• Controlling functionalities, such as magnetism or ferroelectricity, by means of oxygen vacancies (VO) is a key issue for the future development of transition metal oxides. Progress in this field is currently addressed through VO variations and their impact on mainly one order parameter. Here we reveal a new mechanism for tuning both magnetism and ferroelectricity simultaneously by using VO. Combined experimental and density-functional theory studies of Eu0.5Ba0.5TiO3-{\delta}, we demonstrate that oxygen vacancies create Ti3+ 3d1 defect states, mediating the ferromagnetic coupling between the localized Eu 4f7 spins, and increase an off-center displacement of Ti ions, enhancing the ferroelectric Curie temperature. The dual function of Ti sites also promises a magnetoelectric coupling in the Eu0.5Ba0.5TiO3-{\delta}.
  • Elastic strain is potentially an important approach in tuning the properties of the improperly multiferroic hexagonal ferrites, the details of which have however been elusive due to the experimental difficulties. Employing the method of restrained thermal expansion, we have studied the effect of isothermal biaxial strain in the basal plane of h-LuFeO3 (001) films. The results indicate that a compressive biaxial strain significantly enhances the ferrodistortion, and the effect is larger at higher temperatures. The compressive biaxial strain and the enhanced ferrodistortion together, cause an increase in the electric polarization and a reduction in the canting of the weak ferromagnetic moments in h-LuFeO3, according to our first principle calculations. These findings are important for understanding the strain effect as well as the coupling between the lattice and the improper multiferroicity in h-LuFeO3. The experimental elucidation of the strain effect in h-LuFeO3 films also suggests that the restrained thermal expansion can be a viable method to unravel the strain effect in many other epitaxial thin film materials.
  • Here we follow, both experimentally and theoretically, the development of magnetism in Tb clusters from the atomic limit, adding one atom at a time. The exchange interaction is, surprisingly, observed to drastically increase compared to that of bulk, and to exhibit irregular oscillations as a function of the interatomic distance. From electronic structure theory we find that the theoretical magnetic moments oscillate with cluster size in exact agreement with experimental data. Unlike the bulk, the oscillation is not caused by the RKKY mechanism. Instead, the inter-atomic exchange is shown to be driven by a competition between wave-function overlap of the 5d shell and the on-site exchange interaction, which leads to a competition between ferromagnetic double-exchange and antiferromagnetic super-exchange. This understanding opens up new ways to tune the magnetic properties of rare-earth based magnets with nano-sized building blocks.
  • Small lanthanide clusters have interesting magnetic properties, but their structures are unknown. We have identified the structures of small terbium cluster cations Tb (n = 5-9) in the gas phase, by analysis of their vibrational spectra. The spectra have been measured via IR multiple photon dissociation of their complexes with Ar atoms in the 50-250 1/cm range with an infrared free electron laser. Density functional theory calculations using a 4f-in-core effective core potential (ECP) accurately reproduce the experimental far-IR spectra. The ECP corresponds to a 4f85d16s2 trivalent configuration of terbium. The assigned structures are similar to those observed in several other transition metal systems. From this, we conclude that the bonding in Tb clusters is through the interactions between the 5d and 6s electrons, and that the 4f electrons have only an indirect effect on the cluster structures.
  • Cryogenic cluster beam experiments have provided crucial insights into the evolution of the metallic state from the atom to the bulk. Surprisingly, one of the most fundamental metallic properties, the ability of a metal to efficiently screen electric fields, is still poorly understood in small clusters. Theory has predicted that many small Na clusters are unable to screen charge inhomogeneities and thus have permanent dipole moments. High precision electric deflection experiments on cryogenically cooled Na$_N$ ($N<200$) clusters show that the electric dipole moments are at least an order of magnitude smaller than predicted, and are consistent with zero, as expected for a metal. The polarizabilities of Na clusters also show metal spheroid behavior, with fine size oscillations caused by the shell structure.
  • The cobalt and iron clusters CoN, FeN (20 < N < 150) measured in a cryogenic molecular beam are found to be bistable with magnetic moments per atom both {\mu}N/N 2{\mu}B in the ground states and {\mu}N */N {\mu}B in the metastable excited states (for iron clusters, {\mu}N ~3N{\mu}B and {\mu}N* N{\mu}B). This energy gap between the two states vanish for large clusters, which explains the rapid convergence of the magnetic moments to the bulk value and suggests that ground state for the bulk involves a superposition of the two, in line with the fluctuating local orders in the bulk itinerant ferromagnetism.
  • Electric deflections of niobium clusters in molecular beams show that they have permanent electric dipole moments at cryogenic temperatures but not higher temperatures, indicating that they are ferroelectric. Detailed analysis shows that the deflections cannot be explained in terms of a rotating classical dipole, as claimed by Anderson et al. The shapes of the deflected beam profiles and their field and temperature dependences indicates that the clusters can exist in two states, one with a dipole and the other without. Cluster with dipoles occupy lower energy states. Excitations from the lower states to the higher states can be induced by low fluence laser excitation. This causes the dipole to vanish.