• Inspired by recent successes using single-stranded DNA tiles to produce complex structures, we develop a two-step coarse-graining approach that uses detailed thermodynamic calculations with oxDNA, a nucleotide-based model of DNA, to parametrize a coarser kinetic model that can reach the time and length scales needed to study the assembly mechanisms of these structures. We test the model by performing a detailed study of the assembly pathways for a two-dimensional target structure made up of 334 unique strands each of which are 42 nucleotides long. Without adjustable parameters, the model reproduces a critical temperature for the formation of the assembly that is close to the temperature at which assembly first occurs in experiments. Furthermore, the model allows us to investigate in detail the nucleation barriers and the distribution of critical nucleus shapes for the assembly of a single target structure. The assembly intermediates are compact and highly connected (although not maximally so) and classical nucleation theory provides a good fit to the height and shape of the nucleation barrier at temperatures close to where assembly first occurs.
  • Global geometry optimization and time-dependent density functional theory calculations have been used to study the structural evolution and optical properties of (AgAu)n (n=2-6) nanoalloys both as individual clusters and as clusters stabilized with the fragments of DNA of different size. We show that alloying can be used to control and tune the level of interaction between the metal atoms of the cluster and the organic fragments of the DNA ligands. For instance, gold and silver atoms are shown to exhibit synergistic effects in the process of charge transfer from the nucleobase to the cluster, with the silver atoms directly connected to the nitrogen atoms of cytosine increasing their positive partial charge, while their more electronegative neighbouring gold atoms host the excess negative charge. This allows the geometrical structures and optical absorption spectra of small bimetallic clusters to retain many of their main features upon aggregation with relatively large DNA fragments, such as a cytosine-based 9-nucleotide hairpin loop, which suggests a potential synthetic route to such hybrid metal-organic compounds, and opens up the possibility of bringing the unique tunable properties of bimetallic nanoalloys to biological applications.
  • We use Monte Carlo simulations and free-energy techniques to show that binary solutions of penta- and hexavalent two-dimensional patchy particles can form thermodynamically stable quasicrystals even at very narrow patch widths, provided their patch interactions are chosen in an appropriate way. Such patchy particles can be thought of as a coarse-grained representation of DNA multi-arm `star' motifs, which can be chosen to bond with one another very specifically by tuning the DNA sequences of the protruding arms. We explore several possible design strategies and conclude that DNA star tiles that are designed to interact with one another in a specific but not overly constrained way could potentially be used to construct soft quasicrystals in experiment. We verify that such star tiles can form stable dodecagonal motifs using oxDNA, a realistic coarse-grained model of DNA.
  • We study the behaviour of double-stranded RNA under twist and tension using oxRNA, a recently developed coarse-grained model of RNA. Introducing explicit salt-dependence into the model allows us to directly compare our results to data from recent single-molecule experiments. The model reproduces extension curves as a function of twist and stretching force, including the buckling transition and the behaviour of plectoneme structures. For negative supercoiling, we predict denaturation bubble formation in plectoneme end-loops, suggesting preferential plectoneme localisation in weak base sequences. OxRNA exhibits a positive twist-stretch coupling constant, in agreement with recent experimental observations.
  • We introduce an extended version of oxDNA, a coarse-grained model of DNA designed to capture the thermodynamic, structural and mechanical properties of single- and double-stranded DNA. By including explicit major and minor grooves, and by slightly modifying the coaxial stacking and backbone-backbone interactions, we improve the ability of the model to treat large (kilobase-pair) structures such as DNA origami which are sensitive to these geometric features. Further, we extend the model, which was previously parameterised to just one salt concentration ([Na$^+$]=0.5M), so that it can be used for a range of salt concentrations including those corresponding to physiological conditions. Finally, we use new experimental data to parameterise the oxDNA potential so that consecutive adenine bases stack with a different strength to consecutive thymine bases, a feature which allows a more accurate treatment of systems where the flexibility of single-stranded regions is important. We illustrate the new possibilities opened up by the updated model, oxDNA2, by presenting results from simulations of the structure of large DNA objects and by using the model to investigate some salt-dependent properties of DNA.
  • Density functional theory based global geometry optimization has been used to demonstrate the crucial influence of the geometry of the catalytic cluster on the energy barriers for the CO oxidation reaction over Pd-based bimetallic nanoalloys. We show that dramatic geometry change between the reaction intermediates can lead to very high energy barriers and thus be prohibitive for the whole process. This introduces challenges for both the design of new catalysts, and theoretical methods employed. On the theory side, a careful choice of geometric configurations of all reaction intermediates is crucial for an adequate description of a possible reaction path. From the point of view of the catalyst design, the cluster geometry can be controlled by adjusting the level of interaction between the cluster and the dopant metal, as well as between the adsorbate molecules and the catalyst cluster by mixing different metals in a single nanoalloy particle. We show that substitution of a Pd atom in the Pd$_{5}$ cluster with a single Ag atom to form Pd$_{4}$Ag$_{1}$ leads to a potential improvement of the catalytic properties of the cluster for the CO oxidation reaction. On the other hand, a single Au atom does not enhance the properties of the catalyst, which is attributed to a weaker hybridization between the cluster's constituent metals and the adsorbate molecules. Such flexibility of properties of bimetallic nanoalloy clusters illustrates the possibility of fine-tuning, which might be used for design of novel efficient catalytic materials.
  • The rupture of double-stranded DNA under stress is a key process in biophysics and nanotechnology. In this article we consider the shear-induced rupture of short DNA duplexes, a system that has been given new importance by recently designed force sensors and nanotechnological devices. We argue that rupture must be understood as an activated process, where the duplex state is metastable and the strands will separate in a finite time that depends on the duplex length and the force applied. Thus, the critical shearing force required to rupture a duplex within a given experiment depends strongly on the time scale of observation. We use simple models of DNA to demonstrate that this approach naturally captures the experimentally observed dependence of the critical force on duplex length for a given observation time. In particular, the critical force is zero for the shortest duplexes, before rising sharply and then plateauing in the long length limit. The prevailing approach, based on identifying when the presence of each additional base pair within the duplex is thermodynamically unfavorable rather than allowing for metastability, does not predict a time-scale-dependent critical force and does not naturally incorporate a critical force of zero for the shortest duplexes. Additionally, motivated by a recently proposed force sensor, we investigate application of stress to a duplex in a mixed mode that interpolates between shearing and unzipping. As with pure shearing, the critical force depends on the time scale of observation; at a fixed time scale and duplex length, the critical force exhibits a sigmoidal dependence on the fraction of the duplex that is subject to shearing.
  • Advances in DNA nanotechnology have stimulated the search for simple motifs that can be used to control the properties of DNA nanostructures. One such motif, which has been used extensively in structures such as polyhedral cages, two-dimensional arrays, and ribbons, is a bulged duplex, that is two helical segments that connect at a bulge loop. We use a coarse-grained model of DNA to characterize such bulged duplexes. We find that this motif can adopt structures belonging to two main classes: one where the stacking of the helices at the center of the system is preserved, the geometry is roughly straight and the bulge is on one side of the duplex, and the other where the stacking at the center is broken, thus allowing this junction to act as a hinge and increasing flexibility. Small loops favor states where stacking at the center of the duplex is preserved, with loop bases either flipped out or incorporated into the duplex. Duplexes with longer loops show more of a tendency to unstack at the bulge and adopt an open structure. The unstacking probability, however, is highest for loops of intermediate lengths, when the rigidity of single-stranded DNA is significant and the loop resists compression. The properties of this basic structural motif clearly correlate with the structural behavior of certain nano-scale objects, where the enhanced flexibility associated with larger bulges has been used to tune the self-assembly product as well as the detailed geometry of the resulting nanostructures.
  • We study the thermodynamics and kinetics of an RNA toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction with a recently developed coarse-grained model of RNA. Strand displacement, during which a single strand displaces a different strand previously bound to a complementary substrate strand, is an essential mechanism in active nucleic acid nanotechnology and has also been hypothesized to occur in vivo. We study the rate of displacement reactions as a function of the length of the toehold and temperature and make two experimentally testable predictions: that the displacement is faster if the toehold is placed at the 5' end of the substrate and that the displacement slows down with increasing temperature for longer toeholds.
  • We study the dynamics of DNA hairpin formation using oxDNA, a nucleotide-level coarse-grained model of DNA. In particular, we explore the effects of the loop stacking interactions and non-native base pairing on the hairpin closing times. We find a non-monotonic variation of the hairpin closing time with temperature, in agreement with the experimental work of Wallace et al. [Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 2001, 98, 5584-5589]. The hairpin closing process involves the formation of an initial nucleus of one or two bonds between the stems followed by a rapid zippering of the stem. At high temperatures, typically above the hairpin melting temperature, an effective negative activation enthalpy is observed because the nucleus has a lower enthalpy than the open state. By contrast, at low temperatures, the activation enthalpy becomes positive mainly due to the increasing energetic cost of bending a loop that becomes increasingly highly stacked as the temperature decreases. We show that stacking must be very strong to induce this experimentally observed behavior, and that the existence of just a few weak stacking points along the loop can substantially suppress it. Non-native base pairs are observed to have only a small effect, slightly accelerating hairpin formation.
  • Molecular dynamics simulations and density functional theory calculations have been used to demonstrate the possibility of preserving high spin states of the magnetic cores within Ni-based core-shell bimetallic nanoalloys over a wide range of temperatures. We show that, unlike the case of Ni-Al clusters, Ni-Ag clusters preserve high spin states (up to 8 $\mu_{\mathrm{B}}$ in case of Ni$_{13}$Ag$_{32}$ cluster) due to small hybridization between the electronic levels of two species. Intriguingly, such clusters are also able to maintain geometrical and electronic integrity of their cores at temperatures up to 1000 K (e.g. for Ni$_{7}$Ag$_{27}$ cluster). Furthermore, we also show the possibility of creating ordered arrays of such magnetic clusters on a suitable support by soft-landing pre-formed clusters on the surface, without introducing much disturbance in geometrical and electronic structure of the cluster. We illustrate this approach with the example of Ni$_{13}$Ag$_{38}$ clusters adsorbed on the Si(111)-(7$\times$7) surface, which, having two distinctive halves to the unit cell, acts as a selective template for cluster deposition.
  • The effect of secondary structure on DNA duplex formation is poorly understood. We use a coarse-grained model of DNA to show that specific 3- and 4-base pair hairpins reduce hybridization rates by factors of 2 and 10 respectively, in good agreement with experiment. By contrast, melting rates are accelerated by factors of ~100 and ~2000. This surprisingly large speed-up occurs because hairpins form during the melting process, stabilizing partially melted states, and facilitating dissociation. These results may help guide the design of DNA devices that use hairpins to modulate hybridization and dissociation pathways and rates.
  • Despite its importance in atmospheric science, much remains unknown about the microscopic mechanism of heterogeneous ice nucleation. In this work, we perform hybrid Monte Carlo simulations of the heterogeneous nucleation of ice on a range of generic surfaces, both flat and structured, in order to probe the underlying factors affecting the nucleation process. The structured surfaces we study comprise one basal plane bilayer of ice with varying lattice parameters and interaction strengths. We show that what determines the propensity for nucleation is not just the surface attraction, but also the orientational ordering imposed on liquid water near a surface. In particular, varying the ratio of the surface's attraction and orientational ordering can change the mechanism by which nucleation occurs: ice can nucleate on the structured surface even when the orientational ordering imposed by the surface is weak, as the water molecules that interact strongly with the surface are themselves a good template for further growth. We also show that lattice matching is important for heterogeneous nucleation on the structured surface we study. We rationalise these brute-force simulation results by explicitly calculating the interfacial free energies of ice and liquid water in contact with the nucleating surface and their variation with surface interaction parameters.
  • Biological information is not only stored in the digital chemical sequence of double helical DNA, but is also encoded in the mechanical properties of the DNA strands, which can influence biochemical processes involving its readout. For example, loop formation in the Lac operon can regulate the expression of key genes, and DNA supercoiling is closely correlated to rhythmic circardian gene expression in cyanobacteria. Supercoiling is also important for large scale organisation of the genome in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. DNA can respond to torsional stress by writhing to form looped structures called plectonemes, thus transferring energy stored as twist into energy stored in bending. Denaturation bubbles can also relax torsional stress, with the enthalpic cost of breaking bonds being compensated by their ability to absorb undertwist. Here we predict a novel regime where bubbles form at the tips of plectonemes, and study its properties using coarse-grained simulations. These tip bubbles can occur for both positive and negative supercoiling and greatly reduce plectoneme diffusion by a pinning mechanism. They can cause plectonemes to preferentially localise to AT rich regions, because bubbles more easily form there. The tip-bubble regime occurs for supercoiling densities and forces that are typically encountered for DNA in vivo, and may be exploited for biological control of genomic processes.
  • We present a new, nucleotide-level model for RNA, oxRNA, based on the coarse-graining methodology recently developed for the oxDNA model of DNA. The model is designed to reproduce structural, mechanical and thermodynamic properties of RNA, and the coarse-graining level aims to retain the relevant physics for RNA hybridization and the structure of single- and double-stranded RNA. In order to explore its strengths and weaknesses, we test the model in a range of nanotechnological and biological settings. Applications explored include the folding thermodynamics of a pseudoknot, the formation of a kissing loop complex, the structure of a hexagonal RNA nanoring, and the unzipping of a hairpin motif. We argue that the model can be used for efficient simulations of the structure of systems with thousands of base pairs, and for the assembly of systems of up to hundreds of base pairs. The source code implementing the model is released for public use.
  • We present a partial free energy profile for the homogeneous nucleation of ice using an all-atom model of water at low supercooling, at which ice growth dynamics are reasonably accessible to simulation. We demonstrate that the free energy profile is well described by classical nucleation theory, and that the nucleation barrier is entropic in origin. We also estimate to first order the temperature dependence of the interfacial free energy.
  • We introduce an approach to computing the free energy of quasicrystals, which we use to calculate phase diagrams for systems of two-dimensional patchy particles with five regularly arranged patches that have previously been shown to form dodecagonal quasicrystals. We find that the quasicrystal is a thermodynamically stable phase for a wide range of conditions and remains a robust feature of the system as the potential's parameters are varied. We also demonstrate that the quasicrystal is entropically stabilised over its crystalline approximants.
  • While the thermodynamics of DNA hybridization is well understood, much less is known about the kinetics of this classic system. Filling this gap in our understanding has new urgency because DNA nanotechnology often depends critically on binding rates. Here we use a coarse-grained model to explore the hybridization kinetics of DNA oligomers, finding that strand association proceeds through a complex set of intermediate states. Successful binding events start with the formation of a few metastable base-pairing interactions, followed by zippering of the remaining bonds. However, despite reasonably strong interstrand interactions, initial contacts frequently fail to lead to zippering because the typical configurations in which they form differ from typical states of similar enthalpy in the double-stranded equilibrium ensemble. Therefore, if the association process is analyzed on the base-pair (secondary structure) level, it shows non-Markovian behavior. Initial contacts must be stabilized by two or three base pairs before full zippering is likely, resulting in negative effective activation enthalpies. Non-Arrhenius behavior is observed as the number of base pairs in the effective transition state increases with temperature. In addition, we find that alternative pathways involving misbonds can increase association rates. For repetitive sequences, misaligned duplexes frequently rearrange to form fully paired duplexes by two distinct processes which we label `pseudoknot' and `inchworm' internal displacement. We show how the above processes can explain why experimentally observed association rates of GC-rich oligomers are higher than rates of AT-rich equivalents. More generally, we argue that association rates can be modulated by sequence choice.
  • We use a recently developed coarse-grained model to simulate the overstretching of duplex DNA. Overstretching at 23C occurs at 74 pN in the model, about 6-7 pN higher than the experimental value at equivalent salt conditions. Furthermore, the model reproduces the temperature dependence of the overstretching force well. The mechanism of overstretching is always force-induced melting by unpeeling from the free ends. That we never see S-DNA (overstretched duplex DNA), even though there is clear experimental evidence for this mode of overstretching under certain conditions, suggests that S-DNA is not simply an unstacked but hydrogen-bonded duplex, but instead probably has a more exotic structure.
  • We apply a recently-developed coarse-grained model of DNA, designed to capture the basic physics of nanotechnological DNA systems, to the study of a `burnt-bridges' DNA motor consisting of a single-stranded cargo that steps processively along a track of single-stranded stators. We demonstrate that the model is able to simulate such a system, and investigate the sensitivity of the stepping process to the spatial separation of stators, finding that an increased distance can suppress successful steps due to the build up of unfavourable tension. The mechanism of suppression suggests that varying the distance between stators could be used as a method for improving signal-to-noise ratios for motors that are required to make a decision at a junction of stators.
  • We present a local order parameter based on the standard Steinhardt-Ten Wolde approach that is capable both of tracking and of driving homogeneous ice nucleation in simulations of all-atom models of water. We demonstrate that it is capable of forcing the growth of ice nuclei in supercooled liquid water simulated using the TIP4P/2005 model using overbiassed umbrella sampling Monte Carlo simulations. However, even with such an order parameter, the dynamics of ice growth in deeply supercooled liquid water in all-atom models of water are shown to be very slow, and so the computation of free energy landscapes and nucleation rates remains extremely challenging.
  • Inverted repeat (IR) sequences in DNA can form non-canonical cruciform structures to relieve torsional stress. We use Monte Carlo simulations of a recently developed coarse-grained model of DNA to demonstrate that the nucleation of a cruciform can proceed through a cooperative mechanism. Firstly, a twist-induced denaturation bubble must diffuse so that its midpoint is near the centre of symmetry of the IR sequence. Secondly, bubble fluctuations must be large enough to allow one of the arms to form a small number of hairpin bonds. Once the first arm is partially formed, the second arm can rapidly grow to a similar size. Because bubbles can twist back on themselves, they need considerably fewer bases to resolve torsional stress than the final cruciform state does. The initially stabilised cruciform therefore continues to grow, which typically proceeds synchronously, reminiscent of the S-type mechanism of cruciform formation. By using umbrella sampling techniques we calculate, for different temperatures and superhelical densities, the free energy as a function of the number of bonds in each cruciform along the correlated but non-synchronous nucleation pathways we observed in direct simulations.
  • We introduce a sequence-dependent parametrization for a coarse-grained DNA model [T. E. Ouldridge, A. A. Louis, and J. P. K. Doye, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 085101 (2011)] originally designed to reproduce the properties of DNA molecules with average sequences. The new parametrization introduces sequence-dependent stacking and base-pairing interaction strengths chosen to reproduce the melting temperatures of short duplexes. By developing a histogram reweighting technique, we are able to fit our parameters to the melting temperatures of thousands of sequences. To demonstrate the flexibility of the model, we study the effects of sequence on: (a) the heterogeneous stacking transition of single strands, (b) the tendency of a duplex to fray at its melting point, (c) the effects of stacking strength in the loop on the melting temperature of hairpins, (d) the force-extension properties of single strands and (e) the structure of a kissing-loop complex. Where possible we compare our results with experimental data and find a good agreement. A simulation code called oxDNA, implementing our model, is available as free software.
  • We use a recently developed coarse-grained model for DNA to study kissing complexes formed by hybridization of complementary hairpin loops. The binding of the loops is topologically constrained because their linking number must remain constant. By studying systems with linking numbers -1, 0 or 1 we show that the average number of interstrand base pairs is larger when the topology is more favourable for the right-handed wrapping of strands around each other. The thermodynamic stability of the kissing complex also decreases when the linking number changes from -1 to 0 to 1. The structures of the kissing complexes typically involve two intermolecular helices that coaxially stack with the hairpin stems at a parallel four-way junction.
  • We simulate the homogeneous nucleation of ice from supercooled liquid water at 220 K in the isobaric-isothermal ensemble using the MW monatomic water potential. Monte Carlo simulations using umbrella sampling are performed in order to determine the nucleation free energy barrier. We find the Gibbs energy profile to be relatively consistent with that predicted by classical nucleation theory; the free energy barrier to nucleation was determined to be ~18 kT and the critical nucleus comprised ~85 ice particles. Growth from the supercooled liquid gives clusters that are predominantly cubic, whilst starting with a pre-formed subcritical nucleus of cubic or hexagonal ice results in the growth of predominantly that phase of ice only.