• Due to their relation to massive stars, long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) allow pinpointing star formation in galaxies independently of redshift, dust obscuration, or galaxy mass/size, thus providing a unique tool to investigate the star-formation history over cosmic time. About half of the optical afterglows of long-duration GRBs are missed due to dust extinction, and are primarily located in the most massive GRB hosts. In order to understand this bias it is important to investigate the amount of obscured star-formation in these GRB host galaxies. Radio emission of galaxies correlates with star-formation, but does not suffer extinction as do the optical star-formation estimators. We selected 11 GRB host galaxies with either large stellar mass or large UV-/optical-based star-formation rates (SFRs) and obtained radio observations of these with the Australia Telescope Compact Array and the Karl Jansky Very Large Array. Despite intentionally selecting GRB hosts with expected high SFRs, we do not find any star-formation-related radio emission in any of our targets. Our upper limit for GRB 100621A implies that the earlier reported radio detection was due to afterglow emission. We do detect radio emission from the position of GRB 020819B, but argue that it is in large parts, if not all, due to afterglow contamination. Half of our sample has radio-derived SFR limits which are only a factor 2--3 above the optically measured SFRs. This supports other recent studies that the majority of star formation in GRB hosts is not obscured by dust.
  • We discuss current efforts behind the curation of observing proposals, archive bibliographies, and data links in the NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS). The primary data in the ADS is the bibliographic content from scholarly articles in Astronomy and Physics, which ADS aggregates from publishers, arXiv and conference proceeding sites. This core bibliographic information is then further enriched by ADS via the generation of citations and usage data, and through the aggregation of external resources from astronomy data archives and libraries. Important sources of such additional information are the metadata describing observing proposals and high level data products, which, once ingested in ADS, become easily discoverable and citeable by the science community. Bibliographic studies have shown that the integration of links between data archives and the ADS provides greater visibility to data products and increased citations to the literature associated with them.
  • A new class of ultra-long duration (>10,000 s) gamma-ray bursts has recently been suggested. They may originate in the explosion of stars with much larger radii than normal long gamma-ray bursts or in the tidal disruptions of a star. No clear supernova had yet been associated with an ultra-long gamma-ray burst. Here we report that a supernova (2011kl) was associated with the ultra-long duration burst 111209A, at z=0.677. This supernova is more than 3 times more luminous than type Ic supernovae associated with long gamma-ray bursts, and its spectrum is distinctly different. The continuum slope resembles those of super-luminous supernovae, but extends farther down into the rest-frame ultra-violet implying a low metal content. The light curve evolves much more rapidly than super-luminous supernovae. The combination of high luminosity and low metal-line opacity cannot be reconciled with typical type Ic supernovae, but can be reproduced by a model where extra energy is injected by a strongly magnetized neutron star (a magnetar), which has also been proposed as the explanation for super-luminous supernovae.
  • We present the first uniform treatment of long duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxy detections and upper limits over the redshift range 3<z<5, a key epoch for observational and theoretical efforts to understand the processes, environments, and consequences of early cosmic star formation. We contribute deep imaging observations of 13 GRB positions yielding the discovery of eight new host galaxies. We use this dataset in tandem with previously published observations of 31 further GRB positions to estimate or constrain the host galaxy rest-frame ultraviolet (UV; 1600 A) absolute magnitudes M_UV. We then use the combined set of 44 M_UV estimates and limits to construct the M_UV luminosity function (LF) for GRB host galaxies over 3<z<5 and compare it to expectations from Lyman break galaxy (LBG) photometric surveys with the Hubble Space Telescope. Adopting standard prescriptions for the luminosity dependence of galaxy dust obscuration (and hence, total star formation rate), we find that our LF is compatible with LBG observations over a factor of 600x in host luminosity, from M_UV = -22.5 mag to >-15.6 mag, and with extrapolations of the assumed Schechter-type LF well beyond this range. We review proposed astrophysical and observational biases for our sample, and find they are for the most part minimal. We therefore conclude, as the simplest interpretation of our results, that GRBs successfully trace UV metrics of cosmic star formation over the range 3<z<5. Our findings suggest GRBs are providing an accurate picture of star formation processes from z ~3 out to the highest redshifts.
  • The ADS platform is undergoing the biggest rewrite of its 20-year history. While several components have been added to its architecture over the past couple of years, this talk will concentrate on the underpinnings of ADS's search layer and its API. To illustrate the design of the components in the new system, we will show how the new ADS user interface is built exclusively on top of the API using RESTful web services. Taking one step further, we will discuss how we plan to expose the treasure trove of information hosted by ADS (10 million records and fulltext for much of the Astronomy and Physics refereed literature) to partners interested in using this API. This will provide you (and your intelligent applications) with access to ADS's underlying data to enable the extraction of new knowledge and the ingestion of these results back into the ADS. Using this framework, researchers could run controlled experiments with content extraction, machine learning, natural language processing, etc. In this talk, we will discuss what is already implemented, what will be available soon, and where we are going next.
  • We have obtained initial spectroscopic observations and additional photometry of the newly discovered Pb=94min gamma-ray black-widow pulsar PSR J1311-3430. The Keck spectra show a He-dominated, nearly H-free photosphere and a large radial-velocity amplitude of 609.5+/-7.5km/s. Simultaneous seven-color GROND photometry further probes the heating of this companion, and shows the presence of a flaring infrared excess. We have modeled the quiescent light curve, constraining the orbital inclination and masses. Simple heated light-curve fits give M_NS=2.7Msun, but show systematic light-curve differences. Adding extra components allows a larger mass range to be fit, but all viable solutions have M_NS>2.1Msun. If confirmed, such a large M_NS substantially constrains the equation of state of matter at supernuclear densities.