• Since the discovery of spin glasses in dilute magnetic systems, their study has been largely focused on understanding randomness and defects as the driving mechanism. The same paradigm has also been applied to explain glassy states found in dense frustrated systems. Recently, however, it has been theoretically suggested that different mechanisms, such as quantum fluctuations and topological features, may induce glassy states in defect-free spin systems, far from the conventional dilute limit. Here we report experimental evidence for the existence of a glassy state, that we call a spin jam, in the vicinity of the clean limit of a frustrated magnet, which is insensitive to a low concentration of defects. We have studied the effect of impurities on SrCr9pGa12-9pO19 (SCGO(p)), a highly frustrated magnet, in which the magnetic Cr3+ (s=3/2) ions form a quasi-two-dimensional triangular system of bi-pyramids. Our experimental data shows that as the nonmagnetic Ga3+ impurity concentration is changed, there are two distinct phases of glassiness: a distinct exotic glassy state, which we call a "spin jam", for high magnetic concentration region (p>0.8) and a cluster spin glass for lower magnetic concentration, (p<0.8). This observation indicates that a spin jam is a unique vantage point from which the class of glassy states in dense frustrated magnets can be understood.
  • Co3V2O8 is an orthorhombic magnet in which S=3/2 magnetic moments reside on two crystallographically inequivalent Co2+ sites, which decorate a stacked, buckled version of the two dimensional kagome lattice, the stacked kagome staircase. The magnetic interactions between the Co2+ moments in this structure lead to a complex magnetic phase diagram at low temperature, wherein it exhibits a series of five transitions below 11 K that ultimately culminate in a simple ferromagnetic ground state below T~6.2 K. Here we report magnetization measurements on single and polycrystalline samples of (Co(1-x)Mg(x))3V2O8 for x<0.23, as well as elastic and inelastic neutron scattering measurements on single crystals of magnetically dilute (Co(1-x)Mg(x))3V2O8 for x=0.029 and x=0.194, in which non-magnetic Mg2+ ions substitute for magnetic Co2+. We find that a dilution of 2.9% leads to a suppression of the ferromagnetic transition temperature by ~15% while a dilution level of 19.4% is sufficient to destroy ferromagnetic long-range order in this material down to a temperature of at least 1.5 K. The magnetic excitation spectrum is characterized by two spin-wave branches in the ordered phase for (Co(1-x)Mg(x))3V2O8 (x=0.029), similar to that of the pure x=0 material, and by broad diffuse scattering at temperatures below 10 K in (Co(1-x)Mg(x))3V2O8 (x=0.194). Such a strong dependence of the transition temperatures to long range order in the presence of quenched non-magnetic impurities is consistent with two-dimensional physics driving the transitions. We further provide a simple percolation model that semi-quantitatively explains the inability of this system to establish long-range magnetic order at the unusually-low dilution levels which we observe in our experiments.