• Most existing datasets for speaker identification contain samples obtained under quite constrained conditions, and are usually hand-annotated, hence limited in size. The goal of this paper is to generate a large scale text-independent speaker identification dataset collected 'in the wild'. We make two contributions. First, we propose a fully automated pipeline based on computer vision techniques to create the dataset from open-source media. Our pipeline involves obtaining videos from YouTube; performing active speaker verification using a two-stream synchronization Convolutional Neural Network (CNN), and confirming the identity of the speaker using CNN based facial recognition. We use this pipeline to curate VoxCeleb which contains hundreds of thousands of 'real world' utterances for over 1,000 celebrities. Our second contribution is to apply and compare various state of the art speaker identification techniques on our dataset to establish baseline performance. We show that a CNN based architecture obtains the best performance for both identification and verification.
  • Our goal is to isolate individual speakers from multi-talker simultaneous speech in videos. Existing works in this area have focussed on trying to separate utterances from known speakers in controlled environments. In this paper, we propose a deep audio-visual speech enhancement network that is able to separate a speaker's voice given lip regions in the corresponding video, by predicting both the magnitude and the phase of the target signal. The method is applicable to speakers unheard and unseen during training, and for unconstrained environments. We demonstrate strong quantitative and qualitative results, isolating extremely challenging real-world examples.
  • We present a method for generating a video of a talking face. The method takes as inputs: (i) still images of the target face, and (ii) an audio speech segment; and outputs a video of the target face lip synched with the audio. The method runs in real time and is applicable to faces and audio not seen at training time. To achieve this we propose an encoder-decoder CNN model that uses a joint embedding of the face and audio to generate synthesised talking face video frames. The model is trained on tens of hours of unlabelled videos. We also show results of re-dubbing videos using speech from a different person.
  • The goal of this work is to recognise phrases and sentences being spoken by a talking face, with or without the audio. Unlike previous works that have focussed on recognising a limited number of words or phrases, we tackle lip reading as an open-world problem - unconstrained natural language sentences, and in the wild videos. Our key contributions are: (1) a 'Watch, Listen, Attend and Spell' (WLAS) network that learns to transcribe videos of mouth motion to characters; (2) a curriculum learning strategy to accelerate training and to reduce overfitting; (3) a 'Lip Reading Sentences' (LRS) dataset for visual speech recognition, consisting of over 100,000 natural sentences from British television. The WLAS model trained on the LRS dataset surpasses the performance of all previous work on standard lip reading benchmark datasets, often by a significant margin. This lip reading performance beats a professional lip reader on videos from BBC television, and we also demonstrate that visual information helps to improve speech recognition performance even when the audio is available.
  • The goal of this work is to recognise and localise short temporal signals in image time series, where strong supervision is not available for training. To this end we propose an image encoding that concisely represents human motion in a video sequence in a form that is suitable for learning with a ConvNet. The encoding reduces the pose information from an image to a single column, dramatically diminishing the input requirements for the network, but retaining the essential information for recognition. The encoding is applied to the task of recognizing and localizing signed gestures in British Sign Language (BSL) videos. We demonstrate that using the proposed encoding, signs as short as 10 frames duration can be learnt from clips lasting hundreds of frames using only weak (clip level) supervision and with considerable label noise.