• Observations suggest that there is a significant fraction of O-stars in the field of the Milky Way that appear to have formed in isolation or in low mass clusters ($<$100 $M_\odot$). The existence of these high-mass stars that apparently formed in the field challenges the generally accepted paradigm, which requires star formation to occur in clustered environments. In order to understand the physical conditions for the formation of these stars, it is necessary to observe isolated high-mass stars while they are still forming. With the $Hubble$ $Space$ $Telescope$, we observe the seven most isolated massive ($>$8 $M_\odot$) young stellar objects (MYSOs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The observations show that while these MYSOs are remote from other MYSOs, OB associations, and even from known giant molecular clouds, they are actually not isolated at all. Imaging reveals $\sim$100 to several hundred pre--main-sequence (PMS) stars in the vicinity of each MYSO. These previously undetected PMS stars form prominent compact clusters around the MYSOs, and in most cases they are also distributed sparsely across the observed regions. Contrary to what previous high-mass field star studies show, these observations suggest that high-mass stars may not be able to form in clusters with masses less than 100 $M_\odot$. If these MYSOs are indeed the best candidates for isolated high-mass star formation, then the lack of isolation is at odds with random sampling of the IMF. Moreover, while isolated MYSOs may not exist, we find evidence that isolated clusters containing O-stars can exist, which in itself is rare.
  • The Magellanic Bridge is the nearest low-metallicity, tidally stripped environment, offering a unique high-resolution view of physical conditions in merging and forming galaxies. In this paper we present analysis of candidate massive young stellar objects (YSOs), i.e., {\it in situ, current} massive star formation (MSF) in the Bridge using {\it Spitzer} mid-IR and complementary optical and near-IR photometry. While we definitely find YSOs in the Bridge, the most massive are $\sim10 M_\odot$, $\ll45 M_\odot$ found in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The intensity of MSF in the Bridge also appears decreasing, as the most massive YSOs are less massive than those formed in the past. To investigate environmental effects on MSF, we have compared properties of massive YSOs in the Bridge to those in the LMC. First, YSOs in the Bridge are apparently less embedded than in the LMC: 81% of Bridge YSOs show optical counterparts, compared to only 56% of LMC sources with the same range of mass, circumstellar dust mass, and line-of-sight extinction. Circumstellar envelopes are evidently more porous or clumpy in the Bridge's low-metallicity environment. Second, we have used whole samples of YSOs in the LMC and the Bridge to estimate the probability of finding YSOs at a given \hi\ column density, N(HI). We found that the LMC has $\sim3\times$ higher probability than the Bridge for N(HI) $>10\times10^{20}$ cm$^{-2}$, but the trend reverses at lower N(HI). Investigating whether this lower efficiency relative to HI is due to less efficient molecular cloud formation, or less efficient cloud collapse, or both, will require sensitive molecular gas observations.
  • We report the results of a high spatial (parsec) resolution HCO+ (J = 1-0) and HCN (J = 1-0) emission survey toward the giant molecular clouds of the star formation regions N105, N113, N159, and N44 in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The HCO+ and HCN observations at 89.2 and 88.6 GHz, respectively, were conducted in the compact configuration of the Australia Telescope Compact Array. The emission is imaged into individual clumps with masses between 10^2 and 10^4 solar masses and radii of <1 pc to ~2 pc. Many of the clumps are coincident with indicators of current massive star formation, indicating that many of the clumps are associated with deeply-embedded forming stars and star clusters. We find that massive YSO-bearing clumps tend to be larger (>1 pc), more massive (M > 10^3 solar masses), and have higher surface densities (~1 g cm^-2), while clumps without signs of star formation are smaller (<1 pc), less massive (M < 10^3 solar masses), and have lower surface densities (~0.1 g cm^-2). The dearth of massive (M >10^3 solar masses) clumps not bearing massive YSOs suggests the onset of star formation occurs rapidly once the clump has attained physical properties favorable to massive star formation. Using a large sample of LMC massive YSO mid-IR spectra, we estimate that ~2/3 of the massive YSOs for which there are Spitzer mid-IR spectra are no longer located in molecular clumps; we estimate that these young stars/clusters have destroyed their natal clumps on a time scale of at least 3 x 10^{5}$ yrs.
  • The HII complex N159 in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is used to study massive star formation in different environments, as it contains three giant molecular clouds (GMCs) that have similar sizes and masses but exhibit different intensities of star formation. We identify candidate massive young stellar objects (YSOs) using infrared photometry, and model their SEDs to constrain mass and evolutionary state. Good fits are obtained for less evolved Type I, I/II, and II sources. Our analysis suggests that there are massive embedded YSOs in N159B, a maser source, and several ultracompact HII regions. Massive O-type YSOs are found in GMCs N159-E and N159-W, which are associated with ionized gas, i.e., where massive stars formed a few Myr ago. The third GMC, N159-S, has neither O-type YSOs nor evidence of previous massive star formation. This correlation between current and antecedent formation of massive stars suggests that energy feedback is relevant. We present evidence that N159-W is forming YSOs spontaneously, while collapse in N159-E may be triggered. Finally, we compare star formation rates determined from YSO counts with those from integrated H-alpha and 24 micron luminosities and expected from gas surface densities. Detailed dissection of extragalactic GMCs like the one presented here is key to revealing the physics underlying commonly used star formation scaling laws.
  • We present and categorize Spitzer IRS spectra of 294 objects in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) to create the largest and most complete catalog of massive young stellar object (YSO) spectra in the LMC. Target sources were identified from infrared photometry and multi-wavelength images indicative of young, massive stars highly enshrouded in their natal gas and dust clouds. Our sample primarily consists of 277 objects we identify as having spectral features indicative of embedded YSOs. The remaining sources are comprised of 7 C-rich evolved sources, 8 sources dominated by broad silicate emission, and 1 source with multiple broad emission features. Those with YSO-like spectra show a range of spectral features including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission, deep silicate absorption, fine-structure lines, and ice absorption features. Based upon the relative strengths of these features, we have classified the YSO candidates into several distinct categories using the widely-used statistical procedure known as principal component analysis. We propose that these categories represent a spectrum of evolutionary stages during massive YSO formation. We conclude that massive pre-main sequence stars spend a majority of their massive, embedded lives emitting in the UV. Half of the sources in our study have features typical of compact HII regions, suggesting that massive YSOs can create a detectable compact HII region half-way through the formation time present in our sample. This study also provides a check on commonly used source-selection procedures including the use of photometry to identify YSOs. We determine a high success rate (>95%) of identifying objects with YSO-like spectra can be achieved through careful use of infrared CMDs, SEDs, and image inspections.
  • We present Spitzer IRAC images that indicate the presence of cavities cut into the dense outer envelope surrounding very young pre-main sequence stars. These young stellar objects (YSOs) characterized by an outflow represent the earliest stages of star formation. Mid-infrared photons thermally created by the central protostar/disk are scattered by dust particles within the outflow cavity itself into the line of sight. We observed this scattered light from 27 nearby, cavity-resolved YSOs, and quantified the shape of the outflow cavities. Using the grid models of Robitaille et al. (2006), we matched model spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to the observed SEDs of the 27 cataloged YSOs using photometry from IRAC, MIPS, and IRAS. This allows for the estimation of geometric and physical properties such as inclination angle, cavity density, and accretion rate. By using the relative parameter estimates determined by the models, we are able to deduce an evolutionary picture for outflows. Our work supports the concept that cavities widen with time, beginning as a thin jet-like outflow that widens to reveal the central protostar and disk until the protostellar envelope is completely dispersed by outflow and accretion.