resonance is observed in few-layer (~3) graphene at room temperature using infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy. This Fano resonance is the manifestation of a strong electron-phonon interaction between the discrete in-plane lattice vibrational mode and continuum electronic excitations in graphene. By employing ammonia chemical doping, we have obtained different Fano line shapes ranging from anti-resonance in hole-doped graphene to phonon-dominated in n-type graphene. The Fano resonance shows the strongest interference feature when the Fermi level is located near the Dirac point. The charged phonon exhibits much-enhanced oscillator strength and experiences a continuous red shift in frequency as electron density increases. It is suggested that the phonon couples to different electronic transitions as Fermi level is tuned by chemical doping.
  • We report on electronic properties of graphene synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on copper then transferred to SiO2/Si. Wafer-scale (up to 4 inches) graphene films have been synthesized, consisting dominantly of monolayer graphene as indicated by spectroscopic Raman mapping. Low temperature transport measurements are performed on micro devices fabricated from such CVD graphene, displaying ambipolar field effect (with on/off ratio ~5 and carrier mobilities up to ~3000 cm^2/Vs) and "half-integer" quantum Hall effect, a hall-mark of intrinsic electronic properties of monolayer graphene. We also observe weak localization and extract information about phase coherence and scattering of carriers.
  • We present a systematic study of the current-voltage characteristics and electroluminescence of gallium nitride (GaN) nanowire on silicon (Si) substrate heterostructures where both semiconductors are n-type. A novel feature of this device is that by reversing the polarity of the applied voltage the luminescence can be selectively obtained from either the nanowire or the substrate. For one polarity of the applied voltage, ultraviolet (and visible) light is generated in the GaN nanowire, while for the opposite polarity infrared light is emitted from the Si substrate. We propose a model, which explains the key features of the data, based on electron tunnelling from the valence band of one semiconductor into the conduction band of the other semiconductor. For example, for one polarity of the applied voltage, given a sufficient potential energy difference between the two semiconductors, electrons can tunnel from the valence band of GaN into the Si conduction band. This process results in the creation of holes in GaN, which can recombine with conduction band electrons generating GaN band-to-band luminescence. A similar process applies under the opposite polarity for Si light emission. This device structure affords an additional experimental handle to the study of electroluminescence in single nanowires and, furthermore, could be used as a novel approach to two-colour light-emitting devices.
  • We present a hybrid light-emitting diode structure composed of an n-type gallium nitride nanowire on a p-type silicon substrate in which current is injected along the length of the nanowire. The device emits ultraviolet light under both bias polarities. Tunnel-injection of holes from the p-type substrate (under forward bias) and from the metal (under reverse bias) through thin native oxide barriers consistently explains the observed electroluminescence behaviour. This work shows that the standard p-n junction model is generally not applicable to this kind of device structure.