• As a representative sequential pattern mining problem, counting the frequency of serial episodes from a streaming sequence has drawn continuous attention in academia due to its wide application in practice, e.g., telecommunication alarms, stock market, transaction logs, bioinformatics, etc. Although a number of serial episodes mining algorithms have been developed recently, most of them are neither stream-oriented, as they require multi-pass of dataset, nor time-aware, as they fail to take into account the time constraint of serial episodes. In this paper, we propose two novel one-pass algorithms, ONCE and ONCE+, each of which can respectively compute two popular frequencies of given episodes satisfying predefined time-constraint as signals in a stream arrives one-after-another. ONCE is only used for non-overlapped frequency where the occurrences of a serial episode in sequence are not intersected. ONCE+ is designed for the distinct frequency where the occurrences of a serial episode do not share any event. Theoretical study proves that our algorithm can correctly mine the frequency of target time constraint serial episodes in a given stream. Experimental study over both real-world and synthetic datasets demonstrates that the proposed algorithm can work, with little time and space, in signal-intensive streams where millions of signals arrive within a single second. Moreover, the algorithm has been applied in a real stream processing system, where the efficacy and efficiency of this work is tested in practical applications.
  • The nature of the spiral structure of the Milky Way has long been debated. Only in the last decade have astronomers been able to accurately measure distances to a substantial number of high-mass star-forming regions, the classic tracers of spiral structure in galaxies. We report distance measurements at radio wavelengths using the Very Long Baseline Array for eight regions of massive star formation near the Local spiral arm of the Milky Way. Combined with previous measurements, these observations reveal that the Local Arm is larger than previously thought, and both its pitch angle and star formation rate are comparable to those of the Galaxy's major spiral arms, such as Sagittarius and Perseus. Toward the constellation Cygnus, sources in the Local Arm extend for a great distance along our line of sight and roughly along the solar orbit. Because of this orientation, these sources cluster both on the sky and in velocity to form the complex and long enigmatic Cygnus X region. We also identify a spur that branches between the Local and Sagittarius spiral arms.
  • Approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) refers to a family of inference methods used in the Bayesian analysis of complex models where evaluation of the likelihood is difficult. Conventional ABC methods often suffer from the curse of dimensionality, and a marginal adjustment strategy was recently introduced in the literature to improve the performance of ABC algorithms in high-dimensional problems. The marginal adjustment approach is extended using a Gaussian copula approximation. The method first estimates the bivariate posterior for each pair of parameters separately using a 2-dimensional Gaussian copula, and then combines these estimates together to estimate the joint posterior. The approximation works well in large sample settings when the posterior is approximately normal, but also works well in many cases which are far from that situation due to the nonparametric estimation of the marginal posterior distributions. If each bivariate posterior distribution can be well estimated with a low-dimensional ABC analysis then this Gaussian copula method can extend ABC methods to problems of high dimension. The method also results in an analytic expression for the approximate posterior which is useful for many purposes such as approximation of the likelihood itself. This method is illustrated with several examples.
  • We present a design of a one dimensional dielectric waveguide that can trap a broad band light pulse with different frequency component stored at different positions, effectively forming a "trapped rainbow"[1]. The spectrum of the rainbow covers the whole visible range. To do this, we first show that the dispersion of a $\text{SiO}_2$ waveguide with a Si grating placed on top can be engineered by the design parameter of the grating. Specifically, guided modes with zero group velocity(frozen modes) can be realized. Negative Goos-H\"anchen shift along the surface of the grating is responsible for such a dispersion control. The frequency of the frozen mode is tuned by changing the lateral feature parameters (period and duty cycle) of the grating. By tuning the grating feature point by point along the waveguide, a light pulse can be trapped with different frequency components frozen at different positions, so that a "rainbow" is formed. The device is expected to have extremely low ohmic loss because only dielectric materials are used. A planar geometry also promises much reduced fabrication difficulty.
  • The improved Kelson-Garvey (ImKG) mass relations are proposed from the mass differences of mirror nuclei. The masses of 31 measured proton-rich nuclei with $7\leq A\leq41$ and $-5\leq (N-Z)\leq-3$ can be remarkably well reproduced by using the proposed relations, with a root-mean-square deviation of 0.398 MeV, which is much smaller than the results of Kelson-Garvey (0.502 MeV) and Isobar-Mirror mass relations (0.647 MeV). This is because many more masses of participating nuclei are involved in the ImKG mass relations for predicting the masses of unknown proton-rich nuclei. The masses for 144 unknown proton-rich nuclei with $6\leq A\leq74$ are predicted by using the ImKG mass relations. The one- and two-proton separation energies for these proton-rich nuclei and the diproton emission are investigated simultaneously.
  • The nucleon-nucleon interaction is investigated by using the ImQMD model with the three sets of parameters IQ1, IQ2 and IQ3 in which the corresponding incompressibility coefficients of nuclear matter are different. The charge distribution of fragments for various reaction systems are calculated at different incident energies. The parameters strongly affect the charge distribution below the threshold energy of nuclear multifragmentation. The fragment multiplicity spectrum for $^{238}$U+$^{197}$Au at 15 AMeV and the charge distribution for $^{129}$Xe+$^{120}$Sn at 32 and 45 AMeV, and $^{197}$Au+$^{197}$Au at 35 AMeV are reproduced by the ImQMD model with the set of parameter IQ3. It is concluded that charge distribution of the fragments and the fragment multiplicity spectrum are good observables for studying N-N interaction, the Fermi energy region is a sensitive energy region to explore the N-N interaction, and IQ3 is a suitable set of parameters for the ImQMD model.
  • We present a novel design of optical micro-cavity where the optical energy resides primarily in free space, therefore is readily accessible to foreign objects such as atoms, molecules, mechanical resonators, etc. We describe the physics of these resonators, and propose a design method based on stochastic optimization. Cavity designs with diffraction-limited mode volumes and quality factors in the range of $10^4$--$10^6$ are presented. With a purely planar geometry, the cavity can be easily integrated on-chip using conventional micro- and nano- fabrication processes.
  • Sub-wavelength dielectric gratings (SWG) have emerged recently as a promising alternative to distributed-Bragg-reflection (DBR) dielectric stacks for broadband, high-reflectivity filtering applications. A SWG structure composed of a single dielectric layer with the appropriate patterning can sometimes perform as well as thirty or forty dielectric DBR layers, while providing new functionalities such as polarization control and near-field amplification. In this paper, we introduce a remarkable property of grating mirrors that cannot be realized by their DBR counterpart: we show that a non-periodic patterning of the grating surface can give full control over the phase front of reflected light while maintaining a high reflectivity. This new feature of dielectric gratings could have a substantial impact on a number of applications that depend on low-cost, compact optical components, from laser cavities to CD/DVD read/write heads.
  • Following our recent idea of using plasmonic and non-plasmonic nanoparticles as nanoinductors and nanocapacitors in the infrared and optical domains [N. Engheta, A. Salandrino, and A. Alu, Phys. Rev. Letts., Vol. 95, 095504, (2005)], in this work we analyze in detail some complex circuit configurations involving series and parallel combinations of these lumped nanocircuit elements at optical frequencies. Using numerical simulations, it is demonstrated that, after a proper design, the behavior of these nanoelements may closely mimic that of their lower frequency (i.e., radio frequency (RF) and microwave) counterparts, even in relatively complex configurations. In addition, we analyze here in detail the concepts of nanoinsulators and nanoconnectors in the optical domain, demonstrating how these components may be crucial in minimizing the coupling between adjacent optical nanocircuit elements and in properly connecting different branches of the nanocircuit. The unit nanomodules for lumped nanoelements are introduced as building blocks for more complex nanocircuits at optical frequencies. Numerical simulations of some complex circuit scenarios considering the frequency response of these nanocircuits are presented and discussed in details, showing how practical applications of such optical nanocircuit concepts may indeed be feasible within the current limits of nanotechnology.
  • A Yagi-Uda-like optical nanoantenna concept using resonant core-shell plasmonic particles as its "reflectors" and "directors" is studied numerically. Such particles when placed near an optical dipole source in a certain arrangement may exhibit large induced dipole moments, resulting in shaping the far-field radiation pattern, analogous to the far field of classical Yagi-Uda antennas in the microwave regime. Variation of the ratio of radii in concentric core-shell nanostructure is used to tailor the phase of the polarizabilities of the particles, and consequently the antenna's far-field pattern. The idea of a nanospectrum analyzer is also briefly proposed for molecular spectroscopy.