• The origin of ultracompact dwarfs (UCDs), a class of compact stellar systems discovered two decades ago, still remains a matter of debate. Recent discoveries of central supermassive black holes in UCDs likely inherited from their massive progenitor galaxies provide support for the tidal stripping hypothesis. At the same time, on statistical grounds, some massive UCDs might be representatives of the high luminosity tail of the globular cluster luminosity function. Here we present a detection of a $3.3^{+1.4}_{-1.2}\times10^6\,M_{\odot}$ black hole ($1\sigma$ uncertainty) in the centre of the UCD3 galaxy in the Fornax cluster, that corresponds to 4 per cent of its stellar mass. We performed isotropic Jeans dynamical modelling of UCD3 using internal kinematics derived from adaptive optics assisted observations with the SINFONI spectrograph and seeing limited data collected with the FLAMES spectrograph at the ESO VLT. We rule out the zero black hole mass at the $3\sigma$ confidence level when adopting a mass-to-light ratio inferred from stellar populations. This is the fourth supermassive black hole found in a UCD and the first one in the Fornax cluster. Similarly to other known UCDs that harbour black holes, UCD3 hosts metal rich stars enhanced in $\alpha$-elements that supports the tidal stripping of a massive progenitor as its likely formation scenario. We estimate that up to 80 per cent of luminous UCDs in galaxy clusters host central black holes. This fraction should be lower for UCDs in groups, because their progenitors are more likely to be dwarf galaxies, which do not tend to host central black holes.
  • We examine the internal properties of the most massive ultracompact dwarf galaxy (UCD), M59-UCD3, by combining adaptive optics assisted near-IR integral field spectroscopy from Gemini/NIFS, and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging. We use the multi-band HST imaging to create a mass model that suggests and accounts for the presence of multiple stellar populations and structural components. We combine these mass models with kinematics measurements from Gemini/NIFS to find a best-fit stellar mass-to-light ratio ($M/L$) and black hole (BH) mass using Jeans Anisotropic Models (JAM), axisymmetric Schwarzschild models, and triaxial Schwarzschild models. The best fit parameters in the JAM and axisymmetric Schwarzschild models have black holes between 2.5 and 5.9 million solar masses. The triaxial Schwarzschild models point toward a similar BH mass, but show a minimum $\chi^2$ at a BH mass of $\sim 0$. Models with a BH in all three techniques provide better fits to the central $V_{rms}$ profiles, and thus we estimate the BH mass to be $4.2^{+2.1}_{-1.7} \times 10^{6}$ M$_\odot$ (estimated 1$\sigma$ uncertainties). We also present deep radio imaging of M59-UCD3 and two other UCDs in Virgo with dynamical BH mass measurements, and compare these to X-ray measurements to check for consistency with the fundamental plane of BH accretion. We detect faint radio emission in M59cO, but find only upper limits for M60-UCD1 and M59-UCD3 despite X-ray detections in both these sources. The BH mass and nuclear light profile of M59-UCD3 suggests it is the tidally stripped remnant of a $\sim$10$^{9-10}$ M$_\odot$ galaxy.
  • The recent discovery of massive black holes (BHs) in the centers of high-mass ultra compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) suggests that at least some are the stripped nuclear star clusters of dwarf galaxies. We present the first study that investigates whether such massive BHs, and therefore stripped nuclei, also exist in low-mass ($M<10^{7}M_{\odot}$) UCDs. We constrain the BH masses of two UCDs located in Centaurus A (UCD320 and UCD330) using Jeans modeling of the resolved stellar kinematics from adaptive optics VLT/SINFONI data. No massive BHs are found in either UCD. We find a $3\,\sigma$ upper limit on the central BH mass in UCD\,330 of $M_{\bullet}<1.0\times10^{5}M_{\odot}$, which corresponds to 1.7\% of the total mass. This excludes a high mass fraction BH and would only allow a low-mass BHs similar to those claimed to be detected in Local Group GCs. For UCD320, poorer data quality results in a less constraining $3\,\sigma$ upper limit of $M_{\bullet}<1\times10^{6}M_{\odot}$, which is equal to 37.7\% of the total mass. The dynamical $M/L$ of UCD320 and UCD330 are not inflated compared to predictions from stellar population models. The non-detection of BHs in these low-mass UCDs is consistent with the idea that elevated dynamical $M/L$s do indicate the presence of a substantial BH. Despite not detecting massive BHs, these systems could still be stripped nuclei. The strong rotation ($v/\sigma$ of 0.3 to 0.4) in both UCDs and the two-component light profile in UCD330 support the idea that these UCDs may be stripped nuclei of low-mass galaxies where the BH occupation fraction is not yet known.
  • We use spatially resolved two-dimensional stellar velocity maps over a $107''\times 107''$ field of view to investigate the kinematic features of 90 early-type galaxies above stellar mass $10^{11.5}M_\odot$ in the MASSIVE survey. We measure the misalignment angle $\Psi$ between the kinematic and photometric axes and identify local features such as velocity twists and kinematically distinct components. We find 46% of the sample to be well aligned ($\Psi < 15^{\circ}$), 33% misaligned, and 21% without detectable rotation (non-rotators). Only 24% of the sample are fast rotators, the majority of which (91%) are aligned, whereas 57% of the slow rotators are misaligned with a nearly flat distribution of $\Psi$ from $15^{\circ}$ to $90^{\circ}$. We find that 11 galaxies have $\Psi \gtrsim 60^{\circ}$ and thus exhibit minor-axis rotation (or "prolate" rotation) in which the rotation is preferentially around the photometric major axis. We find kinematic misalignment to occur more frequently for higher stellar mass, lower galaxy spin, lower ellipticity, or denser galaxy environments. In terms of local kinematic features, 51% of the sample exhibit kinematic twists of larger than $20^{\circ}$, and 2 galaxies have kinematically distinct components. The frequency of misalignment and the broad distribution of $\Psi$ reported here suggest that the most massive early-type galaxies are likely to be at least mildly triaxial, and the formation processes resulting in kinematically misaligned slow rotators such as gas-poor mergers occur frequently in this mass range.
  • We measure the radial profiles of the stellar velocity dispersions, $\sigma(R)$, for 85 early-type galaxies (ETGs) in the MASSIVE survey, a volume-limited integral-field spectroscopic (IFS) galaxy survey targeting all northern-sky ETGs with absolute $K$-band magnitude $M_K < -25.3$ mag, or stellar mass $M_* > 4 \times 10^{11} M_\odot$, within 108 Mpc. Our wide-field 107" $\times$ 107" IFS data cover radii as large as 40 kpc, for which we quantify separately the inner ($<5$ kpc) and outer logarithmic slopes $\gamma_{\rm inner}$ and $\gamma_{\rm outer}$ of $\sigma(R)$. While $\gamma_{\rm inner}$ is mostly negative, of the 61 galaxies with sufficient radial coverage to determine $\gamma_{\rm outer}$ we find 33% to have rising outer dispersion profiles ($\gamma_{\rm outer} > 0.03$), 13% to be flat ($-0.03 < \gamma_{\rm outer} < 0.03$), and 54% to be falling. The fraction of galaxies with rising outer profiles increases with $M_*$ and in denser galaxy environment, with the 11 most massive galaxies in our sample all having flat or rising dispersion profiles. The strongest environmental correlation is with halo mass, but weaker correlations with large-scale density and local density also exist. The average $\gamma_{\rm outer}$ is similar for brightest group galaxies, satellites, and isolated galaxies in our sample. We find a clear positive correlation between the gradients of the outer dispersion profile and the gradients of the velocity kurtosis $h_4$. Altogether, our kinematic results suggest that the increasing fraction of rising dispersion profiles in the most massive ETGs are caused (at least in part) by variations in the total mass profiles rather than in the velocity anisotropy alone.
  • We analyse the environmental properties of 370 local early-type galaxies (ETGs) in the MASSIVE and ATLAS3D surveys, two complementary volume-limited integral-field spectroscopic (IFS) galaxy surveys spanning absolute $K$-band magnitude $-21.5 > M_K > -26.6$, or stellar mass $8 \times 10^{9} < M_* < 2 \times 10^{12} M_\odot$. We find these galaxies to reside in a diverse range of environments measured by four methods: group membership (whether a galaxy is a brightest group/cluster galaxy, satellite, or isolated), halo mass, large-scale mass density (measured over a few Mpc), and local mass density (measured within the $N$th neighbour). The spatially resolved IFS stellar kinematics provide robust measurements of the spin parameter $\lambda_e$ and enable us to examine the relationship among $\lambda_e$, $M_*$, and galaxy environment. We find a strong correlation between $\lambda_e$ and $M_*$, where the average $\lambda_e$ decreases from $\sim 0.4$ to below 0.1 with increasing mass, and the fraction of slow rotators $f_{\rm slow}$ increases from $\sim 10$% to 90%. We show for the first time that at fixed $M_*$, there are almost no trends between galaxy spin and environment; the apparent kinematic morphology-density relation for ETGs is therefore primarily driven by $M_*$ and is accounted for by the joint correlations between $M_*$ and spin, and between $M_*$ and environment. A possible exception is that the increased $f_{\rm slow}$ at high local density is slightly more than expected based only on these joint correlations. Our results suggest that the physical processes responsible for building up the present-day stellar masses of massive galaxies are also very efficient at reducing their spin, in any environment.
  • We present the detection of supermassive black holes (BHs) in two Virgo ultracompact dwarf galaxies (UCDs), VUCD3 and M59cO. We use adaptive optics assisted data from the Gemini/NIFS instrument to derive radial velocity dispersion profiles for both objects. Mass models for the two UCDs are created using multi-band Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging, including the modeling of mild color gradients seen in both objects. We then find a best-fit stellar mass-to-light ratio ($M/L$) and BH mass by combining the kinematic data and the deprojected stellar mass profile using Jeans Anisotropic Models (JAM). Assuming axisymmetric isotropic Jeans models, we detect BHs in both objects with masses of $4.4^{+2.5}_{-3.0} \times 10^6$ $M_{\odot}$ in VUCD3 and $5.8^{+2.5}_{-2.8} \times 10^6$ $M_{\odot}$ in M59cO (3$\sigma$ uncertainties). The BH mass is degenerate with the anisotropy parameter, $\beta_z$; for the data to be consistent with no BH requires $\beta_z = 0.4$ and $\beta_z = 0.6$ for VUCD3 and M59cO, respectively. Comparing these values with nuclear star clusters shows that while it is possible that these UCDs are highly radially anisotropic, it seems unlikely. These detections constitute the second and third UCDs known to host supermassive BHs. They both have a high fraction of their total mass in their BH; $\sim$13% for VUCD3 and $\sim$18% for M59cO. They also have low best-fit stellar $M/L$s, supporting the proposed scenario that most massive UCDs host high mass fraction BHs. The properties of the BHs and UCDs are consistent with both objects being the tidally stripped remnants of $\sim$10$^9$ M$_\odot$ galaxies.
  • Dedicated photometric and spectroscopic surveys have provided unambiguous evidence for a strong stellar mass-size evolution of galaxies within the last 10 Gyr. The likely progenitors of today's most massive galaxies are remarkably small, disky, passive and have already assembled much of their stellar mass at redshift z=2. An in-depth analysis of these objects, however, is currently not feasible due to the lack of high-quality, spatially-resolved photometric and spectroscopic data. In this paper, we present a sample of nearby compact elliptical galaxies (CEGs), which bear resemblance to the massive and quiescent galaxy population at earlier times. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and wide-field integral field unit (IFU) data have been obtained, and are used to constrain orbit-based dynamical models and stellar population synthesis (SPS) fits, to unravel their structural and dynamical properties. We first show that our galaxies are outliers in the present-day stellar mass-size relation. They are, however, consistent with the mass-size relation of compact, massive and quiescent galaxies at redshift z=2. The compact sizes of our nearby galaxies imply high central stellar mass surface densities, which are also in agreement with the massive galaxy population at higher redshift, hinting at strong dissipational processes during their formation. Corroborating evidence for a largely passive evolution within the last 10 Gyr is provided by their orbital distribution as well as their stellar populations, which are difficult to reconcile with a very active (major) merging history. This all supports that we can use nearby CEGs as local analogues of the high-redshift, massive and quiescent galaxy population, thus providing additional constraints for models of galaxy formation and evolution.
  • Mrk 1216 is a nearby, early-type galaxy with a small effective radius of 2.8 kpc and a large stellar velocity dispersion of 308 km/s for its K-band luminosity of 1.4x10^11 L_sun. Using integral-field spectroscopy assisted by adaptive optics from Gemini North, we measure spatially resolved stellar kinematics within ~450 pc of the galaxy nucleus. The galaxy exhibits regular rotation with velocities of \pm 180 km/s and a sharply peaked velocity dispersion profile that reaches 425 km/s at the center. We fit axisymmetric, orbit-based dynamical models to the combination of these high angular resolution kinematics, large-scale kinematics extending to roughly three effective radii, and Hubble Space Telescope imaging, resulting in a constraint of the mass of the central black hole in Mrk 1216. After exploring several possible sources of systematics that commonly affect stellar-dynamical black hole mass measurements, we find a black hole mass of (4.9\pm1.7)x10^9 M_sun and a H-band stellar mass-to-light ratio of 1.3\pm0.4 M_sun/L_sun (1-sigma uncertainties). Mrk 1216 is consistent with the local black hole mass - stellar velocity dispersion relation, but is a factor of ~5-10 larger than expectations from the black hole mass - bulge luminosity and black hole mass - bulge mass correlations when conservatively using the galaxy's total luminosity or stellar mass. This behavior is quite similar to the extensively studied compact galaxy NGC 1277. Resembling the z~2 quiescent galaxies, Mrk 1216 may be a passively evolved descendant, and perhaps reflects a previous era when galaxies contained over-massive black holes relative to their bulge luminosities/masses, and the growth of host galaxies had yet to catch up.
  • The Type~Ia supernova (SN~Ia) 2016coj in NGC 4125 (redshift $z=0.004523$) was discovered by the Lick Observatory Supernova Search 4.9 days after the fitted first-light time (FFLT; 11.1 days before $B$-band maximum). Our first detection (pre-discovery) is merely $0.6\pm0.5$ day after the FFLT, making SN 2016coj one of the earliest known detections of a SN Ia. A spectrum was taken only 3.7 hr after discovery (5.0 days after the FFLT) and classified as a normal SN Ia. We performed high-quality photometry, low- and high-resolution spectroscopy, and spectropolarimetry, finding that SN 2016coj is a spectroscopically normal SN Ia, but with a high velocity of \ion{Si}{2} $\lambda$6355 ($\sim 12,600$\,\kms\ around peak brightness). The \ion{Si}{2} $\lambda$6355 velocity evolution can be well fit by a broken-power-law function for up to a month after the FFLT. SN 2016coj has a normal peak luminosity ($M_B \approx -18.9 \pm 0.2$ mag), and it reaches a $B$-band maximum \about16.0~d after the FFLT. We estimate there to be low host-galaxy extinction based on the absence of Na~I~D absorption lines in our low- and high-resolution spectra. The spectropolarimetric data exhibit weak polarization in the continuum, but the \ion{Si}{2} line polarization is quite strong ($\sim 0.9\% \pm 0.1\%$) at peak brightness.
  • We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Cycle 3 observations of CO(2-1) emission from the circumnuclear disk in the E/S0 galaxy NGC 1332 at 0.044" resolution. The disk exhibits regular rotational kinematics and central high-velocity emission (+/-500 km/s) consistent with the presence of a compact central mass. We construct models for a thin, dynamically cold disk in the gravitational potential of the host galaxy and black hole, and fit the beam-smeared model line profiles directly to the ALMA data cube. Model fits successfully reproduce the disk kinematics out to r=200 pc. Fitting models just to spatial pixels within projected r=50 pc of the nucleus (two times larger than the black hole's gravitational radius of influence), we find M_BH=6.64(-0.63,+0.65)*10^8 solar masses. This observation demonstrates ALMA's powerful capability to determine the masses of supermassive black holes by resolving gas kinematics on small angular scales in galaxy nuclei.
  • The nearby lenticular galaxy NGC 1277 is thought to host one of the largest black holes known, however the black hole mass measurement is based on low spatial resolution spectroscopy. In this paper, we present Gemini Near-infrared Integral Field Spectrometer observations assisted by adaptive optics. We map out the galaxy's stellar kinematics within ~440 pc of the nucleus with an angular resolution that allows us to probe well within the region where the potential from the black hole dominates. We find that the stellar velocity dispersion rises dramatically, reaching ~550 km/s at the center. Through orbit-based, stellar-dynamical models we obtain a black hole mass of (4.9 \pm 1.6) x 10^9 Msun (1-sigma uncertainties). Although the black hole mass measurement is smaller by a factor of ~3 compared to previous claims based on large-scale kinematics, NGC 1277 does indeed contain one of the most massive black holes detected to date, and the black hole mass is an order of magnitude larger than expectations from the empirical relation between black hole mass and galaxy luminosity. Given the galaxy's similarities to the higher redshift (z~2) massive quiescent galaxies, NGC 1277 could be a relic, passively evolving since that period. A population of local analogs to the higher redshift quiescent galaxies that also contain over-massive black holes may suggest that black hole growth precedes that of the host galaxy.
  • We investigate the compact, early-type galaxy NGC 1281 with integral field unit observations to map the stellar LOSVD out to 5 effective radii and construct orbit-based dynamical models to constrain its dark and luminous matter content. Under the assumption of mass-follows-light, the H-band stellar mass-to-light ratio (M/L) is {\Upsilon} = 2.7(+-0.1) {\Upsilon}_{sun}, higher than expected from our stellar population synthesis fits with either a canonical Kroupa ({\Upsilon} = 1.3 {\Upsilon}_{sun}) or Salpeter ({\Upsilon} = 1.7 {\Upsilon}_{sun}) stellar initial mass function. Such models also cannot reproduce the details of the LOSVD. Models with a dark halo recover the kinematics well and indicate that NGC 1281 is dark matter dominated, making up ~ 90 per cent of the total enclosed mass within the kinematic bounds. Parameterised as a spherical NFW profile, the dark halo mass is 11.5 < log(M_{DM}/M_{sun}) < 11.8 and the stellar M/L is 0.6 < {\Upsilon} < 1.1. However, this stellar M/L is lower than predicted by its old stellar population. Moreover, the halo mass within the kinematic extent is ten times larger than expected based on {\Lambda}CDM predictions, and an extrapolation yields cluster sized dark halo masses. Adopting {\Upsilon} = 1.7 {\Upsilon}_{sun} yields more moderate dark halo virial masses, but these models fit the kinematics worse. A non-NFW model might solve the discrepancy between the unphysical consequences of the best-fitting dynamical models and models based on more reasonable assumptions for the dark halo and stellar mass-to-light ratio, which are disfavoured according to our parameter estimation.
  • We present a dynamical analysis to infer the structural parameters and properties of the two nearby, compact, high velocity dispersion galaxies MRK1216 & NGC1277. Combining deep HST imaging, wide-field IFU stellar kinematics, and complementary long-slit spectroscopic data out to 3 R_e, we construct orbit-based models to constrain their black hole masses, dark matter content and stellar mass-to-light ratios. We obtain a black hole mass of log(Mbh/Msun) = 10.1(+0.1/-0.2) for NGC1277 and an upper limit of log(Mbh/Msun) = 10.0 for MRK1216, within 99.7 per cent confidence. The stellar mass-to-light ratios span a range of Upsilon_V = 6.5(+1.5/-1.5) in NGC1277 and Upsilon_H = 1.8(+0.5/-0.8) in MRK1216 and are in good agreement with SSP models of a single power-law Salpeter IMF. Even though our models do not place strong constraints on the dark halo parameters, they suggest that dark matter is a necessary ingredient in MRK1216, with a dark matter contribution of 22(+30/-20) per cent to the total mass budget within 1 R_e. NGC1277, on the other hand, can be reproduced without the need for a dark halo, and a maximal dark matter fraction of 13 per cent within the same radial extent. In addition, we investigate the orbital structures of both galaxies, which are rotationally supported and consistent with photometric multi-S\'ersic decompositions, indicating that these compact objects do not host classical, non-rotating bulges formed during recent (z <= 2) dissipative events or through violent relaxation. Finally, both MRK 1216 and NGC 1277 are anisotropic, with a global anisotropy parameter delta of 0.33 and 0.58, respectively. While MRK 1216 follows the trend of fast-rotating, oblate galaxies with a flattened velocity dispersion tensor in the meridional plane of the order of beta_z = delta, NGC 1277 is highly tangentially anisotropic and seems to belong kinematically to a distinct class of objects.
  • Located in the Perseus cluster, NGC 1271 is an early-type galaxy with a small effective radius of 2.2 kpc and a large stellar velocity dispersion of 276 km/s for its K-band luminosity of 8.9x10^{10} L_sun. We present a mass measurement for the black hole in this compact, high-dispersion galaxy using observations from the integral field spectrograph NIFS on the Gemini North telescope assisted by laser guide star adaptive optics, large-scale integral field unit observations with PPAK at the Calar Alto Observatory, and Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 imaging observations. We are able to map out the stellar kinematics on small spatial scales, within the black hole sphere of influence, and on large scales that extend out to four times the galaxy's effective radius. We find that the galaxy is rapidly rotating and exhibits a sharp rise in the velocity dispersion. Through the use of orbit-based stellar dynamical models, we determine that the black hole has a mass of (3.0^{+1.0}_{-1.1}) x 10^9 M_sun and the H-band stellar mass-to-light ratio is 1.40^{+0.13}_{-0.11} M_sun/L_sun (1-sigma uncertainties). NGC 1271 occupies the sparsely-populated upper end of the black hole mass distribution, but is very different from the Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) and giant elliptical galaxies that are expected to host the most massive black holes. Interestingly, the black hole mass is an order of magnitude larger than expectations based on the galaxy's bulge luminosity, but is consistent with the mass predicted using the galaxy's bulge stellar velocity dispersion. More compact, high-dispersion galaxies need to be studied using high spatial resolution observations to securely determine black hole masses, as there could be systematic differences in the black hole scaling relations between these types of galaxies and the BCGs/giant ellipticals, thereby implying different pathways for black hole and galaxy growth.
  • The supermassive black hole of M87 is one of the most massive black holes known and has been the subject of several stellar and gas-dynamical mass measurements; however the most recent revision to the stellar-dynamical black hole mass measurement is a factor of about two larger than the previous gas-dynamical determinations. Here, we apply comprehensive gas-dynamical models that include the propagation of emission-line profiles through the telescope and spectrograph optics to new Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph observations from the Hubble Space Telescope. Unlike the previous gas-dynamical studies of M87, we map out the complete kinematic structure of the emission-line disk within about 40 pc from the nucleus, and find that a small amount of velocity dispersion internal to the gas disk is required to match the observed line widths. We examine a scenario in which the intrinsic velocity dispersion provides dynamical support to the disk, and determine that the inferred black hole mass increases by only 6%. Incorporating this effect into the error budget, we ultimately measure a mass of M_BH = (3.5^{+0.9}_{-0.7}) x 10^9 M_sun (68% confidence). Our gas-dynamical black hole mass continues to differ from the most recent stellar-dynamical mass by a factor of two, underscoring the need for carrying out more cross-checks between the two main black hole mass measurement methods.
  • The prominent broad Fe II emission blends in the spectra of active galactic nuclei have been shown to vary in response to continuum variations, but past attempts to measure the reverberation lag time of the optical Fe II lines have met with only limited success. Here we report the detection of Fe II reverberation in two Seyfert 1 galaxies, NGC 4593 and Mrk 1511, based on data from a program carried out at Lick Observatory in Spring 2011. Light curves for emission lines including H-beta and Fe II were measured by applying a fitting routine to decompose the spectra into several continuum and emission-line components, and we use cross-correlation techniques to determine the reverberation lags of the emission lines relative to V-band light curves. In both cases the measured lag (t_cen) of Fe II is longer than that of H-beta, although the inferred lags are somewhat sensitive to the choice of Fe II template used in the fit. For spectral decompositions done using the Fe II template of Veron-Cetty et al. (2004), we find t_cen(Fe II)/t_cen(H-beta) = 1.9+-0.6 in NGC 4593 and 1.5+-0.3 in Mrk 1511. The detection of highly correlated variations between Fe II and continuum emission demonstrates that the Fe II emission in these galaxies originates in photoionized gas, located predominantly in the outer portion of the broad-line region.
  • We present dynamical modeling of the broad line region (BLR) in the Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 50 using reverberation mapping data taken as part of the Lick AGN Monitoring Project (LAMP) 2011. We model the reverberation mapping data directly, constraining the geometry and kinematics of the BLR, as well as deriving a black hole mass estimate that does not depend on a normalizing factor or virial coefficient. We find that the geometry of the BLR in Mrk 50 is a nearly face-on thick disk, with a mean radius of 9.6(+1.2,-0.9) light days, a width of the BLR of 6.9(+1.2,-1.1) light days, and a disk opening angle of 25\pm10 degrees above the plane. We also constrain the inclination angle to be 9(+7,-5) degrees, close to face-on. Finally, the black hole mass of Mrk 50 is inferred to be log10(M(BH)/Msun) = 7.57(+0.44,-0.27). By comparison to the virial black hole mass estimate from traditional reverberation mapping analysis, we find the normalizing constant (virial coefficient) to be log10(f) = 0.78(+0.44,-0.27), consistent with the commonly adopted mean value of 0.74 based on aligning the M(BH)-{\sigma}* relation for AGN and quiescent galaxies. While our dynamical model includes the possibility of a net inflow or outflow in the BLR, we cannot distinguish between these two scenarios.
  • We present a new stellar dynamical mass measurement of the black hole in the nearby, S0 galaxy NGC 3998. By combining laser guide star adaptive optics observations obtained with the OH-Suppressing Infrared Imaging Spectrograph on the Keck II telescope with long-slit spectroscopy from the Hubble Space Telescope and the Keck I telescope, we map out the stellar kinematics on both small spatial scales, well within the black hole sphere of influence, and on large scales. We find that the galaxy is rapidly rotating and exhibits a sharp central peak in the velocity dispersion. Using the kinematics and the stellar luminosity density derived from imaging observations, we construct three-integral, orbit-based, triaxial stellar dynamical models. We find the black hole has a mass of M_BH = (8.1_{-1.9}^{+2.0}) x 10^8 M_sun, with an I-band stellar mass-to-light ratio of M/L = 5.0_{-0.4}^{+0.3} M_sun/L_sun (3-sigma uncertainties), and that the intrinsic shape of the galaxy is very round, but oblate. With the work presented here, NGC 3998 is now one of a very small number of galaxies for which both stellar and gas dynamical modeling have been used to measure the mass of the black hole. The stellar dynamical mass is nearly a factor of four larger than the previous gas dynamical black hole mass measurement. Given that this cross-check has so far only been attempted on a few galaxies with mixed results, carrying out similar studies in other objects is essential for quantifying the magnitude and distribution of the cosmic scatter in the black hole mass - host galaxy relations.
  • (Abridged) To investigate the black hole mass (MBH) vs. stellar velocity dispersion relation of active galaxies, we measured the velocity dispersions of a sample of local Seyfert 1 galaxies, for which we have recently determined MBH using reverberation mapping. For most objects, velocity dispersions were measured from high S/N ratio optical spectra centered on the Ca II triplet region (~8500 A), obtained at the Keck, Palomar, and Lick Observatories. For two objects, in which the Ca II triplet region was contaminated by nuclear emission, the measurement was based on high-quality H-band spectra obtained with the OSIRIS at the Keck-II Telescope. Combining our new measurements with data from the literature, we assemble a sample of 24 active galaxies with stellar velocity dispersions and reverberation-based MBH measurements in the range of black hole mass 10^6<MBH/M_sun<10^9. We use this sample to obtain reverberation mapping constraints on the slope and intrinsic scatter of the M-sigma relation of active galaxies. Assuming a constant virial coefficient f for the reverberation mapping black hole masses, we find a slope b=3.55+-0.60 and the intrinsic scatter sigma_int=0.43+-0.08 dex in the relation log (MBH/M_sun) = a + b log (sigma/200 km/s), which are consistent with those found for quiescent galaxies. We derive an updated value of the virial coefficient f by finding the value which places the reverberation masses in best agreement with the M-sigma relation of quiescent galaxies; using the quiescent M-sigma relation determined by Gultekin et al. we find log f=0.72^{+0.09-0.10} with an intrinsic scatter of 0.44+-0.07 dex. The uncertainty of the virial coefficient remains one of the main sources of the uncertainty in black hole mass determinations using reverberation mapping, and therefore also in single-epoch spectroscopic estimates of MBH in active galaxies.
  • The Lick AGN Monitoring Project targeted 13 nearby Seyfert 1 galaxies with the intent of measuring the masses of their central black holes using reverberation mapping. The sample includes 12 galaxies selected to have black holes with masses roughly in the range 10^6-10^7 solar masses, as well as the well-studied AGN NGC 5548. In conjunction with a spectroscopic monitoring campaign, we obtained broad-band B and V images on most nights from 2008 February through 2008 May. The imaging observations were carried out by four telescopes: the 0.76-m Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope (KAIT), the 2-m Multicolor Active Galactic Nuclei Monitoring (MAGNUM) telescope, the Palomar 60-in (1.5-m) telescope, and the 0.80-m Tenagra II telescope. Having well-sampled light curves over the course of a few months is useful for obtaining the broad-line reverberation lag and black hole mass, and also allows us to examine the characteristics of the continuum variability. In this paper, we discuss the observational methods and the photometric measurements, and present the AGN continuum light curves. We measure various variability characteristics of each of the light curves. We do not detect any evidence for a time lag between the B- and V-band variations, and we do not find significant color variations for the AGNs in our sample.
  • (Abridged) We present STIS observations of 14 nearby low-luminosity active galactic nuclei, including 13 LINERs and 1 Seyfert, taken at multiple parallel slit positions centered on the galaxy nuclei and covering the H-alpha spectral region. For each galaxy, we measure the emission-line velocities, line widths, and strengths, to map out the inner narrow-line region structure. There is a wide diversity among the velocity fields: in a few galaxies the gas is clearly in disk-like rotation, while in other galaxies the gas kinematics appear chaotic or are dominated by radial flows with multiple velocity components. The [S II] line ratio indicates a radial stratification in gas density, with a sharp increase within the inner 10-20 pc, in the majority of the Type 1 objects. We examine how the [N II] 6583 line width varies as a function of aperture size over a range of spatial scales, extending from scales comparable to the black hole's sphere of influence to scales dominated by the host galaxy's bulge. For most galaxies in the sample, we find that the emission-line velocity dispersion is largest within the black hole's gravitational sphere of influence, and decreases with increasing aperture size toward values similar to the bulge stellar velocity dispersion measured within ground-based apertures. Future dynamical modeling in order to determine black hole masses for a few objects in this sample may be worthwhile, although disorganized motion will limit the accuracy of the mass measurements.