• We have performed a comprehensive study of the UV emission detected from AGB stars by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX). Of the 468 AGB stars in our sample, 316 were observed by GALEX. In the NUV bandpass ($\lambda_{\rm eff} \sim 2310$z A), 179 AGB stars were detected and 137 were not detected. Only 38 AGB stars were detected in the FUV bandpass ($\lambda_{\rm eff} \sim1528$ A). We find that NUV emission is correlated with optical to near infrared emission leading to higher detection fractions among the brightest, hence closest, AGB stars. Comparing the AGB time-variable visible phased light curves to corresponding GALEX NUV phased light curves we find evidence that for some AGB stars the NUV emission varies in phase with the visible light curves. We also find evidence that the NUV emission, and possibly, the FUV emission are anti-correlated with the circumstellar envelope density. These results suggest that the origin of the GALEX-detected UV emission is an inherent characteristic of the AGB stars that can most likely be traced to a combination of photospheric and chromospheric emission. In most cases, UV detections of AGB stars are not likely to be indicative of the presence of binary companions.
  • The Galex Nearby Young Star Survey (GALNYSS) has yielded a sample of $\sim$2000 UV-selected objects that are candidate nearby ($D \stackrel{<}{\sim}$150 pc), young (age $\sim$10--100 Myr), late-type stars. Here, we evaluate the distances and ages of the subsample of (19) GALNYSS stars with Gaia Data Release 1 (DR1) parallax distances $D \le 120$ pc. The overall youth of these 19 mid-K to early-M stars is readily apparent from their positions relative to the loci of main sequence stars and giants in Gaia-based color-magnitude and color-color diagrams constructed for all Galex- and WISE-detected stars with parallax measurements included in DR1. The isochronal ages of all 19 stars lie in the range $\sim$10--100 Myr. Comparison with Li-based age estimates indicates a handful of these stars may be young main-sequence binaries rather than pre-main sequence stars. Nine of the 19 objects have not previously been considered as nearby, young stars, and all but one of these are found at declinations north of $+$30$^\circ$. The Gaia DR1 results presented here indicate that the GALNYSS sample includes several hundred nearby, young stars, a substantial fraction of which have not been previously recognized as having ages $\stackrel{<}{\sim}$100 Myr.
  • We revisit the nature of large dips in flux from extinction by dusty circumstellar material that is observed by Kepler for many young stars in the Upper Sco and $\rho$ Oph star formation regions. These young, low-mass "dipper" stars are known to have low accretion rates and primarily host moderately evolved dusty circumstellar disks. Young low mass stars often exhibit rotating star spots that cause quasi-periodic photometric variations. We found no evidence for periods associated with the dips that are different from the star spot rotation period in spectrograms constructed from the light curves. The material causing the dips in most of these light curves must be approximately corotating with the star. We find that disk temperatures computed at the disk corotation radius are cool enough that dust should not sublime. Crude estimates for stellar magnetic field strengths and accretion rates are consistent with magnetospheric truncation near the corotation radius. Magnetospheric truncation models can explain why the dips are associated with material near corotation and how dusty material is lifted out of the midplane to obscure the star which would account for the large fraction of young low mass stars that are dippers. We propose that variations in disk orientation angle, stellar magnetic field dipole tilt axis, and disk accretion rate are underlying parameters accounting for differences in the dipper light curves.
  • We have obtained new images of the protoplanetary disk orbiting TW Hya in visible, total intensity light with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), using the newly commissioned BAR5 occulter. These HST/STIS observations achieved an inner working angle $\sim$0.2\arcsec, or 11.7~AU, probing the system at angular radii coincident with recent images of the disk obtained by ALMA and in polarized intensity near-infrared light. By comparing our new STIS images to those taken with STIS in 2000 and with NICMOS in 1998, 2004, and 2005, we demonstrate that TW Hya's azimuthal surface brightness asymmetry moves coherently in position angle. Between 50~AU and 141~AU we measure a constant angular velocity in the azimuthal brightness asymmetry of 22.7$^\circ$~yr$^{-1}$ in a counter-clockwise direction, equivalent to a period of 15.9~yr assuming circular motion. Both the (short) inferred period and lack of radial dependence of the moving shadow pattern are inconsistent with Keplerian rotation at these disk radii. We hypothesize that the asymmetry arises from the fact that the disk interior to 1~AU is inclined and precessing due to a planetary companion, thus partially shadowing the outer disk. Further monitoring of this and other shadows on protoplanetary disks potentially opens a new avenue for indirectly observing the sites of planet formation.
  • To investigate the potential connection between the intense X-ray emission from young, low-mass stars and the lifetimes of their circumstellar, planet-forming disks, we have compiled the X-ray luminosities ($L_X$) of M stars in the $\sim$8 Myr-old TW Hya Association (TWA) for which X-ray data are presently available. Our investigation includes analysis of archival Chandra data for the TWA binary systems TWA 8, 9, and 13. Although our study suffers from poor statistics for stars later than M3, we find a trend of decreasing $L_X/L_{bol}$ with decreasing $T_{eff}$ for TWA M stars wherein the earliest-type (M0--M2) stars cluster near $\log{(L_X/L_{bol})} \approx -3.0$ and then $\log{(L_X/L_{bol})}$ decreases, and its distribution broadens, for types M4 and later. The fraction of TWA stars that display evidence for residual primordial disk material also sharply increases in this same (mid-M) spectral type regime. This apparent anticorrelation between the relative X-ray luminosities of low-mass TWA stars and the longevities of their circumstellar disks suggests that primordial disks orbiting early-type M stars in the TWA have dispersed rapidly as a consequence of their persistent large X-ray fluxes. Conversely, the disks orbiting the very lowest-mass pre-MS stars and pre-MS brown dwarfs in the Association may have survived because their X-ray luminosities and, hence, disk photoevaporation rates are very low to begin with, and then further decline relatively early in their pre-MS evolution.
  • We present Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) adaptive optics near-infrared images of the giant planet-forming regions of the protoplanetary disk orbiting the nearby (D = 54 pc), pre-main sequence (classical T Tauri) star TW Hydrae. The GPI images, which were obtained in coronagraphic/polarimetric mode, exploit starlight scattered off small dust grains to elucidate the surface density structure of the TW Hya disk from 80 AU to within 10 AU of the star at 1.5 AU resolution. The GPI polarized intensity images unambiguously confirm the presence of a gap in the radial surface brightness distribution of the inner disk. The gap is centered near 23 AU, with a width of 5 AU and a depth of 50%. In the context of recent simulations of giant planet formation in gaseous, dusty disks orbiting pre-main sequence stars, these results indicate that at least one young planet with a mass 0.2 M_J could be present in the TW Hya disk at an orbital semi-major axis similar to that of Uranus. If this (proto)planet is actively accreting gas from the disk, it may be readily detectable by GPI or a similarly sensitive, high-resolution infrared imaging system.
  • X-ray observations of pre-main sequence (pre-MS) stars of M-type probe coronal emission and offer a means to investigate magnetic activity at the stellar-substellar boundary. Recent observations of main sequence (MS) stars at this boundary display a decrease in fractional X-ray luminosity ($L_{X}$/$L_{bol}$) by almost two orders of magnitude for spectral types M7 and later. We investigate magnetic activity and search for a decrease in X-ray emission in the pre-MS progenitors of these MS stars. We present XMM-Newton X-ray observations and preliminary results for ~10 nearby (30-70 pc), very low mass pre-MS stars in the relatively unexplored age range of 10-30 Myr. We compare the fractional X-ray luminosities of these 10-30 Myr old stars to younger (1-3 Myr) pre-MS brown dwarfs and find no dependence on spectral type or age suggesting that X-ray activity declines at an age later than ~30 Myr in these very low-mass stars.
  • Low-mass, pre-main sequence stars possess intense high-energy radiation fields as a result of their strong stellar magnetic activity. This stellar UV and X-ray radiation may have a profound impact on the lifetimes of protoplanetary disks. We aim to constrain the X-ray-induced photoevaporation rates of protoplanetary disks orbiting low-mass stars by analyzing serendipitous XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray observations of candidate nearby (D $<$ 100 pc), young (age $<$ 100 Myr) M stars identified in the GALEX Nearby Young-Star Survey (GALNYSS).
  • Beginning with the enigmatic (and now emblematic) TW Hya, the scutiny of individual stars and star-disk systems has both motivated and benefitted from the identification of nearby young moving groups (NYMGs). I briefly outline the emergence of this relatively new subfield of astronomy over the past two decades, and offer a few examples illustrating how the study of NYMGs and their members enables unique investigations of pre-main sequence stellar evolution, evolved protoplanetary disks, and young exoplanets.
  • We have carried out an ALMA survey of 15 confirmed or candidate low-mass (<0.2M$_\odot$) members of the TW Hya Association (TWA) with the goal of detecting molecular gas in the form of CO emission, as well as providing constraints on continuum emission due to cold dust. Our targets have spectral types of M4-L0 and hence represent the extreme low end of the TWA's mass function. Our ALMA survey has yielded detections of 1.3mm continuum emission around 4 systems (TWA 30B, 32, 33, & 34), suggesting the presence of cold dust grains. All continuum sources are unresolved. TWA 34 further shows 12CO(2-1) emission whose velocity structure is indicative of Keplerian rotation. Among the sample of known ~7-10 Myr-old star/disk systems, TWA 34, which lies just ~50 pc from Earth, is the lowest mass star thus far identified as harboring cold molecular gas in an orbiting disk.
  • We present results from a spectroscopic Spitzer and Herschel mid-to-far-infrared study of the circumbinary disk orbiting the evolved (age ~12-23 Myr) close binary T Tauri system V4046 Sgr. Spitzer IRS spectra show emission lines of [Ne II], H_2 S(1), CO_2 and HCN, while Herschel PACS and SPIRE spectra reveal emission from [O I], OH, and tentative detections of H_2O and high-J transitions of CO. We measure [Ne III]/[Ne II] < 0.13, which is comparable to other X-ray/EUV luminous T Tauri stars that lack jets. We use the H_2 S(1) line luminosity to estimate the gas mass in the relatively warm surface layers of the inner disk. The presence of [O I] emission suggests that CO, H_2O, and/or OH is being photodissociated, and the lack of [C I] emission suggests any excess C may be locked up in HCN, CN and other organic molecules. Modeling of silicate dust grain emission features in the mid-infrared indicates that the inner disk is composed mainly of large (r~5 um) amorphous pyroxene and olivine grains (~86% by mass) with a relatively large proportion of crystalline silicates. These results are consistent with other lines of evidence indicating that planet building is ongoing in regions of the disk within ~30 AU of the central, close binary.
  • We have used the Submillimeter Array to image, at ~1.5" resolution, C2H (3-2) emission from the circumstellar disk orbiting the nearby (D = 54 pc), ~8 Myr-old, ~0.8 Msun classical T Tauri star TW Hya. The SMA imaging reveals that the C2H emission exhibits a ring-like morphology. Based on a model in which the C2H column density follows a truncated radial power-law distribution, we find that the inner edge of the ring lies at ~45 AU, and that the ring extends to at least ~120 AU. Comparison with previous (single-dish) observations of C2H (4-3) emission indicates that the C2H molecules are subthermally excited and, hence, that the emission arises from the relatively warm, tenuous upper atmosphere of the disk. We propose that the C2H emission most likely traces particularly efficient photo-destruction of small grains and/or photodesorption and photodissociation of hydrocarbons derived from grain ice mantles in the surface layers of the outer disk. The presence of a C2H ring in the TW Hya disk hence likely serves as a marker of dust grain processing and radial and vertical grain size segregation within the disk.
  • The outer (>30 AU) regions of the dusty circumstellar disk orbiting the ~2-5 Myr-old, actively accreting solar analog LkCa 15 are known to be chemically rich, and the inner disk may host a young protoplanet within its central cavity. To obtain a complete census of the brightest molecular line emission emanating from the LkCa 15 disk over the 210-270 GHz (1.4 - 1.1 mm) range, we have conducted an unbiased radio spectroscopic survey with the Institute de Radioastronomie Millimetrique (IRAM) 30 meter telescope. The survey demonstrates that, in this spectral region, the most readily detectable lines are those of CO and its isotopologues 13CO and C18O, as well as HCO+, HCN, CN, C2H, CS, and H2CO. All of these species had been previously detected in the LkCa 15 disk; however, the present survey includes the first complete coverage of the CN (2-1) and C2H (3-2) hyperfine complexes. Modeling of these emission complexes indicates that the CN and C2H either reside in the coldest regions of the disk or are subthermally excited, and that their abundances are enhanced relative to molecular clouds and young stellar object environments. These results highlight the value of unbiased single-dish line surveys in guiding future high resolution interferometric imaging of disks.
  • We report the presence of scattered light from dust grains located in the giant planet formation region of the circumbinary disk orbiting the ~20-Myr-old close (~0.045 AU separation) binary system V4046 Sgr AB based on observations with the new Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) instrument. These GPI images probe to within ~7 AU of the central binary with linear spatial resolution of ~3 AU, and are thereby capable of revealing dust disk structure within a region corresponding to the giant planets in our solar system. The GPI imaging reveals a relatively narrow (FWHM ~10 AU) ring of polarized near-infrared flux whose brightness peaks at ~14 AU. This ~14 AU radius ring is surrounded by a fainter outer halo of scattered light extending to ~45 AU, which coincides with previously detected mm-wave thermal dust emission. The presence of small grains that efficiently scatter starlight well inside the mm-wavelength disk cavity supports current models of planet formation that suggest planet-disk interactions can generate pressure traps that impose strong radial variations in the particle size distribution throughout the disk.
  • Determinations of the fundamental properties (e.g., masses and ages) of late-type, pre-main sequence (pre-MS) stars are complicated by the potential for significant discrepancies between the spectral types of such stars as ascertained via optical vs. near-infrared observations. To address this problem, we have obtained near-IR spectroscopy of the nearby, close binary T Tauri system V4046 Sgr AB with the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) SPEX spectrometer. The V4046 Sgr close binary (and circumbinary disk) system provides an important test case for spectral type determination thanks to the stringent observational constraints on its component stellar masses (i.e., ~0.9 Msun each) as well as on its age (12-21 Myr) and distance (73 pc). Analysis of the IRTF data indicates that the composite near-IR spectral type for V4046 Sgr AB lies in the range M0-M1, i.e., significantly later than the K5+K7 composite type previously determined from optical spectroscopy. However, the K5+K7 composite type is in better agreement with theoretical pre-MS evolutionary tracks, given the well-determined properties of V4046 Sgr AB. These results serve as a cautionary tale for studies that rely on near-infrared spectroscopy as a primary means to infer the ages and masses of pre-MS stars.
  • We have conducted the first comprehensive mm-wave molecular emission line surveys of the evolved circumstellar disks orbiting the nearby T Tauri stars TW Hya and V4046 Sgr AB. Both disks are known to retain significant residual gaseous components, despite the advanced ages of their host stars. Our unbiased broad-band radio spectral surveys of the TW Hya and V4046 Sgr disks were performed with the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) 12 meter telescope and are intended to yield a complete census of bright molecular emission lines in the range 275-357 GHz (1.1-0.85 mm). We find that lines of 12CO, 13CO, HCN, CN, and C2H, all of which lie in the higher-frequency range, constitute the strongest molecular emission from both disks in the spectral region surveyed. The molecule C2H is detected here for the first time in both disks, as is CS in the TW Hya disk. The survey results also include the first measurements of the full suite of hyperfine transitions of CN N=3-2 and C2H N=4-3 in both disks. Modeling of these CN and C2H hyperfine complexes in the spectrum of TW Hya indicates that the emission from both species is optically thick and may originate from very cold disk regions. It furthermore appears that the fractional abundances of CN and C2H are significantly enhanced in these evolved protoplanetary disks relative to the fractional abundances of the same molecules in the environments of deeply embedded protostars.
  • X-ray emission is characteristic of young stellar objects (YSOs) and is known to be highly variable. We investigate, via an infrared and multi-epoch X-ray study of the L1630 dark cloud, whether and how X-ray variability in young stellar objects is related to protostellar evolutionary state. We have analyzed 11 Chandra X-ray Observatory observations, obtained over the course of four years and totaling ~240 ks exposure time, targeting the eruptive Class I YSO V1647 Ori in L1630. We used 2MASS and Spitzer data to identify and classify IR counterparts to L1630 X-ray sources and identified a total of 52 X-ray emitting YSOs with IR counterparts, including 4 Class I sources and 1 Class 0/I source. We have detected cool (< 3 MK) plasma, possibly indicative of accretion shocks, in three classical T Tauri stars. A subsample of 27 X-ray-emitting YSOs were covered by 9 of the 11 Chandra observations targeting V1647 Ori and vicinity. For these 27 YSOs, we have constructed X-ray light curves spanning approximately four years. These light curves highlight the variable nature of pre-main sequence X-ray emitting young stars; many of the L1630 YSOs vary by orders of magnitude in count rate between observations. We discuss possible scenarios to explain apparent trends between various X-ray spectral properties, X-ray variance and YSO classification.
  • In the last twenty years, the topic of episodic accretion has gained significant interest in the star formation community. It is now viewed as a common, though still poorly understood, phenomenon in low-mass star formation. The FU Orionis objects (FUors) are long-studied examples of this phenomenon. FUors are believed to undergo accretion outbursts during which the accretion rate rapidly increases from typically $10^{-7}$ to a few $10^{-4}$ $M_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$, and remains elevated over several decades or more. EXors, a loosely defined class of pre-main sequence stars, exhibit shorter and repetitive outbursts, associated with lower accretion rates. The relationship between the two classes, and their connection to the standard pre-main sequence evolutionary sequence, is an open question: do they represent two distinct classes, are they triggered by the same physical mechanism, and do they occur in the same evolutionary phases? Over the past couple of decades, many theoretical and numerical models have been developed to explain the origin of FUor and EXor outbursts. In parallel, such accretion bursts have been detected at an increasing rate, and as observing techniques improve each individual outburst is studied in increasing detail. We summarize key observations of pre-main sequence star outbursts, and review the latest thinking on outburst triggering mechanisms, the propagation of outbursts from star/disk to disk/jet systems, the relation between classical EXors and FUors, and newly discovered outbursting sources -- all of which shed new light on episodic accretion. We finally highlight some of the most promising directions for this field in the near- and long-term.
  • We describe a method that exploits data from the GALEX ultraviolet and WISE and 2MASS infrared source catalogs, combined with proper motions and empirical pre-main sequence isochrones, to identify candidate nearby, young, low-mass stars. Applying our method across the full GALEX- covered sky, we identify 2031 mostly M-type stars that, for an assumed age of 10 (100) Myr, all lie within ~150 (~90) pc of Earth. The distribution of M spectral subclasses among these ~2000 candidate young stars peaks sharply in the range M3-M4; these subtypes constitute 50% of the sample, consistent with studies of the M star population in the immediate solar neighborhood. We focus on a subset of 58 of these candidate young M stars in the vicinity of the Tucana-Horologium Association. Only 20 of these 58 candidates were detected in the ROSAT All-Sky X-ray Survey -- reflecting the greater sensitivity of GALEX for purposes of identifying active nearby, young stars, particularly for stars of type M4 and later. Based on statistical analysis of the kinematics and/or spectroscopic followup of these 58 M stars, we find that 50% (29 stars) indeed have properties consistent with Tuc-Hor membership, while 12 are potential new members of the Columba Association, and two may be AB Dor moving group members. Hence, ~75% of our initial subsample of 58 candidates are likely members of young (age ~10-40 Myr) stellar moving groups within 100 pc, verifying that the stellar color- and kinematics-based selection algorithms described here can be used to efficiently isolate nearby, young, low-mass objects from among the field star population. Future studies will focus on characterizing additional subsamples selected from among this list of candidate nearby, young M stars.
  • EX Lupi is the prototype for a class of young, pre-main sequence stars which are observed to undergo irregular, presumably accretion-generated, optical outbursts that result in a several magnitude rise of the optical flux. EX Lupi was observed to optically erupt in 2008 January, triggering Chandra ACIS ToO observations shortly thereafter. We find very strong evidence that most of the X-ray emission in the first few months after the optical outburst is generated by accretion of circumstellar material onto the stellar photosphere. Specifically, we find a strong correlation between the decreasing optical and X-ray fluxes following the peak of the outburst in the optical, which suggests that these observed declines in both the optical and X-ray fluxes are the result of declining accretion rate. In addition, in our models of the X-ray spectrum, we find strong evidence for a ~0.4 keV plasma component, as expected for accretion shocks on low-mass, pre-main sequence stars. From 2008 March through October, this cool plasma component appears to fade as EX Lupi returns to its quiescent level in the optical, consistent with a decrease in the overall emission measure of accretion shock-generated plasma. The overall small increase of the X-ray flux during the optical outburst of EX Lupi is similar to what was observed in previous X-ray observations of the 2005 optical outburst of the EX Lupi-type star V1118 Ori but contrasts with the large increase of the X-ray flux from the erupting young star V1647 Ori during its 2003 and 2008 optical outbursts.
  • The majority of Proto-planetary nebulae (PPN) are observed to have bipolar morphologies. The majority of mature PN are observed to have elliptical shapes. In this paper we address the evolution of PPN/PN morphologies attempting to understand if a transition from strongly bipolar to elliptical shape can be driven by changes in the parameters of the mass loss process. To this end we present 2.5D hydrodynamical simulations of mass loss at the end stages of stellar evolution for intermediate mass stars. We track changes in wind velocity, mass loss rate and mass loss geometry. In particular we focus on the transition from mass loss dominated by a short duration jet flow (driven during the PPN phase) to mass loss driven by a spherical fast wind (produced by the central star of the PN). We address how such changes in outflow characteristics can change the nebula from a bipolar to an elliptical morphology. Our results show that including a period of jet formation in the temporal sequence of PPN to PN produces realistic nebular synthetic emission geometries. More importantly such a sequence provides insight, in principle, into the apparent difference in morphology statistics characterizing PPN and PN systems. In particular we find that while jet driven PPN can be expected to be dominated by bipolar morphologies, systems that begin with a jet but are followed by a spherical fast wind will evolve into elliptical nebulae. Furthermore, we find that spherical nebulae are highly unlikely to ever derive from either bipolar PPN or elliptical PN.
  • We report a periodicity of ~1 day in the highly elevated X-ray emission from the protostar V1647 Ori during its two recent multiple-year outbursts of mass accretion. This periodicity is indicative of protostellar rotation at near-breakup speed. Modeling of the phased X-ray light curve indicates the high-temperature (~50 MK), X-ray-emitting plasma, which is most likely heated by accretion-induced magnetic reconnection, resides in dense (>~5e10 cm-3), pancake-shaped magnetic footprints where the accretion stream feeds the newborn star. The sustained X-ray periodicity of V1647 Ori demonstrates that such protostellar magnetospheric accretion configurations can be stable over timescales of years.
  • The Suzaku X-ray satellite observed the young stellar object V1647 Ori on 2008 October 8 during the new mass accretion outburst reported in August 2008. During the 87 ksec observation with a net exposure of 40 ks, V1647 Ori showed a high level of X-ray emission with a gradual decrease in flux by a factor of 5 and then displayed an abrupt flux increase by an order of magnitude. Such enhanced X-ray variability was also seen in XMM-Newton observations in 2004 and 2005 during the 2003-2005 outburst, but has rarely been observed for other young stellar objects. The spectrum clearly displays emission from Helium-like iron, which is a signature of hot plasma (kT ~5 keV). It also shows a fluorescent iron Kalpha line with a remarkably large equivalent width of ~600 eV. Such a large equivalent width suggests that a part of the incident X-ray emission that irradiates the circumstellar material and/or the stellar surface is hidden from our line of sight. XMM-Newton spectra during the 2003-2005 outburst did not show a strong fluorescent iron Kalpha line, so that the structure of the circumstellar gas very close to the stellar core that absorbs and re-emits X-ray emission from the central object may have changed in between 2005 and 2008. This phenomenon may be related to changes in the infrared morphology of McNeil's nebula between 2004 and 2008.
  • The early-K star T Cha, a member of the relatively nearby (D ~ 100 pc) epsilon Cha Association, is a relatively "old" (age ~7 Myr) T Tauri star that is still sporadically accreting from an orbiting disk whose inner regions are evidently now being cleared by a close, substellar companion. We report the identification, via analysis of proper motions, serendipitous X-ray imaging spectroscopy, and followup optical spectroscopy, of a new member of the epsilon Cha Association that is very likely a low-mass companion to T Cha at a projected separation of ~38 kAU. The combined X-ray and optical spectroscopy data indicate that the companion, T Cha B (= 2M1155-79), is a weak-lined T Tauri star (wTTS) of spectral type M3 and age ~<10 Myr. The serendipitous X-ray (XMM-Newton) observation of T Cha B, which targeted T Cha, also yields serendipitous detections of two background wTTS in the Chamaeleon cloud complex, including one newly discovered, low-mass member of the Cha cloud pre-MS population. T Cha becomes the third prominent example of a nearby, "old" yet still actively accreting, K-type pre-MS star/disk system (the others being TW Hya and V4046 Sgr) to feature a low-mass companion at very large (12-40 kAU) separation, suggesting that such wide-separation companions may affect the conditions and timescales for planet formation around solar-mass stars.
  • The pre-main sequence star V1647 Ori has recently undergone two optical/near-infrared (OIR) outbursts that are associated with dramatic enhancements in the stellar accretion rate. Our intensive X-ray monitoring of this object affords the opportunity to investigate whether and how the intense X-ray emission is related to pre-MS accretion activity. Our analysis of all fourteen Chandra X-ray Observatory observations of V1647 Ori demonstrate that variations in the X-ray luminosity of V1647 Ori are correlated with similar changes in the OIR brightness of this source during both (2003-2005 and 2008) eruptions, strongly supporting the hypothesis that accretion is the primary generation mechanism for the X-ray outbursts. Furthermore, the Chandra monitoring demonstrates that the X-ray spectral properties of the second eruption were strikingly similar to those of the 2003 eruption. We find that X-ray spectra obtained immediately following the second outburst - during which V1647 Ori exhibited high X-ray luminosities, high hardness ratios, and strong X-ray variability - are well modeled as a heavily absorbed (N_H ~ 4x10^22 cm^-2), single-component plasma with characteristic temperatures (kT_X ~ 2-6 keV) that are consistently too high to be generated via accretion shocks but are in the range expected for plasma heated by magnetic reconnection events. We also find that the X-ray absorbing column has not changed significantly throughout the observing campaign. Since the OIR and X-ray changes are correlated, we hypothesize that these reconnection events either occur in the accretion stream connecting the circumstellar disk to the star or in accretion-enhanced protostellar coronal activity.