• The existence of a light or massive scalar field with a coupling to matter weaker than gravitational strength is a possible source of violation of the weak equivalence principle. We use the first results on the E\"otv\"os parameter by the MICROSCOPE experiment to set new constraints on such scalar fields. For a massive scalar field of mass smaller than $10^{-12}$ eV (i.e. range larger than a few $10^5$ m) we improve existing constraints by one order of magnitude to $|\alpha|<10^{-11}$ if the scalar field couples to the baryon number and to $|\alpha|<10^{-12}$ if the scalar field couples to the difference between the baryon and the lepton numbers. We also consider a model describing the coupling of a generic dilaton to the standard matter fields with five parameters, for a light field: we find that for masses smaller than $10^{-12}$eV, the constraints on the dilaton coupling parameters are improved by one order of magnitude compared to previous equivalence principle tests.
  • According to the Weak Equivalence Principle, all bodies should fall at the same rate in a gravitational field. The MICROSCOPE satellite, launched in April 2016, aims to test its validity at the $10^{-15}$ precision level, by measuring the force required to maintain two test masses (of titanium and platinum alloys) exactly in the same orbit. A non-vanishing result would correspond to a violation of the Equivalence Principle, or to the discovery of a new long-range force. Analysis of the first data gives $\delta\rm{(Ti,Pt)}= [-1 \pm 9 (\mathrm{stat}) \pm 9 (\mathrm{syst})] \times 10^{-15}$ (1$\sigma$ statistical uncertainty) for the titanium-platinum E\"otv\"os parameter characterizing the relative difference in their free-fall accelerations.
  • The MICROSCOPE space mission, launched on April 25, 2016, aims to test the weak equivalence principle (WEP) with a 10^-15 precision. To reach this performance requires an accurate and robust data analysis method, especially since the possible WEP violation signal will be dominated by a strongly colored noise. An important complication is brought by the fact that some values will be missing -therefore, the measured time series will not be strictly regularly sampled. Those missing values induce a spectral leakage that significantly increases the noise in Fourier space, where the WEP violation signal is looked for, thereby complicating scientific returns. Recently, we developed an inpainting algorithm to correct the MICROSCOPE data for missing values. This code has been integrated in the official MICROSCOPE data processing pipeline because it enables us to significantly measure an equivalence principle violation (EPV) signal in a model-independent way, in the inertial satellite configuration. In this work, we present several improvements to the method that may allow us now to reach the MICROSCOPE requirements for both inertial and spin satellite configurations. The main improvement has been obtained using a prior on the power spectrum of the colored-noise that can be directly derived from the incomplete data. We show that after reconstructing missing values with this new algorithm, a least-squares fit may allow us to significantly measure an EPV signal with a 0.96x10^-15 precision in the inertial mode and 1.2x10^-15 precision in the spin mode. Although, the inpainting method presented in this paper has been optimized to the MICROSCOPE data, it remains sufficiently general to be used in the general context of missing data in time series dominated by an unknown colored-noise. The improved inpainting software, called ICON, is freely available at http://www.cosmostat.org/software/icon.
  • We present a Gaussian regression method for time series with missing data and stationary residuals of unknown power spectral density (PSD). The missing data are efficiently estimated by their conditional expectation as in universal Kriging, based on the circulant approximation of the complete data covariance. After initialization with an autoregessive fit of the noise, a few iterations of estimation/reconstruction steps are performed until convergence of the regression and PSD estimates, in a way similar to the expectation-conditional-maximization algorithm. The estimation can be performed for an arbitrary PSD provided that it is sufficiently smooth. The algorithm is developed in the framework of the MICROSCOPE space mission whose goal is to test the weak equivalence principle (WEP) with a precision of $10^{-15}$. We show by numerical simulations that the developed method allows us to meet three major requirements: to maintain the targeted precision of the WEP test in spite of the loss of data, to calculate a reliable estimate of this precision and of the noise level, and finally to provide consistent and faithful reconstructed data to the scientific community.
  • Missing data are a common problem in experimental and observational physics. They can be caused by various sources, either an instrument's saturation, or a contamination from an external event, or a data loss. In particular, they can have a disastrous effect when one is seeking to characterize a colored-noise-dominated signal in Fourier space, since they create a spectral leakage that can artificially increase the noise. It is therefore important to either take them into account or to correct for them prior to e.g. a Least-Square fit of the signal to be characterized. In this paper, we present an application of the {\it inpainting} algorithm to mock MICROSCOPE data; {\it inpainting} is based on a sparsity assumption, and has already been used in various astrophysical contexts; MICROSCOPE is a French Space Agency mission, whose launch is expected in 2016, that aims to test the Weak Equivalence Principle down to the $10^{-15}$ level. We then explore the {\it inpainting} dependence on the number of gaps and the total fraction of missing values. We show that, in a worst-case scenario, after reconstructing missing values with {\it inpainting}, a Least-Square fit may allow us to significantly measure a $1.1\times10^{-15}$ Equivalence Principle violation signal, which is sufficiently close to the MICROSCOPE requirements to implement {\it inpainting} in the official MICROSCOPE data processing and analysis pipeline. Together with the previously published KARMA method, {\it inpainting} will then allow us to independently characterize and cross-check an Equivalence Principle violation signal detection down to the $10^{-15}$ level.
  • MICROSCOPE is a French Space Agency mission that aims to test the Weak Equivalence Principle in space down to an accuracy of $10^{-15}$. This is two orders of magnitude better than the current constraints, which will allow us to test General Relativity as well as theories beyond General Relativity which predict a possible Weak Equivalence Principle violation below $10^{-13}$. In this communication, we describe the MICROSCOPE mission, its measurement principle and instrument, and we give an update on its status. After a successful instrument's commissioning, MICROSCOPE is on track for on-schedule launch, expected in 2016.
  • Simulated wide-field images are becoming an important part of observational astronomy, either to prepare for new surveys or to test measurement methods. In order to efficiently explore vast parameter spaces, the computational speed of simulation codes is a central requirement to their implementation. We introduce the Ultra Fast Image Generator (UFig) which aims to bring wide-field imaging simulations to the current limits of computational capabilities. We achieve this goal through: (1) models of galaxies, stars and observational conditions, which, while simple, capture the key features necessary for realistic simulations, and (2) state-of-the-art computational and implementation optimizations. We present the performances of UFig and show that it is faster than existing public simulation codes by several orders of magnitude. It allows us to produce images more quickly than SExtractor needs to analyze them. For instance, it can simulate a typical 0.25 deg^2 Subaru SuprimeCam image (10k x 8k pixels) with a 5-sigma limiting magnitude of R=26 in 30 seconds on a laptop, yielding an average simulation time for a galaxy of 30 microseconds. This code is complementary to end-to-end simulation codes and can be used as a fast, central component of observational methods relying on simulations.
  • We present a method for attaining sub-arcsecond pointing stability during sub- orbital balloon flights, as designed for in the High Altitude Lensing Observatory (HALO) concept. The pointing method presented here has the potential to perform near-space quality optical astronomical imaging at 1-2% of the cost of space-based missions. We also discuss an architecture that can achieve sufficient thermomechanical stability to match the pointing stability. This concept is motivated by advances in the development and testing of Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) flights which promise to allow observation campaigns lasting more than three months. The design incorporates a multi-stage pointing architecture comprising: a gondola coarse azimuth control system, a multi-axis nested gimbal frame structure with arcsecond stability, a telescope de-rotator to eliminate field rotation, and a fine guidance stage consisting of both a telescope mounted angular rate sensor and guide CCDs in the focal plane to drive a fast-steering mirror. We discuss the results of pointing tests together with a preliminary thermo-mechanical analysis required for sub-arcsecond pointing at high altitude. Possible future applications in the areas of wide-field surveys and exoplanet searches are also discussed.
  • In the theory of structure formation, galaxies are biased tracers of the underlying matter density field. The statistical relation between galaxy and matter density field is commonly referred as galaxy bias. In this paper, we test the linear bias model with weak-lensing and galaxy clustering measurements in the 2 square degrees COSMOS field (Scoville et al. 2007). We estimate the bias of galaxies between redshifts z=0.2 and z=1, and over correlation scales between R=0.2 h^-1 Mpc and R=15 h^-1 Mpc. We focus on three galaxy samples, selected in flux (simultaneous cuts I_814W < 26.5 and K_s < 24), and in stellar-mass (10^9 < M_* < 10^10 h^-2 Msun and 10^10 < M^*< 10^11 h^-2 Msun). At scales R > 2 h^-1 Mpc, our measurements support a model of bias increasing with redshift. The Tinker et al. (2010) fitting function provides a good fit to the data. We find the best fit mass of the galaxy halos to be log(M_200 h^-1 Msun) = 11.7^+0.6_-1.3 and log(M_200 h^-1 Msun) = 12.4^+0.2_-2.9 respectively for the low and high stellar-mass samples. In the halo model framework, bias is scale-dependent with a change of slope at the transition scale between the one and the two halo terms. We detect a scale-dependence of bias with a turn-down at scale R=2.3\pm1.5 h^-1 Mpc, in agreement with previous galaxy clustering studies. We find no significant amount of stochasticity, suggesting that a linear bias model is sufficient to describe our data. We use N-body simulations to quantify both the amount of cosmic variance and systematic errors in the measurement.
  • Point Spread Function (PSF) modeling is a central part of any astronomy data analysis relying on measuring the shapes of objects. It is especially crucial for weak gravitational lensing, in order to beat down systematics and allow one to reach the full potential of weak lensing in measuring dark energy. A PSF modeling pipeline is made of two main steps: the first one is to assess its shape on stars, and the second is to interpolate it at any desired position (usually galaxies). We focus on the second part, and compare different interpolation schemes, including polynomial interpolation, radial basis functions, Delaunay triangulation and Kriging. For that purpose, we develop simulations of PSF fields, in which stars are built from a set of basis functions defined from a Principal Components Analysis of a real ground-based image. We find that Kriging gives the most reliable interpolation, significantly better than the traditionally used polynomial interpolation. We also note that although a Kriging interpolation on individual images is enough to control systematics at the level necessary for current weak lensing surveys, more elaborate techniques will have to be developed to reach future ambitious surveys' requirements.
  • We compare the efficiency of weak lensing-selected galaxy clusters counts and of the weak lensing bispectrum at capturing non-Gaussian features in the dark matter distribution. We use the halo model to compute the weak lensing power spectrum, the bispectrum and the expected number of detected clusters, and derive constraints on cosmological parameters for a large, low systematic weak lensing survey, by focusing on the $\Omega_m$-$\sigma_8$ plane and on the dark energy equation of state. We separate the power spectrum into the resolved and the unresolved parts of the data, the resolved part being defined as detected clusters, and the unresolved part as the rest of the field. We consider four kinds of clusters counts, taking into account different amount of information : signal-to-noise ratio peak counts; counts as a function of clusters' mass; counts as a function of clusters' redshift; and counts as a function of clusters' mass and redshift. We show that when combined with the power spectrum, those four kinds of counts provide similar constraints, thus allowing one to perform the most direct counts, signal-to-noise peaks counts, and get percent level constraints on cosmological parameters. We show that the weak lensing bispectrum gives constraints comparable to those given by the power spectrum and captures non-Gaussian features as well as clusters counts, its combination with the power spectrum giving errors on cosmological parameters that are similar to, if not marginally smaller than, those obtained when combining the power spectrum with cluster counts. We finally note that in order to reach its potential, the weak lensing bispectrum must be computed using all triangle configurations, as equilateral triangles alone do not provide useful information.
  • The GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing 2008 (GREAT08) Challenge focuses on a problem that is of crucial importance for future observations in cosmology. The shapes of distant galaxies can be used to determine the properties of dark energy and the nature of gravity, because light from those galaxies is bent by gravity from the intervening dark matter. The observed galaxy images appear distorted, although only slightly, and their shapes must be precisely disentangled from the effects of pixelisation, convolution and noise. The worldwide gravitational lensing community has made significant progress in techniques to measure these distortions via the Shear TEsting Program (STEP). Via STEP, we have run challenges within our own community, and come to recognise that this particular image analysis problem is ideally matched to experts in statistical inference, inverse problems and computational learning. Thus, in order to continue the progress seen in recent years, we are seeking an infusion of new ideas from these communities. This document details the GREAT08 Challenge for potential participants. Please visit http://www.great08challenge.info for the latest information.
  • We present a joint weak lensing and X-ray analysis of 4 deg$^2$ from the CFHTLS and XMM-LSS surveys. Our weak lensing analysis is the first analysis of a real survey using shapelets, a new generation weak lensing analysis method. We create projected mass maps of the images, and extract 6 weak-lensing-detected clusters of galaxies. We show that their counts can be used to constrain the power spectrum normalisation $\sigma_8 =0.92_{-0.30}^{+0.26}$ for $\Omega_m=0.24$. We show that despite the large scatter generally observed in the M-T relation derived from lensing masses, tight constraints on both its slope and normalisation $M_*$ can be obtained with a moderate number of sources provided that the covered mass range is large enough. Adding clusters from Bardeau et al. (2007) to our sample, we measure $M_* = 2.71_{-0.61}^{+0.79} 10^{14} h^{-1} M_\odot$. Although they are dominated by shot noise and sample variance, our measurements are consistent with currently favoured values, and set the stage for future surveys. We thus investigate the dependence of those estimates on survey size, depth, and integration time, for joint weak lensing and X-ray surveys. We show that deep surveys should be dedicated to the study of the physics of clusters and groups of galaxies. For a given exposure time, wide surveys provide a larger number of detected clusters and are therefore preferred for the measurement of cosmological parameters such as $\sigma_8$ and $M_*$. We show that a wide survey of a few hundred square degrees is needed to improve upon current measurements of these parameters. More ambitious surveys covering 7000 deg$^2$ will provide the 1% accuracy in the estimation of the power spectrum and the M-T relation normalisations.
  • We derive expressions, in terms of "polar shapelets", for the image distortion operations associated with weak gravitational lensing. Shear causes galaxy shapes to become elongated, and is sensitive to the second derivative of the projected gravitational potential along their line of sight; flexion bends galaxy shapes into arcs, and is sensitive to the third derivative. Polar shapelets provide a natural representation, in which both shear and flexion transformations are compact. Through this tool, we understand progress in several weak lensing methods. We then exploit various symmetries of shapelets to construct a range of shear estimators with useful properties. Through an analogous investigation, we also explore several flexion estimators. In particular, some of the estimators can be measured simultaneously and independently for every galaxy, and will provide unique checks for systematics in future weak lensing analyses. Using simulated images from the Shear TEsting Programme (STEP), we show that we can recover input shears with no significant bias. A complete software package to parametrize astronomical images in terms of polar shapelets, and to perform a full weak lensing analysis, is available at http://www.astro.caltech.edu/~rjm/shapelets/ .
  • We present a three dimensional cosmic shear analysis of the Hubble Space Telescope COSMOS survey, the largest ever optical imaging program performed in space. We have measured the shapes of galaxies for the tell-tale distortions caused by weak gravitational lensing, and traced the growth of that signal as a function of redshift. Using both 2D and 3D analyses, we measure cosmological parameters Omega_m, the density of matter in the universe, and sigma_8, the normalization of the matter power spectrum. The introduction of redshift information tightens the constraints by a factor of three, and also reduces the relative sampling (or "cosmic") variance compared to recent surveys that may be larger but are only two dimensional. From the 3D analysis, we find sigma_8*(Omega_m/0.3)^0.44=0.866+^0.085_-0.068 at 68% confidence limits, including both statistical and potential systematic sources of error in the total budget. Indeed, the absolute calibration of shear measurement methods is now the dominant source of uncertainty. Assuming instead a baseline cosmology to fix the geometry of the universe, we have measured the growth of structure on both linear and non-linear physical scales. Our results thus demonstrate a proof of concept for tomographic analysis techniques that have been proposed for future weak lensing surveys by a dedicated wide-field telescope in space.
  • The Shear TEsting Programme (STEP) is a collaborative project to improve the accuracy and reliability of weak lensing measurement, in preparation for the next generation of wide-field surveys. We review sixteen current and emerging shear measurement methods in a common language, and assess their performance by running them (blindly) on simulated images that contain a known shear signal. We determine the common features of algorithms that most successfully recover the input parameters. We achieve previously unattained discriminatory precision in our analysis, via a combination of more extensive simulations, and pairs of galaxy images that have been rotated with respect to each other, thus removing noise from their intrinsic ellipticities. The robustness of our simulation approach is also confirmed by testing the relative calibration of methods on real data. Weak lensing measurement has improved since the first STEP paper. Several methods now consistently achieve better than 2% precision, and are still being developed. However, the simulations can now distinguish all methods from perfect performance. Our main concern continues to be the potential for a multiplicative shear calibration bias: not least because this can not be internally calibrated with real data. We determine which galaxy populations are responsible and, by adjusting the simulated observing conditions, we also investigate the effects of instrumental and atmospheric parameters. We have isolated several previously unrecognised aspects of galaxy shape measurement, in which focussed development could provide further progress towards the sub-percent level of precision desired for future surveys. [ABRIDGED]
  • The Shear TEsting Programme, STEP, is a collaborative project to improve the accuracy and reliability of all weak lensing measurements in preparation for the next generation of wide-field surveys. In this first STEP paper we present the results of a blind analysis of simulated ground-based observations of relatively simple galaxy morphologies. The most successful methods are shown to achieve percent level accuracy. From the cosmic shear pipelines that have been used to constrain cosmology, we find weak lensing shear measured to an accuracy that is within the statistical errors of current weak lensing analyses, with shear measurements accurate to better than 7%. The dominant source of measurement error is shown to arise from calibration uncertainties where the measured shear is over or under-estimated by a constant multiplicative factor. This is of concern as calibration errors cannot be detected through standard diagnostic tests. The measured calibration errors appear to result from stellar contamination, false object detection, the shear measurement method itself, selection bias and/or the use of biased weights. Additive systematics (false detections of shear) resulting from residual point-spread function anisotropy are, in most cases, reduced to below an equivalent shear of 0.001, an order of magnitude below cosmic shear distortions on the scales probed by current surveys. Our results provide a snapshot view of the accuracy of current ground-based weak lensing methods and a benchmark upon which we can improve. To this end we provide descriptions of each method tested and include details of the eight different implementations of the commonly used Kaiser, Squires and Broadhurst (1995) method (KSB+) to aid the improvement of future KSB+ analyses.
  • We use the non-linear spherical model in cold dark matter (CDM) cosmologies with dark energy to investigate the effects of dark energy on the growth of structure and the formation of virialised structures. We consider dark energy models with a constant equation of state parameter w. For -1<w<-1/3, clusters form earlier and are more concentrated in quintessence than in LambdaCDM models, but they form later and are less concentrated than in the corresponding open model with the same matter density and no dark energy. We point out some confusion in the literature around the expression of the collapse factor (ratio of the radius of the sphere at virialisation to that at turn-around) derived from the virial theorem. We use the Sheth & Tormen extension of the Press-Schechter framework to calculate the evolution of the cluster abundance in different models and show the sensitivity of the cluster abundance to both the amplitude of the mass fluctuations, sigma8, and the sigma8-w normalisation, selected to match either the cosmic microwave background observations or the abundance of X-ray clusters.