• We report spectroscopic results from our 40-orbit $Hubble~Space~Telescope$ slitless grism spectroscopy program observing the 20 densest CARLA candidate galaxy clusters at $1.4 < z < 2.8$. These candidate rich structures, among the richest and most distant known, were identified on the basis of $[3.6]-[4.5]$ color from a $408~$hr multi-cycle $Spitzer$ program targeting $420$ distant radio-loud AGN. We report the spectroscopic confirmation of $16$ distant structures at $1.4 < z < 2.8$ associated with the targeted powerful high-redshift radio-loud AGN. We also report the serendipitous discovery and spectroscopic confirmation of seven additional structures at $0.87 < z < 2.12$ not associated with the targeted radio-loud AGN. We find that $10^{10} - 10^{11}\,M_{\odot}$ member galaxies of our confirmed CARLA structures form significantly fewer stars than their field counterparts at all redshifts within $1.4\leq z\leq 2$. We also observe higher star-forming activity in the structure cores up to $z = 2$, finding similar trends as cluster surveys at slightly lower redshifts ($1.0 < z < 1.5$). By design, our efficient strategy of obtaining just two grism orbits per field only obtains spectroscopic confirmation of emission-line galaxies. Deeper spectroscopy will be required to study the population of evolved, massive galaxies in these (forming) clusters. Lacking multi-band coverage of the fields, we adopt a very conservative approach of calling all confirmations "structures", although we note that a number of features are consistent with some of them being bona fide galaxy clusters. Together, this survey represents a unique and large homogenous sample of spectroscopically confirmed structures at high redshifts, potentially more than doubling the census of confirmed, massive clusters at $z > 1.4$.
  • We present a MUSE and KMOS dynamical study 405 star-forming galaxies at redshift z=0.28-1.65 (median redshift z=0.84). Our sample are representative of star-forming, main-sequence galaxies, with star-formation rates of SFR=0.1-30Mo/yr and stellar masses M=10^8-10^11Mo. For 49+/-4% of our sample, the dynamics suggest rotational support, 24+/-3% are unresolved systems and 5+/-2% appear to be early-stage major mergers with components on 8-30kpc scales. The remaining 22+/-5% appear to be dynamically complex, irregular (or face-on systems). For galaxies whose dynamics suggest rotational support, we derive inclination corrected rotational velocities and show these systems lie on a similar scaling between stellar mass and specific angular momentum as local spirals with j*=J/M*\propto M^(2/3) but with a redshift evolution that scales as j*\propto M^{2/3}(1+z)^(-1). We identify a correlation between specific angular momentum and disk stability such that galaxies with the highest specific angular momentum, log(j*/M^(2/3))>2.5, are the most stable, with Toomre Q=1.10+/-0.18, compared to Q=0.53+/-0.22 for galaxies with log(j*/M^(2/3))<2.5. At a fixed mass, the HST morphologies of galaxies with the highest specific angular momentum resemble spiral galaxies, whilst those with low specific angular momentum are morphologically complex and dominated by several bright star-forming regions. This suggests that angular momentum plays a major role in defining the stability of gas disks: at z~1, massive galaxies that have disks with low specific angular momentum, appear to be globally unstable, clumpy and turbulent systems. In contrast, galaxies with high specific angular have evolved in to stable disks with spiral structures.
  • Using HST slitless grism data, we report the spectroscopic confirmation of two distant structures at $z \sim 2$ associated with powerful high-redshift radio-loud AGN. These rich structures, likely (forming) clusters, are among the most distant currently known and were identified on the basis of Spitzer/IRAC [3.6] - [4.5] color. We spectroscopically confirm 9 members in the field of MRC 2036-254, comprising eight star-forming galaxies and the targeted radio galaxy. The median redshift is $z = 2.000$. We spectroscopically confirm 10 members in the field of B3 0756+406, comprising eight star-forming galaxies and two AGN, including the targeted radio-loud quasar. The median redshift is $z = 1.986$. All confirmed members are within 500 kpc (1 arcmin) of the targeted AGN. We derive median (mean) star-formation rates of $\sim 35~M_{\odot}\rm ~ yr^{-1}$ ($\sim 50~M_{\odot}\rm ~ yr^{-1}$) for the confirmed star-forming members of both structures based on their [OIII]$\lambda5007$ luminosities, and estimate average galaxy stellar masses $\lesssim 1 \times 10^{11} ~M_{\odot}$ based on mid-infrared fluxes and SED modeling. Most of our confirmed members are located above the star-forming main-sequence towards starburst galaxies, consistent with clusters at these early epochs being the sites of significant levels of star formation. The structure around MRC 2036-254 shows an overdensity of IRAC-selected candidate galaxy cluster members consistent with being quiescent galaxies, while the structure around B3 0756+406 shows field values, albeit with many lower limits to colors that could allow an overdensity of faint red quiescent galaxies. The structure around MRC 2036-254 shows a red sequence of passive galaxy candidates.
  • High-redshift radio galaxies present signs of both star formation and AGN activity, making them ideal candidates to investigate the connection and coevolution of AGN and star formation in the progenitors of present-day massive galaxies. We make use of a sample of 11 powerful radio galaxies spanning 1<z<4 which have complete coverage of their spectral energy distribution (SED) from UV to FIR wavelengths. Using Herschel data, we disentangle the relative contribution of the AGN and star formation by combining the galaxyevolutioncodePEGASE.3 with an AGN torus model. We find that three components are necessary to reproduce the observed SEDs: an evolved and massive stellar component, a submm bright young starburst, and an AGN torus. We find that powerful radio galaxies form at very high-redshift, but experience episodic and important growth at 1<z<4 as the mass of the associated starburst varies from 5 to 50% of the total mass of the system. The properties of star formation differ from source to source, indicating no general trend of the star formation properties in the most infrared luminous high-redshift radio galaxies and no correlation with the AGN bolometric luminosity. Moreover, we find that AGN scattered light have a very limited impact on broad-band SED fitting on our sample. Finally, our analysis also suggests a wide range in origins for the observed star formation,which we partially constrain for some sources.
  • We present a pilot study of the z=2.923 radio galaxy MRC0943-242, where we for the first time combine information from ALMA and MUSE data cubes. Even with modest integration times, we disentangle an AGN and a starburst dominated set of components. These data reveal a highly complex morphology, as the AGN, starburst, and molecular gas components show up as widely separated sources in dust continuum, optical continuum and CO line emission observations. CO(1-0) and CO(8-7) line emission suggest that there is a molecular gas reservoir offset from both the dust and the optical continuum that is located ~90kpc from the AGN. The UV line emission has a complex structure in emission and absorption. The line emission is mostly due to i) a large scale ionisation cone energised by the AGN, ii) a Ly-alpha emitting bridge of gas between the radio galaxy and a heavily star-forming set of components. Strangely, the ionisation cone has no Ly-alpha emission. We find this is due to an optically thick layer of neutral gas with unity covering fraction spread out over a region of at least ~100kpc from the AGN. Other, less thick absorption components are associated with Ly-alpha emitting gas within a few tens of kpc from the radio galaxy and are connected by a bridge of emission. We speculate that this linear structure of dust, Ly-alpha and CO emission, and the redshifted absorption seen in the circum-nuclear region may represent an accretion flow feeding gas into this massive AGN host galaxy.
  • We present 4.5 {\mu}m luminosity functions for galaxies identified in 178 candidate galaxy clusters at 1.3 < z < 3.2. The clusters were identified as Spitzer/IRAC color-selected overdensities in the Clusters Around Radio-Loud AGN (CARLA) project, which imaged 421 powerful radio-loud AGN at z > 1.3. The luminosity functions are derived for different redshift and richness bins, and the IRAC imaging reaches depths of m*+2, allowing us to measure the faint end slopes of the luminosity functions. We find that {\alpha} = -1 describes the luminosity function very well in all redshifts bins and does not evolve significantly. This provides evidence that the rate at which the low mass galaxy population grows through star formation, gets quenched and is replenished by in-falling field galaxies does not have a major net effect on the shape of the luminosity function. Our measurements for m* are consistent with passive evolution models and high formation redshifts z_f ~ 3. We find a slight trend towards fainter m* for the richest clusters, implying that the most massive clusters in our sample could contain older stellar populations, yet another example of cosmic downsizing. Modelling shows that a contribution of a star-forming population of up to 40% cannot be ruled out. This value, found from our targeted survey, is significantly lower than the values found for slightly lower redshift, z ~ 1, clusters found in wide-field surveys. The results are consistent with cosmic downsizing, as the clusters studied here were all found in the vicinity of radio-loud AGNs -- which have proven to be preferentially located in massive dark matter halos in the richest environments at high redshift -- they may therefore be older and more evolved systems than the general protocluster population.
  • We present the spectroscopic confirmation of a structure of galaxies surrounding the radio galaxy MRC0156-252 at z = 2.02. The structure was initially discovered as an overdensity of both near-infrared selected z > 1.6 and mid-infrared selected z > 1.2 galaxy candidates. We used the VLT/FORS2 multi-object spectrograph to target ~80 high-redshift galaxy candidates, and obtain robust spectroscopic redshifts for more than half the targets. The majority of the confirmed sources are star-forming galaxies at z > 1.5. In addition to the radio galaxy, two of its close-by companions (< 6'') also show AGN signatures. Ten sources, including the radio galaxy, lie within |z - 2.020 | < 0.015 (i.e., velocity offsets < 1500 km/s) and within projected 2 Mpc comoving of the radio galaxy. Additional evidence suggests not only that the galaxy structure associated with MRC0156-252 is a forming galaxy cluster but also that this structure is most probably embedded in a larger scale structure.
  • The new evolutionary code Pegase.3 is used for the spectral synthesis of continuous optical-Spitzer-Herschel-submm spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of two z=3.8 radio galaxies 4C 41.17 and TN J2007-1316. Both galaxies are selected from the Herschel Radio Galaxy Evolution Project for their faint AGN contribution and because they show evidence of a large stellar contribution to their bolometric luminosity. Pegase.3 coherently models the reprocessing of the stellar luminosity to dust emission, allowing to build UV to IR-submm libraries by types. These templates allow to predict SEDs at redshifts z in the observer's frame by using z=0 templates corrected for cosmology and evolution. Our best fits are a sum of two distinct evolving stellar populations: i) a very massive starburst observed ~30 Myrs after formation from optical and far-IR peaks ii) a significantly older (~1Gyr old) massive early-type population revealed from mid-IR Spitzer data. The AGN emission fits a roughly thermal model. These results confirm that many of the stellar populations in high-z radio galaxies were already formed by massive (a few thousands of billion solar masses) starbursts at z=4, confirming the previous K-z diagram interpretation. Gas-rich mergers and/or jet-cloud interactions are favored for triggering the intense star formation, possibly in relation with massive super black holes of these radio galaxies. These multiple stellar populations may be a generic feature of the luminous infrared radio galaxy population as a whole and strongly constrain mass accumulation and galaxy formation models.
  • We present the mid-infrared spectra of seven of the most powerful radio-galaxies known to exist at 1.5 < z < 2.6. The radio emission of these sources is dominated by the AGN with 500 MHz luminosities in the range 10^27.8 - 10^29.1 W/Hz. The AGN signature is clearly evident in the mid-infrared spectra, however, we also detect polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons emission, indicative of prodigious star formation at a rate of up to ~1000 Msun/yr. Interestingly, we observe no significant correlation between AGN power and star formation in the host galaxy. We also find most of these radio galaxies to have weak 9.7 um silicate absorption features (tau_{9.7 um} < 0.8) which implies that their mid-IR obscuration is predominantly due to the dusty torus that surrounds the central engine, rather than the host galaxy. The tori are likely to have an inhomogeneous distribution with the obscuring structure consisting of individual clouds. We estimate that these radio galaxies have already formed the bulk of their stellar mass and appear to lie at a stage in their evolution where the obscured AGN dominates the energy output of the system but star formation is also prevalent.
  • Taking advantage of the impressive sensitivity of Spitzer to detect massive galaxies at high redshift, we study the mid-infrared environments of powerful, high-redshift radio galaxies at 1.2<z<3. Galaxy cluster member candidates were isolated using a single Spitzer/IRAC mid-infrared color criterion, [3.6]-[4.5]>-0.1 (AB), in the fields of 48 radio galaxies at 1.2<z<3. This simple IRAC color selection is effective at identifying galaxies at z>1.2. Using a counts-in-cell analysis, we identify a field as overdense when 15 or more red IRAC sources are found within 1arcmin (i.e.,~0.5Mpc at 1.2<z<3) of the radio galaxy to the 5sigma flux density limits of our IRAC data (f3.6=11.0uJy, f4.5=13.4uJy). We find that radio galaxies lie preferentially in medium to dense regions, with 73% of the targeted fields denser than average. Our (shallow) 120s data permit the rediscovery of previously known clusters and protoclusters associated with radio galaxies as well as the discovery of new promising galaxy cluster candidates at z>1.2.
  • We present a statistical study of the environments of 63 high-redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs) between redshifts 1<z<5.2, using the 24um, waveband of the MIPS instrument aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. Using a counts-in-cell analysis, a statistically significant source overdensity is found in 1.75arcmin radius circular cells centred on the HzRGs when compared to reference fields. We report an average overdensity of delta (= {N}_{targets} / {N}_{reference}) = 2.2 +/- 1.2 at a flux density cut of f24um=0.3mJy. This result implies that HzRGs are likely to lie in protoclusters of active and star-forming galaxies at high redshift. Over 95% of our targeted HzRGs lie in higher than average density fields. Further, 20 (32%) of our selected fields are found to be overdense to at least a 3sigma significance, of which 9 are newly identified protocluster candidates. We observe a weak correlation between redshift and 24um, source density, and discuss the populations being probed at different redshifts. In our uniformly selected sample, which was designed to cover two orders of magnitude in radio luminosity throughout z=1-4, we find that the 24um, source density does not depend on radio luminosity. We also compare this result with recent work describing IRAC source overdensities around the same HzRGs and find correlations between the results.
  • X-shooter is the first 2nd generation instrument of the ESO Very Large Telescope(VLT). It is a very efficient, single-target, intermediate-resolution spectrograph that was installed at the Cassegrain focus of UT2 in 2009. The instrument covers, in a single exposure, the spectral range from 300 to 2500 nm. It is designed to maximize the sensitivity in this spectral range through dichroic splitting in three arms with optimized optics, coatings, dispersive elements and detectors. It operates at intermediate spectral resolution (R~4,000 - 17,000, depending on wavelength and slit width) with fixed echelle spectral format (prism cross-dispersers) in the three arms. It includes a 1.8"x4" Integral Field Unit as an alternative to the 11" long slits. A dedicated data reduction package delivers fully calibrated two-dimensional and extracted spectra over the full wavelength range. We describe the main characteristics of the instrument and present its performance as measured during commissioning, science verification and the first months of science operations.
  • The data reduction pipeline for the VLT 2nd generation instrument X-Shooter uses a physical model to determine the optical distortion and derive the wavelength calibration. The parameters of this model describe the positions, orientations, and other physical properties of the optical components in the spectrograph. They are updated by an optimisation process that ensures the best possible fit to arc lamp line positions. ESO Quality Control monitors these parameters along with all of the usual diagnostics. This enables us to look for correlations between inferred physical changes in the instrument and, for example, instrument temperature sensor readings.
  • We present a study of protoclusters associated with high redshift radio galaxies. We imaged MRC1017-220 (z=1.77) and MRC0156-252 (z=2.02) using the near-infrared wide-field (7.5'x7.5') imager VLT/HAWK-I in the Y, H and Ks bands. We present the first deep Y-band galaxy number counts within a large area (200 arcmin2). We then develop a purely near-infrared colour selection technique to isolate galaxies at 1.6<z<3 that may be associated with the two targets, dividing them into (i) red passively evolving or dusty star-forming galaxies or (ii) blue/star-formation dominated galaxies with little or no dust. Both targeted fields show an excess of star-forming galaxies with respect to control fields. No clear overdensity of red galaxies is detected in the surroundings of MRC1017-220 although the spatial distribution of the red galaxies resembles a filament-like structure within which the radio galaxy is embedded. In contrast, a significant overdensity of red galaxies is detected in the field of MRC0156-252, ranging from a factor of 2-3 times the field density at large scales (2.5Mpc, angular distance) up to a factor of 3-4 times the field density within a 1Mpc radius of the radio galaxy. Half of these red galaxies have colours consistent with red sequence models at z~2, with a large fraction being bright (Ks<21.5, i.e. massive). In addition, we also find a small group of galaxies within 5" of MRC0156-252 suggesting that the radio galaxy has multiple companions within ~50 kpc. We conclude that the field of MRC0156-252 shows many remarkable similarities with the well-studied protocluster surrounding PKS1138-262 (z=2.16) suggesting that MRC0156-252 is associated with a galaxy protocluster at z~2.
  • We confirm an eighth gravitational lens system in the CASSOWARY catalogue. Exploratory observations with the X-shooter spectrograph on the VLT show the system CSWA5 to consist of at least three images of a blue star-forming galaxy at z = 1.0686, lensed by an apparent foreground group of red galaxies one of which is at z = 0.3877. The lensed galaxy exhibits a rich spectrum with broad interstellar absorption lines and a wealth of nebular emission lines. Preliminary analysis of these features shows the galaxy to be young, with an age of 25-50 Myr. With a star-formation rate of approximately 20 solar masses/yr, the galaxy has already assembled a stellar mass of 3 x 10^9 solar masses and reached half-solar metallicity. Its blue spectral energy distribution and Balmer line ratios suggest negligible internal dust extinction. A more in-depth analysis of the properties of this system is currently hampered by the lack of a viable lensing model. However, it is already clear that CSWA5 shares many of its physical characteristics with the general population of UV-selected galaxies at redshifts z = 1-3, motivating further study of both the source and the foreground mass concentration responsible for the gravitational lensing.
  • We present spectroscopic follow-up of an overdensity of galaxies photometrically selected to be at 1.4<z<2.5 found in the vicinity of the radio galaxy 7C1756+6520 at z=1.4156. Using the DEIMOS optical multi-object spectrograph on the Keck 2 telescope, we observed a total of 129 BzK-selected sources, comprising 82 blue, star-forming galaxy candidates (sBzK) and 47 red, passively-evolving galaxy candidates (pBzK*), as well as 11 mid-infrared selected AGN candidates. We obtain robust spectroscopic redshifts for 36 blue galaxies, 7 red galaxies and 9 AGN candidates. Assuming all foreground interlopers were identified, we find that only 16% (9%) of the sBzK (pBzK*) galaxies are at z<1.4. Therefore, the BzK criteria are shown to be relatively robust at identifying galaxies at moderate redshifts. Twenty-one galaxies, including the radio galaxy, four additional AGN candidates and three red galaxy candidates are found with 1.4156 +/- 0.025, forming a large scale structure at the redshift of the radio galaxy. Of these, eight have projected offsets <2Mpc relative to the radio galaxy position and have velocity offsets <1000km/s relative to the radio galaxy redshift. This confirms that 7C1756+6520 is associated with a high-redshift galaxy cluster. A second compact group of four galaxies is found at z~1.437, forming a sub-group offset by Dv~3000km/s and approximately 1.5' east of the radio galaxy.
  • We explore the environments of two radio galaxies at z~1.5, 7C1751+6809 and 7C1756+6520, using deep optical and near-infrared imaging. Our data cover 15'x15' fields around the radio galaxies. We develop and apply BzK color criteria to select cluster member candidates around the radio galaxies and find no evidence of an overdensity of red galaxies within 2Mpc of 7C1751+6809. In contrast, 7C1756+6520 shows a significant overdensity of red galaxies within 2Mpc of the radio galaxy, by a factor of 3.1 +/- 0.8 relative to the four MUSYC fields. At small separation (r<6''), this radio galaxy also has one z~1.4 evolved galaxy candidate, one z~1.4 star-forming galaxy candidate, and an AGN candidate (at indeterminate redshift). This is suggestive of several close-by companions. Several concentrations of red galaxies are also noticed in the full 7C1756+6520 field, forming a possible large-scale structure of evolved galaxies with a NW-SE orientation. We construct the color-magnitude diagram of red galaxies found near (r<2Mpc) 7C1756+6520, and find a clear red sequence that is truncated at Ks~21.5 (AB). We also find an overdensity of mid-IR selected AGN in the surroundings of 7C1756+6520. These results are suggestive of a proto-cluster at high redshift.
  • While the radio-loud, obscured quasars (the radio galaxies) have been known and studied for decades, new and sensitive X-ray and mid-infrared surveys are now beginning to reveal large numbers of their radio-quiet counterparts beyond the local Universe. Consequently, we are approaching the compilation of a relatively complete census of AGN of all types coving a large fraction of cosmic time. This is revealing a remarkably intimate connection between the supermassive black hole and its host galaxy. The workshop reported here was designed to explore the results of these rapid observational developments and the nature of the relationships between the stellar and AGN components.
  • We present the results of a comprehensive Spitzer survey of 69 radio galaxies across 1<z<5.2. Using IRAC (3.6-8.0um), IRS (16um) and MIPS (24-160um) imaging, we decompose the rest-frame optical to infrared spectral energy distributions into stellar, AGN, and dust components and determine the contribution of host galaxy stellar emission at rest-frame H-band. Stellar masses derived from rest-frame near-IR data, where AGN and young star contributions are minimized, are significantly more reliable than those derived from rest-frame optical and UV data. We find that the fraction of emitted light at rest-frame H-band from stars is >60% for ~75% the high redshift radio galaxies. As expected from unified models of AGN, the stellar fraction of the rest-frame H-band luminosity has no correlation with redshift, radio luminosity, or rest-frame mid-IR (5um) luminosity. Additionally, while the stellar H-band luminosity does not vary with stellar fraction, the total H-band luminosity anti-correlates with the stellar fraction as would be expected if the underlying hosts of these radio galaxies comprise a homogeneous population. The resultant stellar luminosities imply stellar masses of 10^{11-11.5}Msun even at the highest redshifts. Powerful radio galaxies tend to lie in a similar region of mid-IR color-color space as unobscured AGN, despite the stellar contribution to their mid-IR SEDs at shorter-wavelengths. The mid-IR luminosities alone classify most HzRGs as LIRGs or ULIRGs with even higher total-IR luminosities. As expected, these exceptionally high mid-IR luminosities are consistent with an obscured, highly-accreting AGN. We find a weak correlation of stellar mass with radio luminosity.
  • We present redshifts for 115 emission line objects in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) identified through the GRism ACS Program for Extragalactic Science (GRAPES) project using the slitless grism spectroscopy mode of the ACS Camera on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The sample was selected by an emission line search on all extracted 1-dimensional GRAPES spectra. We identify the emission lines using line wavelength ratios where multiple lines are detected in the grism wavelength range (5800A < lambda < 9600A), and using photometric redshift information where multiple lines are unavailable. We then derive redshifts using the identified lines. Our redshifts are accurate to delta(z) = 0.009, based on both statistical uncertainty estimates and comparison with published ground-based spectra. Over 40% of our sample is fainter than typical magnitude limits for ground-based spectroscopy (with i_{AB}>25 mag). Such emission lines would likely remain undiscovered without our deep survey. The emission line objects fall into 3 categories: 1) Most are low to moderate redshift galaxies (0 < z < 2), including many actively star forming galaxies with strong HII regions; 2) 9 are high redshift (4 < z < 7) Lyman-alpha emitters; and 3) at least 3 are candidate AGNs.
  • We have discovered an extended Lyman alpha plume associated with a compact source at redshift 5.4 in slitless spectroscopic data from the Grism ACS Program for Extragalactic Science (GRAPES) project. The spatial extent of the emission is about 6 x 1.5 kpc (1 x 0.25 arcsec). Combining our grism data and the broadband images from the Hubble UltraDeep Field (UDF) images, we find a Lyman alpha line flux of 2e-17 erg/cm2/s and surface brightness 7e-17 erg/cm2/s/arcsec2. The UDF images show diffuse continuum emission associated with the Lyman alpha plume (hereafter UDF 5225), with three embedded knots. The morphology of UDF 5225 is highly suggestive of a galaxy in assembly. It is moreover possible that the prominent Lyman alpha emission from this object is due to an active nucleus, and that we are seeing the simultaneous growth through accretion of a galaxy and its central black hole. Followup observations at higher spectral resolution could test this hypothesis.
  • From optical spectropolarimetry of Cygnus A we conclude that the scattering medium in the ionization cones in Cygnus A is moving outward at a speed of 170+-34 km/s, and that the required momentum can be supplied by the radiation pressure of an average quasar. Such a process could produce a structure resembling the observed ionization cones, which are thought to result from shadowing by a circumnuclear dust torus. We detect a polarized red wing in the [O III] emission lines arising from the central kiloparsec of Cygnus A. This wing is consistent with line emission created close to the boundary of the broad-line region.
  • We present deep optical spectropolarimety of SMM J02399-0136 (z=2.8) done with the VLT Antu 8.2 m telescope equipped with FORS1. Moderate continuum and emission line polarization are measured (P~5%). We do not detect broad lines in scattered flux as would be expected for a type-2 object but rather a polarization behaviour similar to BAL quasars. This classification is confirmed by the detection of both high and low ionization broad absorption troughs and a very red continuum. We argue that this object shares several properties with local ULIGs such as Mrk 231 and other ultraluminous infrared Lo-BAL quasars. However, the fact that the ultraviolet spectrum is dominated by non-stellar radiation does not prove that the dust that is thermally radiating in the far infrared is predominantly heated by the AGN. Since the energy that we get in the far-infrared is precisely that which is removed from the ultraviolet spectrum, this could mean that the starburst is more dust-enshrouded than the AGN due to a peculiar dust distribution. The limits we place on the putative starburst contribution to the restframe ultraviolet continuum together with constraints on the amount of extinction provides an upper limit to the star formation rate of about 2000 Msun/yr, consistent with previously claimed high star formation rate in this object.
  • We present the results of deep spectropolarimetry of two powerful radio galaxies at $z\sim2.5$ (4C 00.54 and 4C 23.56) obtained with the W.M. Keck II 10m telescope, aimed at studying the relative contribution of the stellar and non-stellar components to the ultraviolet continuum. Both galaxies show strong linear polarization of the continuum between rest-frame $\sim$1300-2000~\AA, and the orientation of the electric vector is perpendicular to the main axis of the UV continuum. In this sense, our objects are like most 3C radio galaxies at $z\sim1$. The total flux spectra of 4C 00.54 and 4C 23.56 do not show the strong P-Cygni absorption features or the photospheric absorption lines expected when the UV continuum is dominated by young and massive stars. The only features detected can be ascribed to interstellar absorptions by SiII, CII and OI. Our results are similar to those for 3C radio galaxies at lower $z$, suggesting that the UV continuum of powerful radio galaxies at $z\sim2.5$ is still dominated by non-stellar radiation, and that young massive stars do not contribute more than $\approx$50% to the total continuum flux at 1500~\AA.