• The host star metallicity provide a measure of the conditions in protoplanetary disks at the time of planet formation. Using a sample of over 20,000 Kepler stars with spectroscopic metallicities from the LAMOST survey, we explore how the exoplanet population depends on host star metallicity as a function of orbital period and planet size. We find that exoplanets with orbital periods less than 10 days are preferentially found around metal-rich stars ([Fe/H]~ 0.15 +- 0.05 dex). The occurrence rates of these hot exoplanets increases to ~30% for super-solar metallicity stars from ~10% for stars with a sub-solar metallicity. Cooler exoplanets, that resides at longer orbital periods and constitute the bulk of the exoplanet population with an occurrence rate of >~ 90%, have host-star metallicities consistent with solar. At short orbital periods, P<10 days, the difference in host star metallicity is largest for hot rocky planets (<1.7 R_Earth), where the metallicity difference is [Fe/H] =~ 0.25 +- 0.07 dex. The excess of hot rocky planets around metal-rich stars implies they either share a formation mechanism with hot Jupiters, or trace a planet trap at the protoplanetary disk inner edge which is metallicity-dependent. We do not find statistically significant evidence for a previously identified trend that small planets toward the habitable zone are preferentially found around low-metallicity stars. Refuting or confirming this trend requires a larger sample of spectroscopic metallicities.
  • In our 2013 Astronomical Review article, we discussed the statistics of variability for 633 faint spectral type A-F stars observed by the Kepler spacecraft during Quarters 6-13. We found six stars that showed no variability with amplitude 20 ppm or greater in the range 0.2 to 24.4 cycles/day, but whose positions in the log g--Teff diagram place them in the delta Sct or gamma Dor pulsation instability regions established from pre-Kepler ground-based observations. Here we present results for 2137 additional stars observed during Quarters 14-17, and find 34 stars that lie within the instability regions. In Paper I, we included a +229 K offset to the Kepler Input Catalog Teff to take into account an average systematic difference between the KIC values and the Teff derived from SDSS color photometry for main-sequence F stars (Pinsonneault et al. 2012). Here we compare the KIC Teff value and the Teff derived from spectroscopy taken by the LAMOST instrument (Molenda-Zakowicz et al. 2013, 2014) for 54 stars common to both samples. We find no trend to support applying the offset, but instead find that a small average temperature decrease relative to the KIC Teff may be more appropriate for the stars in our spectral-type range. If the offset is omitted, only 17 of our 34 `constant' stars fall within the instability regions. For the two `constant' stars also observed by LAMOST, the LAMOST Teff values are cooler than the KIC Teff by several hundred K, and would move these stars out of the instability regions. It is possible that a more accurate determination of their Teff and log g would move some of the other `constant' stars out of the instability regions. However, if average (random) errors in Teff are taken into account, 15 to 52 stars may still persist within the instability regions. Explanations for these `constant' stars, both theoretical and observational, remain to be investigated.
  • The Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) at the Xinglong observatory in China is a new 4-m telescope equipped with 4,000 optical fibers. In 2010, we initiated the LAMOST-Kepler project. We requested to observe the full field-of-view of the nominal Kepler mission with the LAMOST to collect low-resolution spectra for as many objects from the KIC10 catalogue as possible. So far, 12 of the 14 requested LAMOST fields have been observed resulting in more than 68,000 low-resolution spectra. Our preliminary results show that the stellar parameters derived from the LAMOST spectra are in good agreement with those found in the literature based on high-resolution spectroscopy. The LAMOST data allows to distinguish dwarfs from giants and can provide the projected rotational velocity for very fast rotators.
  • The NASA space telescope Kepler has provided unprecedented time-series observations which have revolutionised the field of asteroseismology, i.e. the use of stellar oscillations to probe the interior of stars. The Kepler-data include observations of stars in open clusters, which are particularly interesting for asteroseismology. One of the clusters observed with Kepler is NGC 6811, which is the target of the present paper. However, apart from high-precision time-series observations, sounding the interiors of stars in open clusters by means of asteroseismology also requires accurate and precise atmospheric parameters as well as cluster membership indicators for the individual stars. We use medium-resolution (R~25,000) spectroscopic observations, and three independent analysis methods, to derive effective temperatures, surface gravities, metallicities, projected rotational velocities and radial velocities, for 15 stars in the field of the open cluster NGC 6811. We discover two double-lined and three single-lined spectroscopic binaries. Eight stars are classified as either certain or very probable cluster members, and three stars are classified as non-members. For four stars, cluster membership could not been assessed. Five of the observed stars are G-type giants which are located in the colour-magnitude diagram in the region of the red clump of the cluster. Two of these stars are surely identified as red clump stars for the first time. For those five stars, we provide chemical abundances of 31 elements. The mean radial-velocity of NGC 6811 is found to be +6.68$\pm$0.08 km s$^{-1}$ and the mean metallicity and overall abundance pattern are shown to be very close to solar with an exception of Ba which we find to be overabundant.
  • We present a catalog of revised effective temperatures for stars observed in long-cadence mode in the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). We use SDSS griz filters tied to the fundamental temperature scale. Polynomials for griz color-temperature relations are presented, along with correction terms for surface gravity effects, metallicity, and statistical corrections for binary companions or blending. We compare our temperature scale to the published infrared flux method (IRFM) scale for VJKs in both open clusters and the Kepler fields. We find good agreement overall, with some deviations between (J - Ks)-based temperatures from the IRFM and both SDSS filter and other diagnostic IRFM color-temperature relationships above 6000 K. For field dwarfs we find a mean shift towards hotter temperatures relative to the KIC, of order 215 K, in the regime where the IRFM scale is well-defined (4000 K to 6500 K). This change is of comparable magnitude in both color systems and in spectroscopy for stars with Teff below 6000 K. Systematic differences between temperature estimators appear for hotter stars, and we define corrections to put the SDSS temperatures on the IRFM scale for them. When the theoretical dependence on gravity is accounted for we find a similar temperature scale offset between the fundamental and KIC scales for giants. We demonstrate that statistical corrections to color-based temperatures from binaries are significant. Typical errors, mostly from uncertainties in extinction, are of order 100 K. Implications for other applications of the KIC are discussed.
  • We present Kepler observations of the bright (V=8.3), oscillating star HD 179070. The observations show transit-like events which reveal that the star is orbited every 2.8 days by a small, 1.6 R_Earth object. Seismic studies of HD 179070 using short cadence Kepler observations show that HD 179070 has a frequencypower spectrum consistent with solar-like oscillations that are acoustic p-modes. Asteroseismic analysis provides robust values for the mass and radius of HD 179070, 1.34{\pm}0.06 M{\circ} and 1.86{\pm}0.04 R{\circ} respectively, as well as yielding an age of 2.84{\pm}0.34 Gyr for this F5 subgiant. Together with ground-based follow-up observations, analysis of the Kepler light curves and image data, and blend scenario models, we conservatively show at the >99.7% confidence level (3{\sigma}) that the transit event is caused by a 1.64{\pm}0.04 R_Earth exoplanet in a 2.785755{\pm}0.000032 day orbit. The exoplanet is only 0.04 AU away from the star and our spectroscopic observations provide an upper limit to its mass of ~10 M_Earth (2-{\sigma}). HD 179070 is the brightest exoplanet host star yet discovered by Kepler.
  • Stellar structure and evolution can be studied in great detail by asteroseismic methods, provided data of high precision are available. We determine the effective temperature (Teff), surface gravity (log g), metallicity, and the projected rotational velocity (v sin i) of 44 Kepler asteroseismic targets using our high-resolution (R > 20,000) spectroscopic observations; these parameters will then be used to compute asteroseismic models of these stars and to interpret the Kepler light curves.We use the method of cross correlation to measure the radial velocity (RV) of our targets, while atmospheric parameters are derived using the ROTFIT code and spectral synthesis method. We discover three double-lined spectroscopic binaries, HIP 94924, HIP 95115, and HIP 97321 - for the last system, we provide the orbital solution, and we report two suspected single-lined spectroscopic binaries, HIP94112 and HIP 96062. For all stars from our sample we derive RV, v sin i, Teff, log g, and metallicity, and for six stars, we perform a detailed abundance analysis. A spectral classification is done for 33 targets. Finally, we show that the early-type star HIP 94472 is rotating slowly (v sin i = 13 kms/1) and we confirm its classification to the Am spectral type which makes it an interesting and promising target for asteroseismic modeling. The comparison of the results reported in this paper with the information in the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC) shows an urgent need for verification and refinement of the atmospheric parameters listed in the KIC. That refinement is crucial for making a full use of the data delivered by Kepler and can be achieved only by a detailed ground-based study.
  • We present results of our 5-years-long program of ground-based spectroscopic and photometric observations of individual Kepler asteroseismic targets and the open clusters NGC6866 and NGC6811 from the Kepler field of view.We determined the effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, the projected rotational velocity and the radial velocity of 119 Kepler asteroseismic targets for which we acquired high-resolution spectra. For many of these stars the derived atmospheric parameters agree with Teff, log g, and [Fe/H] from the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC) to within their error bars. Only for stars hotter than 7000K we notice significant differences between the effective temperature derived from spectroscopy and Teff given in the KIC. For 19 stars which we observed photoelectrically, we measured the interstellar reddening and we found it to be negligible. Finally, our discovery of the delta Sct and gamma Dor pulsating stars in the open cluster NGC6866 allowed us to discuss the frequency of the occurrence of gamma Dor stars in the open clusters of different age and metallicity and show that there are no correlations between these parameters.
  • We report on the ground-based follow-up program of spectroscopic and photometric observations of solar-like asteroseismic targets for the Kepler space mission. These stars constitute a large group of more than thousand objects which are the subject of an intensive study of the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium Working Group 1 (KASC WG-1). The main goal of this coordinated research is the determination of the fundamental stellar atmospheric parameters, which are used for the computing of their asteroseismic models, as well as for the verification of the Kepler Input Catalogue (KIC).
  • Asteroseismology of stars in clusters has been a long-sought goal because the assumption of a common age, distance and initial chemical composition allows strong tests of the theory of stellar evolution. We report results from the first 34 days of science data from the Kepler Mission for the open cluster NGC 6819 -- one of four clusters in the field of view. We obtain the first clear detections of solar-like oscillations in the cluster red giants and are able to measure the large frequency separation and the frequency of maximum oscillation power. We find that the asteroseismic parameters allow us to test cluster-membership of the stars, and even with the limited seismic data in hand, we can already identify four possible non-members despite their having a better than 80% membership probability from radial velocity measurements. We are also able to determine the oscillation amplitudes for stars that span about two orders of magnitude in luminosity and find good agreement with the prediction that oscillation amplitudes scale as the luminosity to the power of 0.7. These early results demonstrate the unique potential of asteroseismology of the stellar clusters observed by Kepler.