• We report the discovery of three moderately high-mass transiting hot Jupiters from the HATSouth survey: HATS-22b, HATS-23b and HATS-24b. These planets add to the numbers of known planets in the ~2MJ regime. HATS-22b is a 2.74+/-0.11 MJ mass and 0.953+0.048/-0.029 RJ radius planet orbiting a V = 13.455 +/- 0.040 sub-silar mass (M_star = 0.759+/-0.019 M_sun; R_star = 0.759+/-0.019 R_sun) K-dwarf host star on an eccentric (e = 0.079 +/- 0.026) orbit. This planet's high planet-to-stellar mass ratio is further evidence that migration mechanisms for hot Jupiters may rely on exciting orbital eccentricities that bring planets closer to their parent stars followed by tidal circularisation. HATS-23b is a 1.478 +/- 0.080 MJ mass and 1.69 +/- 0.24 RJ radius planet on a grazing orbit around a V = 13.901 +/- 0.010 G-dwarf with properties very similar to those of the Sun (M_star = 1.115 +/- 0.054 M_sun; R_star = 1.145 +/- 0.070 R_sun). HATS-24b orbits a moderately bright V = 12.830 +/- 0.010 F-dwarf star (M_star = 1.218 +/- 0.036 M_sun; R_star = 1.194+0.066/-0.041 R_sun). This planet has a mass of 2.39 +0.21/-0.12 MJ and an inflated radius of 1.516 +0.085/-0.065 RJ.
  • We describe the Zonal Atmospheric Stellar Parameters Estimator (ZASPE), a new algorithm, and its associated code, for determining precise stellar atmospheric parameters and their uncertainties from high resolution echelle spectra of FGK-type stars. ZASPE estimates stellar atmospheric parameters by comparing the observed spectrum against a grid of synthetic spectra only in the most sensitive spectral zones to changes in the atmospheric parameters. Realistic uncertainties in the parameters are computed from the data itself, by taking into account the systematic mismatches between the observed spectrum and the best-fit synthetic one. The covariances between the parameters are also estimated in the process. ZASPE can in principle use any pre-calculated grid of synthetic spectra. We tested the performance of two existing libraries (Coehelo et al. 2005, Husser et al. 2013) and we concluded that neither is suitable for computing precise atmospheric parameters. We describe a process to synthesise a new library of synthetic spectra that was found to generate consistent results when compared with parameters obtained with different methods (interferometry, asteroseismology, equivalent widths).
  • We present a survey of 41 Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) for exomoons using Bayesian photodynamics, more than tripling the number of KOIs surveyed with this technique. We find no compelling evidence for exomoons although thirteen KOIs yield spurious detections driven by instrumental artifacts, stellar activity and/or perturbations from unseen bodies. Regarding the latter, we find seven KOIs exhibiting >5 sigma evidence of transit timing variations, including the 'mega-Earth' Kepler-10c, likely indicating an additional planet in that system. We exploit the moderately large sample of 57 unique KOIs surveyed to date to infer several useful statistics. For example, although there is a diverse range in sensitivities, we find that we are sensitive to Pluto-Charon mass-ratio systems for ~40% of KOIs studied and Earth-Moon mass-ratios for 1 in 8 cases. In terms of absolute mass, our limits probe down to 1.7 Ganymede masses, with a sensitivity to Earth-mass moons for 1 in 3 cases studied and to the smallest moons capable of sustaining an Earth-like atmosphere (0.3 Earth masses) for 1 in 4. Despite the lack of positive detections to date, we caution against drawing conclusions yet, since our most interesting objects remain under analysis. Finally, we point out that had we searched for the photometric transit signals of exomoons alone, rather than using photodynamics, we estimate that 1 in 4 KOIs would have erroneously been concluded to harbor exomoons due to residual time correlated noise in the Kepler data, posing a serious problem for alternative methods.
  • We provide a revised assessment of the number of exoplanets that should be discovered by Gaia astrometry, extending previous studies to a broader range of spectral types, distances, and magnitudes. Our assessment is based on a large representative sample of host stars from the TRILEGAL Galaxy population synthesis model, recent estimates of the exoplanet frequency distributions as a function of stellar type, and detailed simulation of the Gaia observations using the updated instrument performance and scanning law. We use two approaches to estimate detectable planetary systems: one based on the S/N of the astrometric signature per field crossing, easily reproducible and allowing comparisons with previous estimates, and a new and more robust metric based on orbit fitting to the simulated satellite data. With some plausible assumptions on planet occurrences, we find that some 21,000 (+/-6000) high-mass (1-15M_J) long-period planets should be discovered out to distances of ~500pc for the nominal 5-yr mission (including at least 1000-1500 around M dwarfs out to 100pc), rising to some 70,000 (+/-20,000) for a 10-yr mission. We indicate some of the expected features of this exoplanet population, amongst them ~25-50 intermediate-period (P~2-3yr) transiting systems.
  • With their smaller radii and high cosmic abundance, transiting planets around cool stars hold a unique appeal. As part of our on-going project to measure the occurrence rate of extrasolar moons, we here present results from a survey focussing on eight Kepler planetary candidates associated with M-dwarfs. Using photodynamical modeling and Bayesian multimodal nested sampling, we find no compelling evidence for an exomoon in these eight systems. Upper limits on the presence of such bodies probe down to $\sim0.4M_{\oplus}$ in the best case. For KOI-314, we are able to confirm the planetary nature of two out of the three known transiting candidates using transit timing variations. Of particular interest is KOI-314c, which is found to have a mass of $1.0_{-0.3}^{+0.4}M_{\oplus}$, making it the lowest mass transiting planet discovered to date. With a radius of $1.61_{-0.15}^{+0.16}R_{\oplus}$, this Earth-mass world is likely enveloped by a significant gaseous envelope comprising $\geq17_{-13}^{+12}$% of the planet by radius. We find evidence to support the planetary nature of KOI-784 too via transit timing, but we advocate further observations to verify the signals. In both systems, we infer that the inner planet has a higher density than the outer world, which may be indicative of photo-evaporation. These results highlight both the ability of Kepler to search for sub-Earth mass moons and the exciting ancillary science which often results from such efforts.
  • Kepler-22b is the first transiting planet to have been detected in the habitable-zone of its host star. At 2.4 Earth radii, Kepler-22b is too large to be considered an Earth-analog, but should the planet host a moon large enough to maintain an atmosphere, then the Kepler-22 system may yet possess a telluric world. Aside from being within the habitable-zone, the target is attractive due to the availability of previously measured precise radial velocities and low intrinsic photometric noise, which has also enabled asteroseismology studies of the star. For these reasons, Kepler-22b was selected as a target-of-opportunity by the 'Hunt for Exomoons with Kepler' (HEK) project. In this work, we conduct a photodynamical search for an exomoon around Kepler-22b leveraging the transits, radial velocities and asteroseismology plus several new tools developed by the HEK project to improve exomoon searches. We find no evidence for an exomoon around the planet and exclude moons of mass >0.5 Earth masses to 95% confidence. By signal injection and blind retrieval, we demonstrate that an Earth-like moon is easily detected for this planet even when the time-correlated noise of the data set is taken into account. We provide updated parameters for the planet Kepler-22b including a revised mass of <53 Earth masses to 95% confidence and an eccentricity of 0.13(-0.13)(+0.36) by exploiting Single-body Asterodensity Profiling (SAP). Finally, we show that Kepler-22b has a >95% probability of being within the empirical habitable-zone but a <5% probability of being within the conservative habitable-zone.
  • The Transit Timing Variations (TTVs) can be used as a diagnostic of gravitational interactions between planets in a multi-planet system. Many Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) exhibit significant TTVs, but KOI-142.01 stands out among them with an unrivaled, 12-hour TTV amplitude. Here we report a thorough analysis of KOI-142.01's transits. We discover periodic Transit Duration Variations (TDVs) of KOI-142.01 that are nearly in phase with the observed TTVs. We show that KOI-142.01's TTVs and TDVs uniquely detect a non-transiting companion with a mass 0.7 that of Jupiter (KOI-142c). KOI-142.01's mass inferred from the transit variations is consistent with the measured transit depth, suggesting a Neptune class planet (KOI-142b). The orbital period ratio P_c/P_b=2.03 indicates that the two planets are just wide of the 2:1 resonance. The present dynamics of this system, characterized here in detail, can be used to test various formation theories that have been proposed to explain the near-resonant pairs of exoplanets.
  • From the list of 2321 transiting planet candidates announced by the Kepler Mission, we select seven targets with favorable properties for the capacity to dynamically maintain an exomoon and present a detectable signal. These seven candidates were identified through our automatic target selection (TSA) algorithm and target selection prioritization (TSP) filtering, whereby we excluded systems exhibiting significant time-correlated noise and focussed on those with a single transiting planet candidate of radius less than 6 Earth radii. We find no compelling evidence for an exomoon around any of the seven KOIs but constrain the satellite-to-planet mass ratios for each. For four of the seven KOIs, we estimate a 95% upper quantile of M_S/M_P<0.04, which given the radii of the candidates, likely probes down to sub-Earth masses. We also derive precise transit times and durations for each candidate and find no evidence for dynamical variations in any of the KOIs. With just a few systems analyzed thus far in the in-going HEK project, projections on eta-moon would be premature, but a high frequency of large moons around Super-Earths/Mini-Neptunes would appear to be incommensurable with our results so far.
  • The Kepler Mission is monitoring the brightness of ~150,000 stars searching for evidence of planetary transits. As part of the "Hunt for Exomoons with Kepler" (HEK) project, we report a planetary system with two confirmed planets and one candidate planet discovered using the publicly available data for KOI-872. Planet b transits the host star with a period P_b=33.6d and exhibits large transit timing variations indicative of a perturber. Dynamical modeling uniquely detects an outer nontransiting planet c near the 5:3 resonance (P_c=57.0d) of mass 0.37 times that of Jupiter. Transits of a third planetary candidate are also found: a 1.7-Earth radius super-Earth with a 6.8d period. Our analysis indicates a system with nearly coplanar and circular orbits, reminiscent of the orderly arrangement within the solar system.
  • We present multi-band optical photometry of 94 spectroscopically-confirmed Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) in the redshift range 0.0055 to 0.073, obtained between 2006 and 2011. There are a total of 5522 light curve points. We show that our natural system SN photometry has a precision of roughly 0.03 mag or better in BVr'i', 0.06 mag in u', and 0.07 mag in U for points brighter than 17.5 mag and estimate that it has a systematic uncertainty of 0.014, 0.010, 0.012, 0.014, 0.046, and 0.073 mag in BVr'i'u'U, respectively. Comparisons of our standard system photometry with published SN Ia light curves and comparison stars reveal mean agreement across samples in the range of ~0.00-0.03 mag. We discuss the recent measurements of our telescope-plus-detector throughput by direct monochromatic illumination by Cramer et al (in prep.). This technique measures the whole optical path through the telescope, auxiliary optics, filters, and detector under the same conditions used to make SN measurements. Extremely well-characterized natural-system passbands (both in wavelength and over time) are crucial for the next generation of SN Ia photometry to reach the 0.01 mag accuracy level. The current sample of low-z SN Ia is now sufficiently large to remove most of the statistical sampling error from the dark energy error budget. But pursuing the dark-energy systematic errors by determining highly-accurate detector passbands, combining optical and near-infrared (NIR) photometry and spectra, using the nearby sample to illuminate the population properties of SN Ia, and measuring the local departures from the Hubble flow will benefit from larger, carefully measured nearby samples.
  • We report the discovery of HAT-P-31b, a transiting exoplanet orbiting the V=11.660 dwarf star GSC 2099-00908. HAT-P-31b is the first HAT planet discovered without any follow-up photometry, demonstrating the feasibility of a new mode of operation for the HATNet project. The 2.17 Mj, 1.1Rj planet has a period P = 5.0054 days and maintains an unusually high eccentricity of e = 0.2450+/-0.0045, determined through Keck, FIES and Subaru high precision radial velocities. Detailed modeling of the radial velocities indicates an additional quadratic residual trend in the data detected to very high confidence. We interpret this trend as a long-period outer companion, HAT-P-31c, of minimum mass 3.4Mj and period >2.8 years. Since current RVs span less than half an orbital period, we are unable to determine the properties of HAT-P-31c to high confidence. However, dynamical simulations of two possible configurations show that orbital stability is to be expected. Further, if HAT-P-31c has non-zero eccentricity, our simulations show that the eccentricity of HAT-P-31b is actively driven by the presence of c, making HAT-P-31 a potentially intriguing dynamical laboratory.
  • We report the discovery of HAT-P-27b, an exoplanet transiting the moderately bright G8 dwarf star GSC 0333-00351 (V=12.214). The orbital period is 3.039586 +/- 0.000012 d, the reference epoch of transit is 2455186.01879 +/- 0.00054 (BJD), and the transit duration is 0.0705 +/- 0.0019 d. The host star with its effective temperature 5300 +/- 90 K is somewhat cooler than the Sun, and is more metal-rich with a metallicity of +0.29 +/- 0.10. Its mass is 0.94 +/- 0.04 Msun and radius is 0.90 +/- 0.04 Rsun. For the planetary companion we determine a mass of 0.660 +/- 0.033 MJ and radius of 1.038 +0.077 -0.058 RJ. For the 30 known transiting exoplanets between 0.3 MJ and 0.8 MJ, a negative correlation between host star metallicity and planetary radius, and an additional dependence of planetary radius on equilibrium temperature are confirmed at a high level of statistical significance.
  • We present new radial-velocity measurements of HAT-P-13, a star with two previously known companions: a transiting giant planet "b" with an orbital period of 3 days, and a more massive object "c" on a 1.2 yr, highly eccentric orbit. For this system, dynamical considerations would lead to constraints on planet b's interior structure, if it could be shown that the orbits are coplanar and apsidally locked. By modeling the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, we show that planet b's orbital angular momentum vector and the stellar spin vector are well-aligned on the sky (lambda = -0.9 +/- 8.5 deg), suggesting that the planetary orbits are also well-aligned. The refined orbital solution favors a slightly eccentric orbit for planet b (e = 0.0142_{-0.0044}^{+0.0052}), although it is not clear whether it is apsidally locked with c's orbit (\Delta\omega = 48_{-38}^{+25} deg). We find a long-term trend in the star's radial velocity and interpret it as evidence for an additional body "d", which may be another planet or a low-mass star. The next inferior conjunction of c, when a transit may happen, is expected on JD 2,455,315.2 +/- 1.9 (centered on UT 17h 2010 April 28).
  • We present HST/NICMOS imaging of the H_2 2.12 \mu m emission in 5 fields in the Helix Nebula ranging in radial distance from 250-450" from the central star. The images reveal arcuate structures with their apexes pointing towards the central star. Comparison of these images with comparable resolution ground based images reveals that the molecular gas is more highly clumped than the ionized gas line tracers. From our images, we determine an average number density of knots in the molecular gas ranging from 162 knots/arcmin^2 in the denser regions to 18 knots/arcmin^2 in the lower density outer regions. Using this new number density, we estimate that the total number of knots in the Helix to be ~23,000 which is a factor of 6.5 larger than previous estimates. The total neutral gas mass in the Helix is 0.35 M_\odot assuming a mass of \~1.5x10^{-5} M_\odot for the individual knots. The H_2 intensity, 5-9x10^{-5} erg s^{-1} cm^{-2} sr^{-1}, remains relatively constant with projected distance from the central star suggesting a heating mechanism for the molecular gas that is distributed almost uniformly in the knots throughout the nebula. The temperature and H_2 2.12 \mu m intensity of the knots can be approximately explained by photodissociation regions (PDRs) in the individual knots; however, theoretical PDR models of PN under-predict the intensities of some knots by a factor of 10.