• We present extensive optical and near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic observations of the stripped-envelope (SE) supernova SN 2010as. Spectroscopic peculiarities, such as initially weak helium features and low expansion velocities with a nearly flat evolution, place this object in the small family of events previously identified as transitional Type Ib/c supernovae (SNe). There is ubiquitous evidence of hydrogen, albeit weak, in this family of SNe, indicating that they are in fact a peculiar kind of Type IIb SNe that we name "flat-velocity Type IIb". The flat velocity evolution---which occurs at different levels between 6000 and 8000 km/s for different SNe---suggests the presence of a dense shell in the ejecta. Despite the spectroscopic similarities, these objects show surprisingly diverse luminosities. We discuss the possible physical or geometrical unification picture for such diversity. Using archival HST images we associate SN 2010as with a massive cluster and derive a progenitor age of ~6 Myr, assuming a single star-formation burst, which is compatible with a Wolf-Rayet progenitor. Our hydrodynamical modelling, on the contrary, indicates the pre-explosion mass was relatively low, of ~4 M_sol. The seeming contradiction between an young age and low pre-SN mass may be solved by a massive interacting binary progenitor.
  • There is evidence of an overdensity of strong intervening MgII absorption line systems distributed along the lines of sight towards GRB afterglows relative to quasar sight-lines. If this excess is real, one should also expect an overdensity of field galaxies around GRB sight-lines, as strong MgII tends to trace these sources. In this work, we test this expectation by calculating the two point angular correlation function of galaxies within 120$^{\prime\prime}$ ($\sim470~h_{71}^{-1}~\mathrm{Kpc}$ at $\langle z\rangle \sim0.4$) of GRB afterglows. We compare the Gamma-ray burst Optical and Near-infrared Detector (GROND) GRB afterglow sample -- one of the largest and most homogeneous samples of GRB fields -- with galaxies and AGN found in the COSMOS-30 photometric catalog. We find no significant signal of anomalous clustering of galaxies at an estimated median redshift of $z\sim0.3$ around GRB sight-lines, down to $K_{\mathrm{AB}}<19.3$. This result is contrary to the expectations from the MgII excess derived from GRB afterglow spectroscopy, although many confirmed galaxy counterparts to MgII absorbers may be too faint to detect in our sample -- especially those at $z>1$. We note that the addition of higher sensitivity Spitzer IRAC or HST WFC3 data for even a subset of our sample would increase this survey's depth by several orders of magnitude, simultaneously increasing statistics and enabling the investigation of a much larger redshift space.}
  • (...) Since 1998, only half a dozen spectroscopically confirmed associations have been discovered and XRF 100316D associated with the type-Ic SN 2010bh at z = 0.059 is among the latest. We began observations with GROND 12 hours after the GRB trigger and continued until 80 days after the burst. GROND provided excellent photometric data in six filter bands covering a wavelength range from approx. 350 to 1800 nm, significantly expanding the pre-existing data set for this event. Combining GROND and Swift data, the early broad-band SED is modelled with a blackbody and afterglow component attenuated by dust and gas absorption. The best-fit SED models imply moderate reddening along the line of sight through the host galaxy (A_V = 1.2 \pm 0.1 mag). The temperature and radius evolution of the thermal component are analysed and combined with earlier measurements available from the literature. This reveals a cooling envelope at an apparent initial radius of 7 \times 10^11 cm, which is compatible with a dense wind surrounding a Wolf-Rayet star. Multicolour templates of SN 1998bw are fitted to the SN to directly compare the light-curve properties. This shows that SN 2010bh is ~65% as bright as SN 1998bw. Reaching maximum brightness at ~8 days after the burst in the blue bands, SN 2010bh proves to be the most rapidly evolving GRB-SNe to date. Finally, a two-component parametrised model is fitted to the quasi-bolometric light curve, which delivers physical parameters of the explosion. This yields M_Ni = 0.21 \pm 0.03 M\bigodot and M_ej = 2.6 \pm 0.2 M\bigodot, typical of values within the GRB-SN population. The kinetic energy is 2.4 \pm 0.7 \times 10^52 erg, which is making this SN the second most energetic GRB-SN after SN 1998bw. This supernova has one of the earliest peaks ever recorded and thereafter fades more rapidly than other GRB-SNe, hypernovae, or typical type-Ic SNe. (...)
  • Using high-quality, broad-band afterglow data for GRB 091127, we investigate the validity of the synchrotron fireball model for gamma-ray bursts, and infer physical parameters of the ultra-relativistic outflow. We used multi-wavelength follow-up observations obtained with GROND and the XRT onboard the Swift satellite. The resulting afterglow light curve is of excellent accuracy, and the spectral energy distribution is well-sampled over 5 decades in energy. These data present one of the most comprehensive observing campaigns for a single GRB afterglow and allow us to test several proposed emission models and outflow characteristics in unprecedented detail. Both the multi-color light curve and the broad-band SED of the afterglow of GRB 091127 show evidence of a cooling break moving from high to lower energies. The early light curve is well described by a broken power-law, where the initial decay in the optical/NIR wavelength range is considerably flatter than at X-rays. Detailed fitting of the time-resolved SED shows that the break is very smooth with a sharpness index of 2.2 +- 0.2, and evolves towards lower frequencies as a power-law with index -1.23 +- 0.06. These are the first accurate and contemporaneous measurements of both the sharpness of the spectral break and its time evolution. The measured evolution of the cooling break (nu_c propto t^-1.2) is not consistent with the predictions of the standard model, wherein nu_c propto t^-0.5 is expected. A possible explanation for the observed behavior is a time dependence of the microphysical parameters, in particular the fraction of the total energy in the magnetic field epsilon_B. This conclusion provides further evidence that the standard fireball model is too simplistic, and time-dependent micro-physical parameters may be required to model the growing number of well-sampled afterglow light curves.