• Replicability is a fundamental quality of scientific discoveries: we are interested in those signals that are detectable in different laboratories, study populations, across time etc. Testing a partial conjunction (PC) hypothesis is a statistical procedure aimed specifically to identify the signals that are independently discovered in multiple studies, unlike meta-analysis which accounts for experimental variability but does not require for an effect to be significantly detected multiple times. In many contemporary applications, ex. high-throughput genetics experiments, a large number $M$ of partial conjunction hypotheses are tested simultaneously, calling for a multiple comparison correction. However, standard multiple testing adjustments for the $M$ individual partial conjunction $p$-values can be severely conservative, especially when $M$ is large and the signal is sparse. This is due to the fact that partial conjunction is a composite null. We introduce AdaFilter, a new multiple testing procedure that increases power by adaptively filtering out unlikely candidates of partial conjunction hypotheses. We show that the simultaneous error rates can be controlled as long as data across studies are independent. We find that AdaFilter has much higher power than unfiltered partial conjunction tests and an empirical Bayes method (repfdr). We illustrate the application of the AdaFilter procedures on microarray studies of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and on GWAS for metabolomics.
  • Instrumental variable analysis is a widely used method to estimate causal effects in the presence of unmeasured confounding. When the instruments, exposure and outcome are not measured in the same sample, Angrist and Krueger (1992) suggested to use two-sample instrumental variable (TSIV) estimators that use sample moments from an instrument-exposure sample and an instrument-outcome sample. However, this method is biased if the two samples are from heterogeneous populations so that the distributions of the instruments are different. In linear structural equation models, we derive a new class of TSIV estimators that are robust to heterogeneous samples under the key assumption that the structural relations in the two samples are the same. The widely used two-sample two-stage least squares estimator belongs to this class. It is generally not asymptotically efficient, although we find that it performs similarly to the optimal TSIV estimator in most practical situations. We then attempt to relax the linearity assumption. We find that, unlike one-sample analyses, the TSIV estimator is not robust to misspecified exposure model. Additionally, to nonparametrically identify the magnitude of the causal effect, the noise in the exposure must have the same distributions in the two samples. However, this assumption is in general untestable because the exposure is not observed in one sample. Nonetheless, we may still identify the sign of the causal effect in the absence of homogeneity of the noise.
  • Mendelian randomization (MR) is an instrumental variable method of estimating the causal effect of risk exposures in epidemiology, where genetic variants are used as instruments. With the increasing availability of large-scale genome-wide association studies, it is now possible to greatly improve the power of MR by using genetic variants that are only weakly relevant. We consider how to increase the efficiency of Mendelian randomization by a genome-wide design where more than a thousand genetic instruments are used. An empirical partially Bayes estimator is proposed, where weaker instruments are shrunken more heavily and thus brings less variation to the MR estimate. This is generally more efficient than the profile-likelihood-based estimator which gives no shrinkage to weak instruments. We apply our method to estimate the causal effect of blood lipids on cardiovascular diseases. We find high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) has a significantly protective effect on heart diseases, while previous MR studies reported null findings.
  • Mendelian randomization (MR) is a method of exploiting genetic variation to unbiasedly estimate a causal effect in presence of unmeasured confounding. MR is being widely used in epidemiology and other related areas of population science. In this paper, we study statistical inference in the increasingly popular two-sample summary-data MR design. We show a linear model for the observed associations approximately holds in a wide variety of settings when all the genetic variants satisfy the exclusion restriction assumption, or in genetic terms, when there is no pleiotropy. In this scenario, we derive a maximum profile likelihood estimator with provable consistency and asymptotic normality. However, through analyzing real datasets, we find strong evidence of both systematic and idiosyncratic pleiotropy in MR, echoing some recent discoveries in statistical genetics. We model the systematic pleiotropy by a random effects model, where no genetic variant satisfies the exclusion restriction condition exactly. In this case we propose a consistent and asymptotically normal estimator by adjusting the profile score. We then tackle the idiosyncratic pleiotropy by robustifying the adjusted profile score. We demonstrate the robustness and efficiency of the proposed methods using several simulated and real datasets.
  • Meta-analysis combines results from multiple studies aiming to increase power in finding their common effect. It would typically reject the null hypothesis of no effect if any one of the studies shows strong significance. The partial conjunction null hypothesis is rejected only when at least $r$ of $n$ component hypotheses are non-null with $r = 1$ corresponding to a usual meta-analysis. Compared with meta-analysis, it can encourage replicable findings across studies. A by-product of it when applied to different $r$ values is a confidence interval of $r$ quantifying the proportion of non-null studies. Benjamini and Heller (2008) provided a valid test for the partial conjunction null by ignoring the $r - 1$ smallest p-values and applying a valid meta-analysis p-value to the remaining $n - r + 1$ p-values. We provide sufficient and necessary conditions of admissible combined p-value for the partial conjunction hypothesis among monotone tests. Non-monotone tests always dominate monotone tests but are usually too unreasonable to be used in practice. Based on these findings, we propose a generalized form of Benjamini and Heller's test which allows usage of various types of meta-analysis p-values, and apply our method to an example in assessing replicable benefit of new anticoagulants across subgroups of patients for stroke prevention.
  • We consider large-scale studies in which thousands of significance tests are performed simultaneously. In some of these studies, the multiple testing procedure can be severely biased by latent confounding factors such as batch effects and unmeasured covariates that correlate with both primary variable(s) of interest (e.g. treatment variable, phenotype) and the outcome. Over the past decade, many statistical methods have been proposed to adjust for the confounders in hypothesis testing. We unify these methods in the same framework, generalize them to include multiple primary variables and multiple nuisance variables, and analyze their statistical properties. In particular, we provide theoretical guarantees for RUV-4 and LEAPP, which correspond to two different identification conditions in the framework: the first requires a set of "negative controls" that are known a priori to follow the null distribution; the second requires the true non-nulls to be sparse. Two different estimators which are based on RUV-4 and LEAPP are then applied to these two scenarios. We show that if the confounding factors are strong, the resulting estimators can be asymptotically as powerful as the oracle estimator which observes the latent confounding factors. For hypothesis testing, we show the asymptotic z-tests based on the estimators can control the type I error. Numerical experiments show that the false discovery rate is also controlled by the Benjamini-Hochberg procedure when the sample size is reasonably large.