• This paper describes an application of the Quantum Approximate Optimisation Algorithm (QAOA) to efficiently find approximate solutions for computational problems contained in the polynomially bounded NP optimisation complexity class (NPO PB). We consider a generalisation of the QAOA state evolution to alternating quantum walks and solution-quality-dependent phase shifts, and use the quantum walks to integrate the problem constraints of NPO problems. We apply the recent concept of a hybrid quantum-classical variational scheme to attempt finding the highest expectation value, which contains a high-quality solution. The algorithm is applied to the problem of minimum vertex cover, showing promising results using only a fixed and low number of optimisation parameters.
  • Most existing methods of semantic segmentation still suffer from two aspects of challenges: intra-class inconsistency and inter-class indistinction. To tackle these two problems, we propose a Discriminative Feature Network (DFN), which contains two sub-networks: Smooth Network and Border Network. Specifically, to handle the intra-class inconsistency problem, we specially design a Smooth Network with Channel Attention Block and global average pooling to select the more discriminative features. Furthermore, we propose a Border Network to make the bilateral features of boundary distinguishable with deep semantic boundary supervision. Based on our proposed DFN, we achieve state-of-the-art performance 86.2% mean IOU on PASCAL VOC 2012 and 80.3% mean IOU on Cityscapes dataset.
  • The BMS symmetry and related near horizon symmetry play important role in holography in asymptotically flat spacetimes. They may also be crucial for the solution of information paradox. We still don't fully understand those infinite-dimensional symmetry. On the other hand, $W_{1+\infty}$ symmetry is the quantum version of area-preserving diffeomorphism of the plane. It can be used to classify the quantum Hall effect universality classes. In this paper, we will show that the form symmetries can be obtained form the $W_{1+\infty}$ symmetry. With the help of $W_{1+\infty}$, the black holes in three dimensional spacerime can be classified just like the quantum hall effect. This gives another evidence to support our claim that "black hole as topological insulator".
  • Toward a deeper understanding on the inner work of deep neural networks, we investigate CNN (convolutional neural network) using DCN (deconvolutional network) and randomization technique, and gain new insights for the intrinsic property of this network architecture. For the random representations of an untrained CNN, we train the corresponding DCN to reconstruct the input images. Compared with the image inversion on pre-trained CNN, our training converges faster and the yielding network exhibits higher quality for image reconstruction. It indicates there is rich information encoded in the random features; the pre-trained CNN may discard information irrelevant for classification and encode relevant features in a way favorable for classification but harder for reconstruction. We further explore the property of the overall random CNN-DCN architecture. Surprisingly, images can be inverted with satisfactory quality. Extensive empirical evidence as well as theoretical analysis are provided.
  • In the previous paper Ref.\cite{wangti1}, it was claimed that the black hole can be considered as a kind of topological insulator. For BTZ black hole in three dimensional $AdS_3$ spacetime two evidences were given to support this claim: the first evidence comes from the black hole "membrane paradigm", and the second evidence comes from the fact that the horizon of BTZ black hole can support two chiral massless scalar field with opposite chirality. Those are two key properties of 2D topological insulator. For higher dimensional black hole the first evidence is still valid but the second fails. In this paper, starting from the boundary BF theory, which can be used to describe the boundary degrees of freedom of black hole in arbitrary dimension, we shown that the isolated horizon of $3+1-$D spherical black hole can support massless scalar field and vector field. Those two fields can be used to construct a massless Dirac field through the $2+1-$dimensional bosonization, which also appears on the boundary of $3+1-$D topological insulators.
  • A new method for compiling quantum algorithms is proposed and tested for a three qubit system. The proposed method is to decompose a a unitary matrix U, into a product of simpler U j via a neural network. These U j can then be decomposed into product of known quantum gates. Key to the effectiveness of this approach is the restriction of the set of training data generated to paths which approximate minimal normal subRiemannian geodesics, as this removes unnecessary redundancy and ensures the products are unique. The two neural networks are shown to work effectively, each individually returning low loss values on validation data after relatively short training periods. The two networks are able to return coefficients that are sufficiently close to the true coefficient values to validate this method as an approach for generating quantum circuits. There is scope for more work in scaling this approach to larger quantum systems.
  • Black holes are extraordinary massive objects which can be described classically by general relativity, and topological insulators are new phases of matter that could be use to built a topological quantum computer. They seem to be different objects, but in this paper, we claim that the black hole can be considered as a kind of topological insulator. For BTZ black hole in three dimensional $AdS_3$ spacetime we give two evidences to support this claim: the first evidence comes from the black hole "membrane paradigm", which says that the horizon of black hole behaves like an electrical conductor. On the other hand, the vacuum can be considered as an insulator. The second evidence comes from the fact that the horizon of BTZ black hole can support two chiral massless scalar field with opposite chirality. Those are two key properties of 2D topological insulator. For higher dimensional black hole the first evidence is still valid. So we conjecture that the higher dimensional black hole can also be considered as higher dimensional topological insulators. This conjecture will have far-reaching influences on our understanding of quantum black hole and the nature of gravity.
  • In three dimensional spacetime with negative cosmology constant, the general relativity can be written as two copies of SO$(2,1)$ Chern-Simons theory. On a manifold with boundary the Chern-Simons theory induces a conformal field theory--WZW theory on the boundary. In this paper, it is show that with suitable boundary condition for BTZ black hole, the WZW theory can reduce to a massless scalar field on the horizon.
  • This paper discusses the problem of lack of clear licensing and transparency of usage terms and conditions for research metadata. Making research data connected, discoverable and reusable are the key enablers of the new data revolution in research. We discuss how the lack of transparency hinders discovery of research data and make it disconnected from the publication and other trusted research outcomes. In addition, we discuss the application of Creative Commons licenses for research metadata, and provide some examples of the applicability of this approach to internationally known data infrastructures.
  • In this paper, we get the holographic equipartition form the first order formulism, that is, the connection and its conjugate momentum are considered to be the canonical variables. The final results have similar structure as those from the metric formulism.
  • In this paper, we analysis the counter-term for the general relativity in the Palatini framework. The expression is valid for both the null boundary and non-null boundary. We show that final results coincide with that in Ref.\cite{pad1} which starts form the Einstein-Hilbert action.
  • In this paper, the isolated horizons with rotation are considered. It is shown that the symplectic form is the same as that in the nonrotating case. As a result, the boundary degrees of freedom can be also described by an SO$(1,1)$ BF theory. The entropy satisfies the Bekenstein-Hawking area law with the same Barbero-Immirzi parameter.
  • In this paper, the BF theory method is applied to the nonrotating isolated horizons in Lovelock theory. The final entropy matches the Wald entropy formula for this theory. We also confirm the conclusion got by Bodendorfer et. al. that the entropy is related to the flux operator rather than the area operator in general diffeomorphic-invariant theory.
  • Micro-channel plate (MCP)-based photodetectors are capable of picosecond level time resolution and sub-mm level position resolution, which makes them a perfect candidate for the next generation large area photodetectors. The large-area picosecond photodetector (LAPPD) collaboration is developing new techniques for making large-area photodetectors based on new MCP fabrication and functionalization methods. A small single tube processing system (SmSTPS) was constructed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for developing scalable, cost-effective, glass-body, 6 cm x 6 cm, picosecond photodetectors based on MCPs functionalized by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD). Recently, a number of fully processed and hermitically sealed prototypes made of MCPs with 20 micron pores have been fabricated. This is a significant milestone for the LAPPD project. These prototypes were characterized with a pulsed laser test facility. Without optimization, the prototypes have shown excellent results: The time resolution is ~57 ps for single photoelectron mode and ~15 ps for multi-photoelectron mode; the best position resolution is < 0.8 mm for large pulses. In this paper, the tube processing system, the detector assembly, experimental setup, data analysis and the key performance will be presented.
  • Quantum fluctuations of the gravitational field in the early Universe, amplified by inflation, produce a primordial gravitational-wave background across a broad frequency band. We derive constraints on the spectrum of this gravitational radiation, and hence on theories of the early Universe, by combining experiments that cover 29 orders of magnitude in frequency. These include Planck observations of cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization power spectra and lensing, together with baryon acoustic oscillations and big bang nucleosynthesis measurements, as well as new pulsar timing array and ground-based interferometer limits. While individual experiments constrain the gravitational-wave energy density in specific frequency bands, the combination of experiments allows us to constrain cosmological parameters, including the inflationary spectral index, $n_t$, and the tensor-to-scalar ratio, $r$. Results from individual experiments include the most stringent nanohertz limit of the primordial background to date from the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array, $\Omega_{\rm gw}(f)<2.3\times10^{-10}$. Observations of the cosmic microwave background alone limit the gravitational-wave spectral index at 95\% confidence to $n_t\lesssim5$ for a tensor-to-scalar ratio of $r = 0.11$. However, the combination of all the above experiments limits $n_t<0.36$. Future Advanced LIGO observations are expected to further constrain $n_t<0.34$ by 2020. When cosmic microwave background experiments detect a non-zero $r$, our results will imply even more stringent constraints on $n_t$ and hence theories of the early Universe.
  • The random walk formalism is used across a wide range of applications, from modelling share prices to predicting population genetics. Likewise quantum walks have shown much potential as a frame- work for developing new quantum algorithms. In this paper, we present explicit efficient quantum circuits for implementing continuous-time quantum walks on the circulant class of graphs. These circuits allow us to sample from the output probability distributions of quantum walks on circulant graphs efficiently. We also show that solving the same sampling problem for arbitrary circulant quantum circuits is intractable for a classical computer, assuming conjectures from computational complexity theory. This is a new link between continuous-time quantum walks and computational complexity theory and it indicates a family of tasks which could ultimately demonstrate quantum supremacy over classical computers. As a proof of principle we have experimentally implemented the proposed quantum circuit on an example circulant graph using a two-qubit photonics quantum processor.
  • In this paper, the entropy of isolated horizons in non-minimally coupling scalar field theory and in the scalar-tensor theory of gravitation is calculated by counting the degree of freedom of quantum states in loop quantum gravity. Instead of boundary Chern-Simons theory, the boundary BF theory is used. The advantages of the new approaches are that no spherical symmetry is needed, and that the final result matches exactly with the Wald entropy formula.
  • It is shown in this paper that the symplectic form for the system consisting of $D$-dimensional bulk Palatini gravity and SO$(1,1)$ BF theory on an isolated horizon as a boundary just contains the bulk term. An alternative quantization procedure for the boundary BF theory is presented. The area entropy is determined by the degree of freedom of the bulk spin network states which satisfy a suitable boundary condition. The gauge-fixing condition in the approach and the advantages of the approach are also discussed.
  • We consider the nonrotating isolated horizon as an inner boundary of a four-dimensional asymptotically flat spacetime region. Due to the symmetry of the isolated horizon, it turns out that the boundary degrees of freedom can be described by a SO(1,1) BF theory with sources. This provides a new alternative approach to the usual one using Chern-Simons theory to study the black hole entropy. To count the microscopical degrees of freedom with the boundary BF theory, the entropy of the isolated horizon can also be calculated in the framework of loop quantum gravity. The leading-order contribution to the entropy coincides with the Bekenstein-Hawking area law only for a particular choice of the Barbero-Immirzi parameter, which is different from its value in the usual approach using Chern-Simons theory. Moreover, the quantum correction to the entropy formula is a constant term rather than a logarithmic term.
  • Pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) can be used to search for very low frequency ($10^{-9}$--$10^{-7}$ Hz) gravitational waves (GWs). In this paper we present a general method for the detection and localization of single-source GWs using PTAs. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this new method for three types of signals: monochromatic waves as expected from individual supermassive binary black holes in circular orbits, GWs from eccentric binaries and GW bursts. We also test its implementation in realistic data sets that include effects such as uneven sampling and heterogeneous data spans and measurement precision. It is shown that our method, which works in the frequency domain, performs as well as published time-domain methods. In particular, we find it equivalent to the $\mathcal{F}_{e}$-statistic for monochromatic waves. We also discuss the construction of null streams -- data streams that have null response to GWs, and the prospect of using null streams as a consistency check in the case of detected GW signals. Finally, we present sensitivities to individual supermassive binary black holes in eccentric orbits. We find that a monochromatic search that is designed for circular binaries can efficiently detect eccentric binaries with both high and low eccentricities, while a harmonic summing technique provides greater sensitivities only for binaries with moderate eccentricities.
  • In this paper, we extend the calculation of the entropy of the nonrotating isolated horizons in 4 dimensional spacetime to that in a higher dimensional spacetime. We show that the boundary degrees of freedom on an isolated horizon can be described effectively by a punctured $SO(1,1)$ BF theory. Then the entropy of the nonrotating isolated horizon can be calculated out by counting the microstates. It satisfies the Bekenstein-Hawking law.
  • The "glitch crisis" of Vela-like pulsars has been a great debate recently. It might challenge the standard two-component glitch model, because large fractions of superfluid neutrons are thought to be entrained in the lattices of the crust part, then there is not enough superfluid neutrons to trigger the large glitches in Vela-like pulsars. But the amount of entrainment which could effectively constrain the fractional moment of inertia of a pulsar, is very uncertain. In order to examine the importance of this parameter on the inner structures of neutron stars, we relax the "glitch crisis" argument, employ a set of most developed equations of state derived within microscopic many-body approaches that could fulfill the recent 2-solar-mass constraint, and evaluate their predictions for the fractional moment of inertia with two extremes of crustal entrainment. We find a final determination of the amount of entrainment could be closely related to the type of neutron star. If a large enough fraction of neutrons are entrained, a Vela-like pulsar could not be a hybrid star, namely no free quarks would be present in its core. In addition, we use the Vela data to narrow the parameter space of hyperon-meson couplings in the popular phenomenological relativistic mean field model.
  • In this paper, we calculated the entropy of the BTZ black hole in the framework of loop quantum gravity. We got the result that the horizon degrees of freedom can be described by the 2D SO(1,1) punctured BF theory. Finally we got the area law for the entropy of BTZ black hole.
  • Gravitational wave bursts produced by supermassive binary black hole mergers will leave a persistent imprint on the space-time metric. Such gravitational wave memory signals are detectable by pulsar timing arrays as a glitch event that would seem to occur simultaneously for all pulsars. In this paper, we describe an initial algorithm which can be used to search for gravitational wave memory signals. We apply this algorithm to the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array data set. No significant gravitational wave memory signal is founded in the data set.
  • From 2000 to 2010, monitoring of radio emission from the Crab pulsar at Xinjiang Observatory detected a total of nine glitches. The occurrence of glitches appears to be a random process as described by previous researches. A persistent change in pulse frequency and pulse frequency derivative after each glitch was found. There is no obvious correlation between glitch sizes and the time since last glitch. For these glitches $\Delta\nu_{p}$ and $\Delta\dot{\nu}_{p}$ span two orders of magnitude. The pulsar suffered the largest frequency jump ever seen on MJD 53067.1. The size of the glitch is $\sim$ 6.8 $\times 10^{-6}$ Hz, $\sim$ 3.5 times that of the glitch occured in 1989 glitch, with a very large permanent changes in frequency and pulse frequency derivative and followed by a decay with time constant $\sim$ 21 days. The braking index presents significant changes. We attribute this variation to a varying particle wind strength which may be caused by glitch activities. We discuss the properties of detected glitches in Crab pulsar and compare them with glitches in the Vela pulsar.