• Galaxy-cluster gravitational lenses can magnify background galaxies by a total factor of up to ~50. Here we report an image of an individual star at redshift z=1.49 (dubbed "MACS J1149 Lensed Star 1 (LS1)") magnified by >2000. A separate image, detected briefly 0.26 arcseconds from LS1, is likely a counterimage of the first star demagnified for multiple years by a >~3 solar-mass object in the cluster. For reasonable assumptions about the lensing system, microlensing fluctuations in the stars' light curves can yield evidence about the mass function of intracluster stars and compact objects, including binary fractions and specific stellar evolution and supernova models. Dark-matter subhalos or massive compact objects may help to account for the two images' long-term brightness ratio.
  • Recent studies have revealed intense UV metal emission lines in a modest sample of z>7 Lyman-alpha emitters, indicating a hard ionizing spectrum is present. If such high ionization features are shown to be common, it may indicate that extreme radiation fields play a role in regulating the visibility of Lyman-alpha in the reionization era. Here we present deep near-infrared spectra of seven galaxies with Lyman-alpha emission at 5.4<z<8.7 (including a newly-confirmed lensed galaxy at z=6.031) and three bright z>7 photometric targets. In nine sources we do not detect UV metal lines. However in the z=8.683 galaxy EGSY8p7, we detect a 4.6 sigma emission line in the narrow spectral window expected for NV 1243. The feature is unresolved (FWHM<90 km/s) and is likely nebular in origin. A deep H-band spectrum of EGSY8p7 reveals non-detections of CIV, He II, and OIII]. The presence of NV requires a substantial flux of photons above 77 eV, pointing to a hard ionizing spectrum powered by an AGN or fast radiative shocks. Regardless of its origin, the intense radiation field of EGSY8p7 may aid the transmission of Lyman-alpha through what is likely a partially neutral IGM. With this new detection, five of thirteen known Lyman-alpha emitters at z>7 have now been shown to have intense UV line emission, suggesting that extreme radiation fields are commonplace among the Lyman-alpha population. Future observations with JWST will eventually clarify the origin of these features and explain their role in the visibility of Lyman-alpha in the reionization era.
  • With the Hubble Frontier Fields program, gravitational lensing has provided a powerful way to extend the study of the ultraviolet luminosity function (LF) of galaxies at $z \sim 6$ down to unprecedented magnitude limits. At the same time, significant discrepancies between different studies were found at the very faint end of the LF. In an attempt to understand such disagreements, we present a comprehensive assessment of the uncertainties associated with the lensing models and the size distribution of galaxies. We use end-to-end simulations from the source plane to the final LF that account for all lensing effects and systematic uncertainties by comparing several mass models. In addition to the size distribution, the choice of lens model leads to large differences at magnitudes fainter than $M_{UV} = -15~$ AB mag, where the magnification factor becomes highly uncertain. We perform MCMC simulations that include all these uncertainties at the individual galaxy level to compute the final LF, allowing, in particular, a crossover between magnitude bins. The best LF fit, using a modified Schechter function that allows for a turnover at faint magnitudes, gives a faint-end slope of $\alpha = -2.01_{-0.14}^{+0.12}$, a curvature parameter of $\beta = 0.48_{-0.25}^{+0.49}$, and a turnover magnitude of $M_{T} = -14.93_{-0.52}^{+0.61}$. Most importantly our procedure shows that robust constraints on the LF at magnitudes fainter than $M_{UV} = -15~$ AB remain unrealistic. More accurate lens modeling and future observations of lensing clusters with the James Webb Space Telescope can reliably extend the UV LF to fainter magnitudes.
  • A galaxy cluster acts as a cosmic telescope over background galaxies but also as a cosmic microscope of the lens imperfections. The diverging magnification of lensing caustics enhances the microlensing effect of substructure present within the lensing mass. Fine-scale structure can be accessed as a moving background source brightens and disappears when crossing these caustics. The recent recognition of a distant lensed star near the Einstein radius of the galaxy cluster MACSJ1149.5+2223 (Kelly et al. 2017) allows the rare opportunity to reach subsolar mass microlensing through a super-critical column of cluster matter. Here we compare these observations with high-resolution ray-tracing simulations that include stellar microlensing set by the observed intracluster starlight and also primordial black holes that may be responsible for the recently observed LIGO events. We explore different scenarios with microlenses from the intracluster medium and black holes, including primordial ones, and examine strategies to exploit these unique alignments. We find that the best constraints on the fraction of compact dark matter in the small-mass regime can be obtained in regions of the cluster where the intracluster medium plays a negligible role. This new lensing phenomenon should be widespread and can be detected within modest-redshift lensed galaxies so that the luminosity distance is not prohibitive for detecting individual magnified stars. Continuous {\it Hubble Space Telescope} monitoring of several such optimal arcs will be rewarded by an unprecedented mass spectrum of compact objects that can contribute to uncovering the nature of dark matter.
  • Motivated by the preponderance of so-called "heavy black holes" in the binary black hole (BBH) gravitational wave (GW) detections to date, and the role that gravitational lensing continues to play in discovering new galaxy populations, we explore the possibility that the GWs are strongly-lensed by massive galaxy clusters. For example, if one of the GW sources were actually located at $z=1$, then the rest-frame mass of the associated BHs would be reduced by a factor $\sim2$. Based on the known populations of BBH GW sources and strong-lensing clusters, we estimate a conservative lower limit on the number of BBH mergers detected per detector year at LIGO/Virgo's current sensitivity that are multiply-imaged, of $R_{\rm detect}\simeq10^{-5}{\rm yr}^{-1}$. This is equivalent to rejecting the hypothesis that one of the BBH GWs detected to date was multiply-imaged at $<\sim4\sigma$. It is therefore unlikely but not impossible that one of the GWs is multiply-imaged. We identify three spectroscopically confirmed strong-lensing clusters with well constrained mass models within the $90\%$ credible sky localisations of the BBH GWs from LIGO's first observing run. In the event that one of these clusters multiply-imaged one of the BBH GWs, we predict that $20-60\%$ of the putative next appearances of the GWs would be detectable by LIGO, and that they would arrive at Earth within three years of first detection.
  • We report the discovery of a 10^4 kpc^2 gaseous structure detected in [OII] in an over-dense region of the COSMOS-Gr30 galaxy group at z~0.725 thanks to deep MUSE Guaranteed Time Observations. We estimate the total amount of diffuse ionised gas to be of the order of (~5+-3)x10^10 Msun and explore its physical properties to understand its origin and the source(s) of the ionisation. The MUSE data allow the identification of a dozen of group members embedded in this structure from emission and absorption lines. We extracted spectra from small apertures defined for both the diffuse ionised gas and the galaxies. We investigated the kinematics and ionisation properties of the various galaxies and extended gas regions thanks to line diagnostics (R23, O32 and [OIII]/H\beta) available within the MUSE wavelength range. We compared these diagnostics to photo-ionisation models and shock models. The structure is divided in two kinematically distinct sub-structures. The most extended sub-structure of ionised gas is likely rotating around a massive galaxy and displays filamentary patterns linking some galaxies. The second sub-structure links another massive galaxy hosting an Active Galactic Nucleus to a low mass galaxy but also extends orthogonally to the AGN host disk over ~35 kpc. This extent is likely ionised by the AGN itself. The location of small diffuse regions in the R23 vs. O32 diagram is compatible with photo-ionisation. However, the location of three of these regions in this diagram (low O32, high R23) can also be explained by shocks, which is supported by their large velocity dispersions. One edge-on galaxy shares the same properties and may be a source of shocks. Whatever the hypothesis, the extended gas seems to be non primordial. We favour a scenario where the gas has been extracted from galaxies by tidal forces and AGN triggered by interactions between at least the two sub-structures.
  • We present the results of a multiwavelength investigation of the very X-ray luminous galaxy cluster MACSJ0553.4-3342 ($z = 0.4270$; hereafter MACSJ0553). Combining high-resolution data obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope and the Chandra X-ray Observatory with ground-based galaxy spectroscopy, our analysis establishes the system unambiguously as a binary, post-collision merger of massive clusters. Key characteristics include perfect alignment of luminous and dark matter for one component, a separation of almost 650 kpc (in projection) between the dark-matter peak of the other subcluster and the second X-ray peak, extremely hot gas (k$T > 15$ keV) at either end of the merger axis, a potential cold front in the east, an unusually low gas mass fraction of approximately 0.075 for the western component, a velocity dispersion of $1490_{-130}^{+104}$ km s$^{-1}$, and no indication of significant substructure along the line of sight. We propose that the MACSJ0553 merger proceeds not in the plane of the sky, but at a large inclination angle, is observed very close to turnaround, and that the eastern X-ray peak is the cool core of the slightly less massive western component that was fully stripped and captured by the eastern subcluster during the collision. If correct, this hypothesis would make MACSJ0553 a superb target for a competitive study of ram-pressure stripping and the collisional behaviour of luminous and dark matter during cluster formation.
  • The C III] 1907,1909 emission doublet has been proposed as an alternative to Lyman-alpha in redshift confirmations of galaxies at z > 6 since it is not attenuated by the largely neutral intergalactic medium at these redshifts and is believed to be strong in the young, vigorously star-forming galaxies present at these early cosmic times. We present a statistical sample of 17 C III]-emitting galaxies beyond z~1.5 using 30 hour deep VLT/MUSE integral field spectroscopy covering 2 square arcminutes in the Hubble Deep Field South (HDFS) and Ultra Deep Field (UDF), achieving C III] sensitivities of ~2e-17 erg/s/cm^2 in the HDFS and ~7e-18 erg/s/cm^2 in the UDF. The rest-frame equivalent widths range from 2 to 19 Angstroms. These 17 galaxies represent ~3% of the total sample of galaxies found between 1.5 < z < 4. They also show elevated star formation rates, lower dust attenuation, and younger mass-weighted ages than the general population of galaxies at the same redshifts. Combined with deep slitless grism spectroscopy from the HST/WFC3 in the UDF, we can tie the rest-frame ultraviolet C III] emission to rest-frame optical emission lines, namely [O III] 5007, finding a strong correlation between the two. Down to the flux limits that we observe (~1e-18 erg/s/cm^2 with the grism data in the UDF), all objects with a rest-frame [O III] 4959,5007 equivalent width in excess of 250 Angstroms, the so-called Extreme Emission Line Galaxies, have detections of C III] in our MUSE data. More detailed studies of the C III]-emitting population at these intermediate redshifts will be crucial to understand the physical conditions in galaxies at early cosmic times and to determine the utility of C III] as a redshift tracer.
  • MUSE (Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer) is an integral-field spectrograph mounted on the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile and made available to the European community since October 2014. The Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon has developed a dedicated software to help MUSE users analyze the reduced data. In this paper we introduce MPDAF, the MUSE Python Data Analysis Framework, based on several well-known Python libraries (Numpy, Scipy, Matplotlib, Astropy) which offers new tools to manipulate MUSE-specific data. We present different examples showing how this Python package may be useful for MUSE data analysis.
  • We present the MUSE Hubble Ultra Deep Survey, a mosaic of nine MUSE fields covering 90\% of the entire HUDF region with a 10-hour deep exposure time, plus a deeper 31-hour exposure in a single 1.15 arcmin2 field. The improved observing strategy and advanced data reduction results in datacubes with sub-arcsecond spatial resolution (0.65 arcsec at 7000 A) and accurate astrometry (0.07 arcsec rms). We compare the broadband photometric properties of the datacubes to HST photometry, finding a good agreement in zeropoint up to mAB=28 but with an increasing scatter for faint objects. We have investigated the noise properties and developed an empirical way to account for the impact of the correlation introduced by the 3D drizzle interpolation. The achieved 3 sigma emission line detection limit for a point source is 1.5 and 3.1 10-19 erg.s-1.cm-2 for the single ultra-deep datacube and the mosaic, respectively. We extracted 6288 sources using an optimal extraction scheme that takes the published HST source locations as prior. In parallel, we performed a blind search of emission line galaxies using an original method based on advanced test statistics and filter matching. The blind search results in 1251 emission line galaxy candidates in the mosaic and 306 in the ultradeep datacube, including 72 sources without HST counterparts (mAB>31). In addition 88 sources missed in the HST catalog but with clear HST counterparts were identified. This data set is the deepest spectroscopic survey ever performed. In just over 100 hours of integration time, it provides nearly an order of magnitude more spectroscopic redshifts compared to the data that has been accumulated on the UDF over the past decade. The depth and high quality of these datacubes enables new and detailed studies of the physical properties of the galaxy population and their environments over a large redshift range.
  • We analyze the properties of a multiply-imaged Lyman-alpha (Lya) emitter at z=5.75 identified through SHARDS Frontier Fields intermediate-band imaging of the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) cluster Abell 370. The source, A370-L57, has low intrinsic luminosity (M_UV~-16.5), steep UV spectral index (\beta=-2.4+/-0.1), and extreme rest-frame equivalent width of Lya (EW(Lya)=420+180-120 \AA). Two different gravitational lens models predict high magnification (\mu~10--16) for the two detected counter-images, separated by 7", while a predicted third counter-image (\mu~3--4) is undetected. We find differences of ~50% in magnification between the two lens models, quantifying our current systematic uncertainties. Integral field spectroscopy of A370-L57 with MUSE shows a narrow (FWHM=204+/-10 km/s) and asymmetric Lya profile with an integrated luminosity L(Lya)~10^42 erg/s. The morphology in the HST bands comprises a compact clump (r_e<100 pc) that dominates the Lya and continuum emission and several fainter clumps at projected distances <1 kpc that coincide with an extension of the Lya emission in the SHARDS F823W17 and MUSE observations. The latter could be part of the same galaxy or an interacting companion. We find no evidence of contribution from AGN to the Lya emission. Fitting of the spectral energy distribution with stellar population models favors a very young (t<10 Myr), low mass (M*~10^6.5 Msun), and metal poor (Z<4x10^-3) stellar population. Its modest star formation rate (SFR~1.0 Msun/yr) implies high specific SFR (sSFR~2.5x10^-7 yr^-1) and SFR density (Sigma_SFR ~ 7-35 Msun/yr/kpc^2). The properties of A370-L57 make it a good representative of the population of galaxies responsible for cosmic reionization.
  • Recent theoretical models suggest that the early phase of galaxy formation could involve an epoch when galaxies are gas-rich but inefficient at forming stars: a "dark galaxy" phase. Here, we report the results of our MUSE (Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer) survey for dark galaxies fluorescently illuminated by quasars at $z>3$. Compared to previous studies which are based on deep narrow-band (NB) imaging, our integral field survey provides a nearly uniform sensitivity coverage over a large volume in redshift space around the quasars as well as full spectral information at each location. Thanks to these unique features, we are able to build control samples at large redshift distances from the quasars using the same data taken under the same conditions. By comparing the rest-frame equivalent width (EW$_{0}$) distributions of the Ly$\alpha$ sources detected in proximity to the quasars and in control samples, we detect a clear correlation between the locations of high EW$_{0}$ objects and the quasars. This correlation is not seen in other properties such as Ly$\alpha$ luminosities or volume overdensities, suggesting the possible fluorescent nature of at least some of these objects. Among these, we find 6 sources without continuum counterparts and EW$_{0}$ limits larger than $240\,\mathrm{\AA}$ that are the best candidates for dark galaxies in our survey at $z>3.5$. The volume densities and properties, including inferred gas masses and star formation efficiencies, of these dark galaxy candidates are similar to previously detected candidates at $z\approx2.4$ in NB surveys. Moreover, if the most distant of these are fluorescently illuminated by the quasar, our results also provide a lower limit of $t=60$ Myr on the quasar lifetime.
  • We present a measurement of the fraction of Lyman $\alpha$ (Ly$\alpha$) emitters ($X_{\rm{Ly} \alpha}$) amongst HST continuum-selected galaxies at $3<z<6$ with the Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) on the VLT. Making use of the first 24 MUSE-Wide pointings in GOODS-South, each having an integration time of 1 hour, we detect 100 Ly$\alpha$ emitters and find $X_{\rm{Ly} \alpha}\gtrsim0.5$ for most of the redshift range covered, with 29% of the Ly$\alpha$ sample exhibiting rest equivalent widths (rest-EWs) $\leq$ 15\AA. Adopting a range of rest-EW cuts (0 - 75\AA), we find no evidence of a dependence of $X_{\rm{Ly} \alpha}$ on either redshift or UV luminosity.
  • We present integral field spectroscopy of galaxy cluster Abell 3827, using ALMA and VLT/MUSE. It reveals an unusual configuration of strong gravitational lensing in the cluster core, with at least seven lensed images of a single background spiral galaxy. Lens modelling based on HST imaging had suggested that the dark matter associated with one of the cluster's central galaxies may be offset. The new spectroscopic data enable better subtraction of foreground light, and better identification of multiple background images. The inferred distribution of dark matter is consistent with being centered on the galaxies, as expected by LCDM. Each galaxy's dark matter also appears to be symmetric. Whilst we do not find an offset between mass and light (suggestive of self-interacting dark matter) as previously reported, the numerical simulations that have been performed to calibrate Abell 3827 indicate that offsets and asymmetry are still worth looking for in collisions with particular geometries. Meanwhile, ALMA proves exceptionally useful for strong lens image identifications.
  • At redshift z = 2, when the Universe was just three billion years old, half of the most massive galaxies were extremely compact and had already exhausted their fuel for star formation(1-4). It is believed that they were formed in intense nuclear starbursts and that they ultimately grew into the most massive local elliptical galaxies seen today, through mergers with minor companions(5,6), but validating this picture requires higher-resolution observations of their centres than is currently possible. Magnification from gravitational lensing offers an opportunity to resolve the inner regions of galaxies(7). Here we report an analysis of the stellar populations and kinematics of a lensed z = 2.1478 compact galaxy, which surprisingly turns out to be a fast-spinning, rotationally supported disk galaxy. Its stars must have formed in a disk, rather than in a merger-driven nuclear starburst(8). The galaxy was probably fed by streams of cold gas, which were able to penetrate the hot halo gas until they were cut off by shock heating from the dark matter halo(9). This result confirms previous indirect indications(10-13) that the first galaxies to cease star formation must have gone through major changes not just in their structure, but also in their kinematics, to evolve into present-day elliptical galaxies.
  • Cosmological simulations suggest that most of the matter in the Universe is distributed along filaments connecting galaxies. Illuminated by the cosmic UV background (UVB), these structures are expected to glow in fluorescent Lyman alpha emission with a Surface Brightness (SB) that is well below current observational limits for individual detections. Here, we perform a stacking analysis of the deepest MUSE/VLT data using three-dimensional regions (subcubes) with orientations determined by the position of neighbouring Lyman alpha galaxies (LAEs) at 3<z<4. Our method should increase the probability of detecting filamentary Lyman alpha emission, provided that these structures are Lyman Limit Systems (LLSs). By stacking 390 oriented subcubes we reach a 2 sigma sensitivity level of SB ~ 0.44e-20 erg/s/cm^2/arcsec^2 in an aperture of 1 arcsec^2 x 6.25 Angstrom, which is three times below the expected fluorescent Lyman alpha signal from the Haardt-Madau 2012 (HM12) UVB at z~3.5. No detectable emission is found on intergalactic scales, implying that at least two thirds of our subcubes do not contain oriented LLSs for a HM12 UVB. On the other hand, significant emission is detected in the circum-galactic medium (CGM) of galaxies in the direction of the neighbours. The signal is stronger for galaxies with a larger number of neighbours and appears to be independent of any other galaxy properties such as luminosity, redshift and neighbour distance. We estimate that preferentially oriented satellite galaxies cannot contribute significantly to this signal, suggesting instead that gas densities in the CGM are typically larger in the direction of neighbouring galaxies on cosmological scales.
  • We present IFS-RedEx, a spectrum and redshift extraction pipeline for integral-field spectrographs. A key feature of the tool is a wavelet-based spectrum cleaner. It identifies reliable spectral features, reconstructs their shapes, and suppresses the spectrum noise. This gives the technique an advantage over conventional methods like Gaussian filtering, which only smears out the signal. As a result, the wavelet-based cleaning allows the quick identification of true spectral features. We test the cleaning technique with degraded MUSE spectra and find that it can detect spectrum peaks down to S/N = 8 while reporting no fake detections. We apply IFS-RedEx to MUSE data of the strong lensing cluster MACSJ1931.8-2635 and extract 54 spectroscopic redshifts. We identify 29 cluster members and 22 background galaxies with z >= 0.4. IFS-RedEx is open source and publicly available.
  • We present a method to recover the gas-phase metallicity gradients from integral field spectroscopic (IFS) observations of barely resolved galaxies. We take a forward modelling approach and compare our models to the observed spatial distribution of emission line fluxes, accounting for the degrading effects of seeing and spatial binning. The method is flexible and is not limited to particular emission lines or instruments. We test the model through comparison to synthetic observations and use downgraded observations of nearby galaxies to validate this work. As a proof of concept we also apply the model to real IFS observations of high-redshift galaxies. From our testing we show that the inferred metallicity gradients and central metallicities are fairly insensitive to the assumptions made in the model and that they are reliably recovered for galaxies with sizes approximately equal to the half width at half maximum of the point-spread function. However, we also find that the presence of star forming clumps can significantly complicate the interpretation of metallicity gradients in moderately resolved high-redshift galaxies. Therefore we emphasize that care should be taken when comparing nearby well-resolved observations to high-redshift observations of partially resolved galaxies.
  • Emission signatures from galactic winds provide an opportunity to directly map the outflowing gas, but this is traditionally challenging because of the low surface brightness. Using deep observations (27 hours) of the Hubble Deep Field South from the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) instrument, we identify signatures of an outflow in both emission and absorption from a spatially resolved galaxy at z = 1.29 with a stellar mass M* = 8 x 10^9 Msun, star formation rate SFR = 77 Msun/yr, and star formation rate surface brightness 1.6 Msun/kpc^2 within the [OII] half-light radius R_1/2,[OII] = 2.76 +- 0.17 kpc. From a component of the strong resonant MgII and FeII absorptions at -350 km/s, we infer a mass outflow rate that is comparable to the star formation rate. We detect non-resonant FeII* emission, at lambda 2626, 2612, 2396, and 2365, at 1.2-2.4-1.5-2.7 x 10^-18 egs s-1 cm-2 respectively. These flux ratios are consistent with the expectations for optically thick gas. By combining the four non-resonant FeII* emission lines, we spatially map the FeII* emission from an individual galaxy for the first time. The FeII* emission has an elliptical morphology that is roughly aligned with the galaxy minor kinematic axis, and its integrated half-light radius R_1/2,FeII* = 4.1 +- 0.4 kpc is 50% larger than the stellar continuum (R_1/2,* = 2.34 +- 0.17 kpc) or the [OII] nebular line. Moreover, the FeII* emission shows a blue wing extending up to -400 km/s, which is more pronounced along the galaxy minor kinematic axis and reveals a C-shaped pattern in a p-v diagram along that axis. These features are consistent with a bi-conical outflow.
  • We present a MUSE and KMOS dynamical study 405 star-forming galaxies at redshift z=0.28-1.65 (median redshift z=0.84). Our sample are representative of star-forming, main-sequence galaxies, with star-formation rates of SFR=0.1-30Mo/yr and stellar masses M=10^8-10^11Mo. For 49+/-4% of our sample, the dynamics suggest rotational support, 24+/-3% are unresolved systems and 5+/-2% appear to be early-stage major mergers with components on 8-30kpc scales. The remaining 22+/-5% appear to be dynamically complex, irregular (or face-on systems). For galaxies whose dynamics suggest rotational support, we derive inclination corrected rotational velocities and show these systems lie on a similar scaling between stellar mass and specific angular momentum as local spirals with j*=J/M*\propto M^(2/3) but with a redshift evolution that scales as j*\propto M^{2/3}(1+z)^(-1). We identify a correlation between specific angular momentum and disk stability such that galaxies with the highest specific angular momentum, log(j*/M^(2/3))>2.5, are the most stable, with Toomre Q=1.10+/-0.18, compared to Q=0.53+/-0.22 for galaxies with log(j*/M^(2/3))<2.5. At a fixed mass, the HST morphologies of galaxies with the highest specific angular momentum resemble spiral galaxies, whilst those with low specific angular momentum are morphologically complex and dominated by several bright star-forming regions. This suggests that angular momentum plays a major role in defining the stability of gas disks: at z~1, massive galaxies that have disks with low specific angular momentum, appear to be globally unstable, clumpy and turbulent systems. In contrast, galaxies with high specific angular have evolved in to stable disks with spiral structures.
  • (Abridged) We consider the scientific case for a large aperture (10-12m class) optical spectroscopic survey telescope with a field of view comparable to that of LSST. Such a facility could enable transformational progress in several areas of astrophysics, and may constitute an unmatched capability for decades. Deep imaging from LSST and Euclid will provide accurate photometry for spectroscopic targets beyond the reach of 4m class instruments. Such a facility would revolutionise our understanding of the assembly and enrichment history of the Milky Way and the role of dark matter through chemo-dynamical studies of tens of millions of stars in the Local Group. Emission and absorption line spectroscopy of redshift z=2-5 galaxies can be used to directly chart the evolution of the cosmic web and examine its connection with activity in galaxies. The facility will also have synergistic impact, e.g. in following up live and transpired transients found with LSST, as well as providing targets and the local environmental conditions for follow-up studies with E-ELT and future space missions. Although our study is exploratory, we highlight a specific telescope design with a 5 square degree field of view and an additional focus that could host a next-generation panoramic IFU. We discuss some technical challenges and operational models and recommend a conceptual design study aimed at completing a more rigorous science case in the context of a costed technical design.
  • The gravitationally-lensed galaxy A1689-zD1 is one of the most distant spectroscopically confirmed sources ($z=7.5$). It is the earliest known galaxy where the interstellar medium (ISM) has been detected; dust emission was detected with the Atacama Large Millimetre Array (ALMA). A1689-zD1 is also unusual among high-redshift dust emitters as it is a sub-L* galaxy and is therefore a good prospect for the detection of gaseous ISM in a more typical galaxy at this redshift. We observed A1689-zD1 with ALMA in bands 6 and 7 and with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in band $Q$. To study the structure of A1689-zD1, we map the mm thermal dust emission and find two spatial components with sizes about $0.4-1.7$\,kpc (lensing-corrected). The rough spatial morphology is similar to what is observed in the near-infrared with {\it HST} and points to a perturbed dynamical state, perhaps indicative of a major merger or a disc in early formation. The ALMA photometry is used to constrain the far-infrared spectral energy distribution, yielding a dust temperature ($T_{\rm dust} \sim 35$--$45$\,K for $\beta = 1.5-2$). We do not detect the CO(3-2) line in the GBT data with a 95\% upper limit of 0.3\,mJy observed. We find a slight excess emission in ALMA band~6 at 220.9\,GHz. If this excess is real, it is likely due to emission from the [CII] 158.8\,$\mu$m line at $z_{\rm [CII]} = 7.603$. The stringent upper limits on the [CII]/$L_{\rm FIR}$ luminosity ratio suggest a [CII] deficit similar to several bright quasars and massive starbursts.
  • We present the results of a 135-arcmin$^2$ search for high-redshift galaxies lensed by 29 clusters from the MAssive Cluster and extended MAssive Cluster Surveys (MACS and eMACS). We use relatively shallow images obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope in four passbands, namely, F606W, F814W, F110W, and F140W. We identify 130 F814W dropouts as candidates for galaxies at $z \le 6$. In order to fit the available broad-band photometry to galaxy spectral energy distribution (SED) templates, we develop a prior for the level of dust extinction at various redshifts. We also investigate the systematic biases incurred by the use of SED-fit software. The fits we obtain yield an estimate of 20 Lyman-break galaxies with photometric redshifts from $z \sim 7$ to 9. In addition, our survey has identified over 100 candidates with a significant probability of being lower-redshift ($z \sim 2$) interlopers. We conclude that even as few as four broad-band filters -- when combined with fitting the SEDs -- are capable of isolating promising objects. Such surveys thus allow one both to probe the bright end ($M_{1500} \le -19$) of the high-redshift UV luminosity function and to identify candidate massive evolved galaxies at lower redshifts.
  • We present a ground-based near-infrared search for lensed supernovae behind the massive cluster Abell 1689 at z=0.18, one of the most powerful gravitational telescopes that nature provides. Our survey was based on multi-epoch $J$-band observations with the HAWK-I instrument on VLT, with supporting optical data from the Nordic Optical Telescope. Our search resulted in the discovery of five high-redshift, $0.671<z<1.703$, photometrically classified core-collapse supernovae with magnifications in the range $\Delta m$ = $-0.31$ to $-1.58$ mag, as calculated from lensing models in the literature. Thanks to the power of the lensing cluster, the survey had the sensitivity to detect supernovae up to very high-redshifts, $z$$\sim$$3$, albeit for a limited region of space. We present a study of the core-collapse supernova rates for $0.4\leq z< 2.9$, and find good agreement with both previous estimates, and the predictions from the star formation history. During our survey, we also discovered 2 type Ia supernovae in A1689 cluster members, which allowed us to determine the cluster Ia rate to be $0.14^{+0.19}_{-0.09}\pm0.01$ $\rm{SNuB}$$\,h^2$ (SNuB$\equiv 10^{-12} \,\rm{SNe} \, L^{-1}_{\odot,B} yr^{-1}$). The cluster rate normalized by the stellar mass is $0.10^{+0.13}_{-0.06}\pm0.02$ in $\rm SNuM$$\,h^2$ (SNuM$\equiv 10^{-12} \,\rm{SNe} \, M^{-1}_{\odot} yr^{-1}$). Furthermore, we explore the optimal future survey for improving the core-collapse supernova rate measurements at $z\gtrsim2$ using gravitational telescopes, as well as for the detections with multiply lensed images, and find that the planned WFIRST space mission has excellent prospects. Massive clusters can be used as gravitational telescopes to significantly expand the survey range of supernova searches, with important implications for the study of the high-$z$ transient universe.
  • The physical properties of galactic winds are one of the keys to understand galaxy formation and evolution. These properties can be constrained thanks to background quasar lines of sight (LOS) passing near star-forming galaxies (SFGs). We present the first results of the MusE GAs FLOw and Wind (MEGAFLOW) survey obtained of 2 quasar fields which have 8 MgII absorbers of which 3 have rest-equivalent width greater than 0.8 \AA. With the new Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope (VLT), we detect 6 (75$\%$) MgII host galaxy candidates withing a radius of 30 arcsec from the quasar LOS. Out of these 6 galaxy--quasar pairs, from geometrical arguments, one is likely probing galactic outflows, two are classified as "ambiguous", two are likely probing extended gaseous disks and one pair seems to be a merger. We focus on the wind$-$pair and constrain the outflow using a high resolution quasar spectra from Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES). Assuming the metal absorption to be due to gas flowing out of the detected galaxy through a cone along the minor axis, we find outflow velocities of the order of $\approx$ 150 km/s (i.e. smaller than the escape velocity) with a loading factor, $\eta =\dot M_{\rm out}/$SFR, of $\approx$ 0.7. We see evidence for an open conical flow, with a low-density inner core. In the future, MUSE will provide us with about 80 multiple galaxy$-$quasar pairs in two dozen fields.