• Using visible, radio, microwave, and sub-mm data, we study several lines of sight toward stars generally closer than 1 kpc on a component-by-component basis. We derive the component structure seen in absorption at visible wavelengths from Ca II, Ca I, K I, CH, CH$^{+}\!,$ and CN and compare it to emission from H I, CO and its isotopologues, and C$^{+}$ from the GOT C+ survey. The correspondence between components in emission and absorption help create a more unified picture of diffuse atomic and molecular gas in the interstellar medium. We also discuss how these tracers are related to the CO-dark H$_{2}$ gas probed by C$^{+}$ emission and discuss the kinematic connections among the species observed.
  • We present high-resolution (sub-parsec) observations of a giant molecular cloud in the nearest star-forming galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud. ALMA Band 6 observations trace the bulk of the molecular gas in $^{12}$CO(2-1) and high column density regions in $^{13}$CO(2-1). Our target is a quiescent cloud (PGCC G282.98-32.40, which we refer to as the "Planck cold cloud" or PCC) in the southern outskirts of the galaxy where star-formation activity is very low and largely confined to one location. We decompose the cloud into structures using a dendrogram and apply an identical analysis to matched-resolution cubes of the 30 Doradus molecular cloud (located near intense star formation) for comparison. Structures in the PCC exhibit roughly 10 times lower surface density and 5 times lower velocity dispersion than comparably sized structures in 30 Dor, underscoring the non-universality of molecular cloud properties. In both clouds, structures with relatively higher surface density lie closer to simple virial equilibrium, whereas lower surface density structures tend to exhibit super-virial line widths. In the PCC, relatively high line widths are found in the vicinity of an infrared source whose properties are consistent with a luminous young stellar object. More generally, we find that the smallest resolved structures ("leaves") of the dendrogram span close to the full range of line widths observed across all scales. As a result, while the bulk of the kinetic energy is found on the largest scales, the small-scale energetics tend to be dominated by only a few structures, leading to substantial scatter in observed size-linewidth relationships.
  • We present and analyze deep Herschel/HIFI observations of the [CII] 158um, [CI] 609um, and [CI] 370um lines towards 54 lines-of-sight (LOS) in the Large and Small Magellanic clouds. These observations are used to determine the physical conditions of the line--emitting gas, which we use to study the transition from atomic to molecular gas and from C^+ to C^0 to CO in their low metallicity environments. We trace gas with molecular fractions in the range 0.1<f(H2)<1, between those in the diffuse H2 gas detected by UV absorption (f(H2)<0.2) and well shielded regions in which hydrogen is essentially completely molecular. The C^0 and CO column densities are only measurable in regions with molecular fractions f(H2)>0.45 in both the LMC and SMC. Ionized carbon is the dominant gas-phase form of this element that is associated with molecular gas, with C^0 and CO representing a small fraction, implying that most (89% in the LMC and 77% in the SMC) of the molecular gas in our sample is CO-dark H2. The mean X_CO conversion factors in our LMC and SMC sample are larger than the value typically found in the Milky Way. When applying a correction based on the filling factor of the CO emission, we find that the values of X_CO in the LMC and SMC are closer to that in the Milky Way. The observed [CII] intensity in our sample represents about 1% of the total far-infrared intensity from the LOSs observed in both Magellanic Clouds.
  • We have obtained OH spectra of four transitions in the $^2\Pi_{3/2}$ ground state, at 1612, 1665, 1667, and 1720 MHz, toward 51 sightlines that were observed in the Herschel project Galactic Observations of Terahertz C+. The observations cover the longitude range of (32$^\circ$, 64$^\circ$) and (189$^\circ$, 207$^\circ$) in the northern Galactic plane. All of the diffuse OH emissions conform to the so-called 'Sum Rule' of the four brightness temperatures, indicating optically thin emission condition for OH from diffuse clouds in the Galactic plane. The column densities of the HI `halos' N(HI) surrounding molecular clouds increase monotonically with OH column density, N(OH), until saturating when N(HI)=1.0 x 10$^{21}$ cm$^{-2}$ and N (OH) $\geq 4.5\times 10^{15}$ cm$^{-2}$, indicating the presence of molecular gas that cannot be traced by HI. Such a linear correlation, albeit weak, is suggestive of HI halos' contribution to the UV shielding required for molecular formation. About 18% of OH clouds have no associated CO emission (CO-dark) at a sensitivity of 0.07 K but are associated with C$^+$ emission. A weak correlation exists between C$^+$ intensity and OH column density for CO-dark molecular clouds. These results imply that OH seems to be a better tracer of molecular gas than CO in diffuse molecular regions.
  • UV absorption studies with FUSE have observed H2 molecular gas in translucent and diffuse clouds. Observations of the 158 micron [C II] fine structure line with Herschel also trace the same H2 molecular gas in emission. We present [C II] observations along 27 lines of sight (LOSs) towards target stars of which 25 have FUSE H2 UV absorption. We detect [C II] emission features in all but one target LOS. For three Target LOSs, which are close to the Galactic plane, we also present position-velocity maps of [C II] emission observed by HIFI in on-the-fly spectral line mapping. We use the velocity resolved [C II] spectra towards the target LOSs observed by FUSE to identify C II] velocity components associated with the H2 clouds. We analyze the observed velocity integrated [C II] spectral line intensities in terms of the densities and thermal pressures in the H2 gas using the H2 column densities and temperatures measured by the UV absorption data. We present the H2 gas densities and thermal pressures for 26 target LOSs and from the [C II] intensities derive a mean thermal pressure in the range 6100 to 7700 K cm^-3 in diffuse H2 clouds. We discuss the thermal pressures and densities towards 14 targets, comparing them to results obtained using the UV absorption data for two other tracers CI and CO.
  • Observations suggest that there is a significant fraction of O-stars in the field of the Milky Way that appear to have formed in isolation or in low mass clusters ($<$100 $M_\odot$). The existence of these high-mass stars that apparently formed in the field challenges the generally accepted paradigm, which requires star formation to occur in clustered environments. In order to understand the physical conditions for the formation of these stars, it is necessary to observe isolated high-mass stars while they are still forming. With the $Hubble$ $Space$ $Telescope$, we observe the seven most isolated massive ($>$8 $M_\odot$) young stellar objects (MYSOs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The observations show that while these MYSOs are remote from other MYSOs, OB associations, and even from known giant molecular clouds, they are actually not isolated at all. Imaging reveals $\sim$100 to several hundred pre--main-sequence (PMS) stars in the vicinity of each MYSO. These previously undetected PMS stars form prominent compact clusters around the MYSOs, and in most cases they are also distributed sparsely across the observed regions. Contrary to what previous high-mass field star studies show, these observations suggest that high-mass stars may not be able to form in clusters with masses less than 100 $M_\odot$. If these MYSOs are indeed the best candidates for isolated high-mass star formation, then the lack of isolation is at odds with random sampling of the IMF. Moreover, while isolated MYSOs may not exist, we find evidence that isolated clusters containing O-stars can exist, which in itself is rare.
  • We study the effects of an asymmetric radiation field on the properties of a molecular cloud envelope. We employ observations of carbon monoxide (12CO and 13CO), atomic carbon, ionized carbon, and atomic hydrogen to analyze the chemical and physical properties of the core and envelope of L1599B, a molecular cloud forming a portion of the ring at approximately 27 pc from the star Lambda Ori. The O III star provides an asymmetric radiation field that produces a moderate enhancement of the external radiation field. Observations of the [CII] fine structure line with the GREAT instrument on SOFIA indicate a significant enhanced emission on the side of the cloud facing the star, while the [Ci], 12CO and 13CO J = 1-0 and 2-1, and 12CO J = 3-2 data from the PMO and APEX telescopes suggest a relatively typical cloud interior. The atomic, ionic, and molecular line centroid velocities track each other very closely, and indicate that the cloud may be undergoing differential radial motion. The HI data from the Arecibo GALFA survey and the SOFIA/GREAT [CII] data do not suggest any systematic motion of the halo gas, relative to the dense central portion of the cloud traced by 12CO and 13CO.
  • We present the first large scale high angular resolution survey of ionized nitrogen in the Galactic Plane through emission of its two fine structure transitions ([NII]) at 122 $\mu$m and 205 $\mu$m. The observations were largely obtained with the PACS instrument onboard the Herschel Space Observatory. The lines-of-sight were in the Galactic plane, following those of the Herschel OTKP project GOT C+. Both lines are reliably detected at the 10$^{-8}$ - 10$^{-7}$ $W$m$^{-2}$sr$^{-1}$ level over the range -60$^{o}$ $\leq$ $l$ $\leq$ 60$^{o}$. The $rms$ of the intensity among the 25 PACS spaxels of a given pointing is typically less than one third of the mean intensity, showing that the emission is extended. [NII] is produced in gas in which hydrogen is ionized, and collisional excitation is by electrons. The ratio of the two fine structure transitions provides a direct measurement of the electron density, yielding $n(e)$ largely in the range 10 to 50 cm$^{-3}$ with an average value of 29 cm$^{-3}$ and N$^+$ column densities 10$^{16}$ to 10$^{17}$ cm$^{-2}$. [NII] emission is highly correlated with that of [CII], and we calculate that between 1/3 and 1/2 of the [CII] emission is associated with the ionized gas. The relatively high electron densities indicate that the source of the [NII] emission is not the Warm Ionized Medium (WIM), which has electron densities more than 100 times smaller. Possible origins of the observed [NII] include the ionized surfaces of dense atomic and molecular clouds, the extended low density envelopes of HII regions, and low-filling factor high-density fluctuations of the WIM.
  • The luminosity of [C II] is used to probe the star formation rate in galaxies, but the correlation breaks down in some active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Models of the [C II] emission from galactic nuclei do not include the influence of X-rays on the carbon ionization balance, which may be a factor in reducing the [C II] luminosity. We calculate the [C II] luminosity in galactic nuclei under the influence of bright sources of X-rays. We solve the balance equation of the ionization states of carbon as a function of X-ray flux, electron, atomic hydrogen, and molecular hydrogen density. These are input to models of [CII] emission from the interstellar medium (ISM) in galactic nuclei. We also solve the distribution of the ionization states of oxygen and nitrogen in highly ionized regions. We find that the dense warm ionized medium (WIM) and dense photon dominated regions (PDRs) dominate the [C II] emission when no X-rays are present. The X-rays in galactic nuclei can affect strongly the C$^+$ abundance in the WIM converting some fraction to C$^{2+}$ and higher ionization states and thus reducing its [C II] luminosity. For an X-ray luminosity > 10$^{43}$ erg/s the [C II] luminosity can be suppressed by a factor of a few, and for very strong sources, >10$^{44}$ erg/s, such as found for many AGNs by an order of magnitude. Comparison of the model with extragalactic sources shows that the [C II] to far-infrared ratio declines for an X-ray luminosity >10$^{43}$ erg/s, in reasonable agreement with our model.
  • We study the relationship between the [CII] emission and the star formation rate (SFR) in the Galactic plane and separate the relationship of different ISM phases to the SFR. We compare these relationships to those in external galaxies and local clouds, allowing examinations of these relationships over a wide range of physical scales. We compare the distribution of the [CII] emission, with its different contributing ISM phases, as a function of Galactocentric distance with the SFR derived from radio continuum observations. We also compare the SFR with the surface density distribution of atomic and molecular gas, including the CO-dark H2 component. The [CII] and SFR are well correlated at Galactic scales with a relationship that is in general agreement with that found for external galaxies. By combining [CII] and SFR data points in the Galactic plane with those in external galaxies and nearby star forming regions, we find that a single scaling relationship between the [CII] luminosity and SFR applies over six orders of magnitude. The [CII] emission from different ISM phases are each correlated with the SFR, but only the combined emission shows a slope that is consistent with extragalactic observations. These ISM components have roughly comparable contributions to the Galactic [CII] luminosity: dense PDRs (30%), cold HI (25%), CO-dark H2 (25%), and ionized gas (20%). The SFR-gas surface density relationship shows a steeper slope compared to that observed in galaxies, but one that it is consistent with those seen in nearby clouds. The different slope is a result of the use of a constant CO-to-H2 conversion factor in the extragalactic studies, which in turn is related to the assumption of constant metallicity in galaxies. We find a linear correlation between the SFR surface density and that of the dense molecular gas.
  • We present parsec scale interferometric maps of HCN(1-0) and HCO$^{+}$(1-0) emission from dense gas in the star-forming region 30 Doradus, obtained using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. This extreme star-forming region, located in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), is characterized by a very intense ultraviolet ionizing radiation field and sub-solar metallicity, both of which are expected to impact molecular cloud structure. We detect 13 bright, dense clumps within the 30 Doradus-10 giant molecular cloud. Some of the clumps are aligned along a filamentary structure with a characteristic spacing that is consistent with formation via the varicose fluid instability. Our analysis shows that the filament is gravitationally unstable and collapsing to form stars. There is a good correlation between HCO$^{+}$ emission in the filament and signatures of recent star formation activity including H$_{2}$O masers and young stellar objects (YSOs). YSOs seem to continue along the same direction of the filament toward the massive compact star cluster R136 in the southwest. We present detailed comparisons of clump properities (masses, linewidths, sizes) in 30Dor-10 to those in other star forming regions of the LMC (N159, N113, N105, N44). Our analysis shows that the 30Dor-10 clumps have similar mass but wider linewidths and similar HCN/HCO$^{+}$ (1-0) line ratios as clumps detected in other LMC star-forming regions. Our results suggest that the dense molecular gas clumps in the interior of 30Dor-10 are well-shielded against the intense ionizing field that is present in the 30Doradus region.
  • [Abridged] The [CII] 158um line is an important tool for understanding the life cycle of interstellar matter. Ionized carbon is present in a variety of phases of the interstellar medium, including the diffuse ionized medium, warm and cold atomic clouds, clouds in transition from atomic to molecular, and dense and warm photon dominated regions (PDRs). The Galactic Observations of Terahertz C+ (GOTC+) project surveys the [CII] line over the entire Galactic disk with velocity-resolved observations using the Herschel/HIFI instrument. We present the first longitude-velocity maps of the [CII] emission for Galactic latitudes b=0deg, +-0.5deg, and +-1.0deg. [CII] emission is mostly associated with spiral arms, mainly emerging from Galactocentric distances between 4 and 10 kpc. We estimate that most of the observed [CII] emission is produced by dense PDRs (47%), with smaller contributions from CO-dark H2 gas (28%), cold atomic gas (21%), and ionized gas (4%). Atomic gas inside the Solar radius is mostly in the form of cold neutral medium (CNM), while the warm neutral medium (WNM) gas dominates the outer galaxy. The average fraction of CNM relative to total atomic gas is 43%. We find that the warm and diffuse CO-dark H2 is distributed over a larger range of Galactocentric distances (4-11 kpc) than the cold and dense H2 gas traced by 12CO and 13CO (4-8kpc). The fraction of CO-dark H2 to total H2 increases with Galactocentric distance, ranging from 20% at 4 kpc to 80% at 10 kpc. On average, CO-dark H2 accounts for 30% of the molecular mass of the Milky Way. When the CO-dark H2 component is included, the radial distribution of the CO-to-H2 conversion factor is steeper than that when only molecular gas traced by CO is considered. Most of the observed [CII] emission emerging from dense PDRs is associated with modest far-ultraviolet fields in the range chi0~1-30.
  • We analyze the collisional excitation of the 158 micron (1900.5 GHz) fine structure transition of ionized carbon (C+) in terms of line intensities produced by simple cloud models. The single C+ fine structure transition is a very important coolant of the atomic interstellar medium and of photon dominated regions in which carbon is partially or completely in ionized form. The [CII] line is widely used as a tracer of star formation in the Milky Way and other galaxies. Excitation of the [CII] fine structure transition can be via collisions with hydrogen molecules, atoms, and electrons. Velocity-resolved observations of [CII] have become possible with the HIFI instrument on Herschel and the GREAT instrument on SOFIA. Analysis of these observations is complicated by the fact that it is difficult to determine the optical depth of the [CII] line due to the relative weakness and blending of the components of the analogous transition of 13C$+. We discuss the excitation and radiative transition of the [CII] line, deriving analytic results for several limiting cases and carry out numerical solutions using a large velocity gradient model for a more inclusive analysis. We show that for antenna temperatures up to 1/3 of the brightness temperature of the gas kinetic temperature, the antenna temperature is linearly proportional to the column density of C+ irrespective of the optical depth of the transition, which can be referred to as the effectively optically thin (EOT) approximation. We review the critical densities for excitation of the [CII] line by various collision partners. We briefly analyze C+ absorption and conclude with a discussion of C+ cooling and how the considerations for line intensities affect the behavior of this important coolant of the ISM.
  • (Abridged) The 30 Dor region in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is the most vigorous star-forming region in the Local Group. Star formation in this region is taking place in low-metallicity molecular gas that is exposed to an extreme far--ultraviolet (FUV) radiation field powered by the massive compact star cluster R136. We used the NANTEN2 telescope to obtain high-angular resolution observations of the 12CO 4-3, 7-6, and 13CO 4-3 rotational lines and [CI] 3P1-3P0 and 3P2-3P1 fine-structure submillimeter transitions in 30Dor-10, the brightest CO and FIR-emitting cloud at the center of the 30Dor region. We derived the properties of the low-metallicity molecular gas using an excitation/radiative transfer code and found a self-consistent solution of the chemistry and thermal balance of the gas in the framework of a clumpy cloud PDR model. We compared the derived properties with those in the N159W region, which is exposed to a more moderate far-ultraviolet radiation field compared with 30Dor-10, but has similar metallicity. We also combined our CO detections with previously observed low-J CO transitions to derive the CO spectral-line energy distribution in 30Dor-10 and N159W. The separate excitation analysis of the submm CO lines and the neutral carbon fine structure lines shows that the mid-J CO and [CI]-emitting gas in the 30Dor-10 region has a temperature of about 160 K and a H2 density of about 10^4 cm^-3. We find that the molecular gas in 30Dor-10 is warmer and has a lower beam filling factor compared to that of N159W, which might be a result of the effect of a strong FUV radiation field heating and disrupting the low--metallicity molecular gas. We use a clumpy PDR model (including the [CII] line intensity reported in the literature) to constrain the FUV intensity to about chi_0 ~ 3100 and an average total H density of the clump ensemble of about 10^5 cm^-3 in 30Dor-10.
  • We report the results of a high spatial (parsec) resolution HCO+ (J = 1-0) and HCN (J = 1-0) emission survey toward the giant molecular clouds of the star formation regions N105, N113, N159, and N44 in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The HCO+ and HCN observations at 89.2 and 88.6 GHz, respectively, were conducted in the compact configuration of the Australia Telescope Compact Array. The emission is imaged into individual clumps with masses between 10^2 and 10^4 solar masses and radii of <1 pc to ~2 pc. Many of the clumps are coincident with indicators of current massive star formation, indicating that many of the clumps are associated with deeply-embedded forming stars and star clusters. We find that massive YSO-bearing clumps tend to be larger (>1 pc), more massive (M > 10^3 solar masses), and have higher surface densities (~1 g cm^-2), while clumps without signs of star formation are smaller (<1 pc), less massive (M < 10^3 solar masses), and have lower surface densities (~0.1 g cm^-2). The dearth of massive (M >10^3 solar masses) clumps not bearing massive YSOs suggests the onset of star formation occurs rapidly once the clump has attained physical properties favorable to massive star formation. Using a large sample of LMC massive YSO mid-IR spectra, we estimate that ~2/3 of the massive YSOs for which there are Spitzer mid-IR spectra are no longer located in molecular clumps; we estimate that these young stars/clusters have destroyed their natal clumps on a time scale of at least 3 x 10^{5}$ yrs.
  • We present maps of the plane-of-sky magnetic field within two regions of the Taurus molecular cloud: one in the dense core L1495/B213 filament, the other in a diffuse region to the west. The field is measured from the polarization of background starlight seen through the cloud. In total, we measured 287 high-quality near-infrared polarization vectors in these regions. In L1495/B213, the percent polarization increases with column density up to Av ~ 9 mag, the limits of our data. The Radiative Torques model for grain alignment can explain this behavior, but models that invoke turbulence are inconsistent with the data. We also combine our data with published optical and near-infrared polarization measurements in Taurus. Using this large sample, we estimate the strength of the plane-of-sky component of the magnetic field in nine subregions. This estimation is done with two different techniques that use the observed dispersion in polarization angles. Our values range from 5-82 microgauss and tend to be higher in denser regions. In all subregions, the critical index of the mass-to-magnetic flux ratio is sub-unity, implying that Taurus is magnetically supported on large scales (~2 pc). Within the region observed, the B213 filament makes a sharp turn to the north and the direction of the magnetic field also takes a sharp turn, switching from being perpendicular to the filament to becoming parallel. This behavior can be understood if we are observing the rim of a bubble. We argue that it has resulted from a supernova remnant associated with a recently discovered nearby gamma-ray pulsar.
  • (abridged) We report a study of the relation between dust and gas over a 100deg^2 area in the Taurus molecular cloud. We compare the H2 column density derived from dust extinction with the CO column density derived from the 12CO and 13CO J= 1-0 lines. We derive the visual extinction from reddening determined from 2MASS data. The comparison is done at an angular size of 200", corresponding to 0.14pc at a distance of 140pc. We find that the relation between visual extinction Av and N(CO) is linear between Av~3 and 10 mag in the region associated with the B213--L1495 filament. In other regions the linear relation is flattened for Av > 4 mag. We find that the presence of temperature gradients in the molecular gas affects the determination of N(CO) by ~30--70% with the largest difference occurring at large column densities. Adding a correction for this effect and accounting for the observed relation between the column density of CO and CO2 ices and Av, we find a linear relationship between the column of carbon monoxide and dust for observed visual extinctions up to the maximum value in our data 23mag. We have used these data to study a sample of dense cores in Taurus. Fitting an analytical column density profile to these cores we derive an average volume density of about 1.4e4 cm^-3 and a CO depletion age of about 4.2e5 years. We estimate the H2 mass of Taurus to be about 1.5e4 M_sun, independently derived from the Av and N(CO) maps. We derive a CO integrated intensity to H2 conversion factor of about 2.1e20 cm^-2 (K km/s)^-1, which applies even in the region where the [CO]/[H_2] ratio is reduced by up to two orders of magnitude. The distribution of column densities in our Taurus maps resembles a log--normal function but shows tails at large and low column densities.
  • The [CII] fine--structure line at 158um is an excellent tracer of the warm diffuse gas in the ISM and the interfaces between molecular clouds and their surrounding atomic and ionized envelopes. Here we present the initial results from Galactic Observations of Terahertz C+ (GOTC+), a Herschel Key Project devoted to study the [CII] fine structure emission in the galactic plane using the HIFI instrument. We use the [CII] emission together with observations of CO as a probe to understand the effects of newly--formed stars on their interstellar environment and characterize the physical and chemical state of the star-forming gas. We collected data along 16 lines--of--sight passing near star forming regions in the inner Galaxy near longitudes 330 degrees and 20 degrees. We identify fifty-eight [CII] components that are associated with high--column density molecular clouds as traced by 13CO emission. We combine [CII], 12CO, and 13CO observations to derive the physical conditions of the [CII]--emitting regions in our sample of high--column density clouds based on comparison with results from a grid of Photon Dominated Region (PDR) models. From this unbiased sample, our results suggest that most of [CII] emission originates from clouds with H2 volume densities between 10e3.5 and 10e5.5 cm^-3 and weak FUV strength (CHI_0=1-10). We find two regions where our analysis suggests high densities >10e5 cm^-3 and strong FUV fields (CHI=10e4-10e6), likely associated with massive star formation. We suggest that [CII] emission in conjunction with CO isotopes is a good tool to differentiate between regions of massive star formation (high densities/strong FUV fields) and regions that are distant from massive stars (lower densities/weaker FUV fields) along the line--of--sight
  • Spitzer and IRAS observations of the LMC suggest an excess of FIR emission with respect to the gas surface density traced by 12CO and HI 21 cm emission lines. This "FIR excess" is noticeable near molecular clouds in the LMC, and has usually been interpreted as the presence of a self-shielded H2 component not traced by CO molecular clouds' envelopes. Based on Herschel observations, we examine the correlation between gas and dust at higher resolution than previously achieved. We consider three additional causes for the FIR excess: X factor, FIR dust emissivity, and gas-to-dust ratio variations between the diffuse and dense phases of the ISM. We examine the structure of NT80 and NT71, two molecular clouds detected in the NANTEN 12CO survey of the LMC. Dust surface density maps are derived from the HERITAGE data. The gas phase is traced by MAGMA 12CO and ATCA HI 21 cm observations of the LMC. The dust emissivity, gas-to-dust ratio, and X factor required to match the dust and gas surface densities are derived, and their correlations with the dust surface density are examined. The dust surface density is spatially correlated with the atomic and molecular gas phases. The dust temperature is consistently lower in the dense phase of the ISM than in the diffuse phase. We confirm variations in the ratio of FIR emission to gas surface density derived from HI and CO observations. There is an excess of FIR emission, spatially correlated with regions of intermediate HI and dust surface densities (Av = 1-2), and little or no CO. While there is no significant trend in the dust emissivity or gas-to-dust ratio with dust surface density, the X factor is enhanced at Av = 1-2. We conclude that H2 envelopes not traced by CO and X factor variations close to the CO boundary are more likely to cause these deviations between FIR emission and gas surface density than gas-to-dust ratio or emissivity variations.
  • New 12CO J=4-3 and 13CO J=3-2 observations of the N159 region in the Large Magellanic Cloud have been made. The 12CO J=4-3 distribution is separated into three clumps. These new measurements toward the three clumps are used in coupled calculations of molecular rotational excitation and line radiation transfer, along with other transitions of the 12CO as well as the isotope transitions of 13CO. The temperatures and densities are determined to be ~70-80K and ~3x10^3 cm-3 in N159W and N159E and ~30K and ~1.6x10^3 cm-3 in N159S. These results are compared with the star formation activity. The N159E clump is associated with embedded cluster(s) as observed at 24 micron and the derived high temperature is explained as due to the heating by these sources. The N159E clump is likely responsible for a dark lane in a large HII region by the dust extinction. The N159W clump is associated with embedded clusters mainly toward the eastern edge of the clump only. These clusters show offsets of 20"-40" from the 12CO J=4-3 peak and are probably responsible for heating indicated by the derived high temperature. The N159W clump exhibits no sign of star formation toward the 12CO J=4-3 peak position and its western region. We suggest that the N159W peak represents a pre-star-cluster core of ~105M_sol which deserves further detailed studies. Note that recent star formation took place between N159W and N159E as indicated by several star clusters and HII regions, while the natal molecular gas toward the stars have already been dissipated by the ionization and stellar winds of the OB stars. The N159S clump shows little sign of star formation as is consistent with the lower temperature and somewhat lower density. The N159S clump is also a candidate for future star formation.
  • We present a complete 12CO J = 1-0 map of the prominent molecular ridge in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) obtained with the 22-m ATNF Mopra Telescope. The region stretches southward by ~2 degrees, (or 1.7kpc) from 30 Doradus, the most vigorous star-forming region in the Local Group. The location of this molecular ridge is unique insofar as it allows us to study the properties of molecular gas as a function of the ambient radiation field in a low-metallicity environment. We find that the physical properties of CO-emitting clumps within the molecular ridge do not vary with the strength of the far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation field. Since the peak CO brightness of the clumps shows no correlation with the radiation field strength, the observed constant value for CO-to-H_2 conversion factor along the ridge seems to require an increase in the kinetic temperature of the molecular gas that is offset by a decrease in the angular filling factor of the CO emission. We find that the difference between the CO-to-H_2 conversion factor in the molecular ridge and the outer Milky Way is smaller than has been reported by previous studies of the CO emission: applying the same cloud identification and analysis methods to our CO observations of the LMC molecular ridge and CO data from the outer Galaxy survey by Dame et al. (2001), we find that the average CO-to-H_2 conversion factor in the molecular ridge is X_CO = (3.9+/-2.5)10^20 cm^-2 (K km s^-1)^-1, approximately twice the value that we determine for the outer Galaxy clouds. The mass spectrum and the scaling relations between the properties of the CO clumps in the molecular ridge are similar, but not identical, to those that have been established for Galactic molecular clouds.
  • With the ATNF Mopra telescope we are performing a survey in the 12CO(1-0) line to map the molecular gas in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). For some regions we also obtained interferometric maps of the high density gas tracers HCO+ and HCN with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). Here we discuss the properties of the elongated molecular complex that stretches about 2 kpc southward from 30 Doradus. Our data suggests that the complex, which we refer to as the ``molecular ridge,'' is not a coherent feature but consists of many smaller clumps that share the same formation history. Likely molecular cloud formation triggers are shocks and shearing forces that are present in the surrounding south-eastern HI overdensity region, a region influenced by strong ram pressure and tidal forces. The molecular ridge is at the western edge of the the overdensity region where a bifurcated velocity structure transitions into a single disk velocity component. We find that the 12CO(1-0) and HI emission peaks in the molecular ridge are typically near each other but never coincide. A likely explanation is the conversion of warmer, low-opacity HI to colder, high-opacity HI from which H2 subsequently forms. On smaller scales, we find that very dense molecular gas, as traced by interferometric HCO+ and HCN maps, is associated with star formation along shocked filaments and with rims of expanding shell-like structures, both created by feedback from massive stars.
  • We use the Barnard 68 dark globule as a test case for a spherically symmetric PDR model exposed to low-UV radiation fields. With a roughly spherical morphology and an accurately determined density profile, Barnard 68 is ideal for this purpose. The processes governing the energy balance in the cloud surface are studied in detail. We compare the spherically symmetric PDR model by Stoerzer, Stutzki & Sternberg (1996) to observations of the three lowest rotational transitions of 12CO, 13CO J = 2-1 and J = 3-2 as well as the [CI] 3P_1-3P_0 fine structure transition. We study the role of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the chemical network of the PDR model and consider the impact of depletion as well as of a variation of the external FUV field. We find it difficult to simultaneously model the observed 12CO and 13CO emission. The 12CO and [CI] emission can be explained by a PDR model with a external FUV field of 1-0.75 chi_0, but this model fails to reproduce the observed 13CO by a factor of ~2. Adding PAHs to the chemical network increases the [CI] emission by 50% in our model but makes [CII] very faint. CO depletion only slightly reduces the 12CO and 13CO line intensity (by <10% and <20%, respectively). Predictions for the [CII] 2P_3/2-2P_1/2, [CI] 3P_2-3P_1 and 12CO J= 5-4 and 4-3 transitions are presented. This allows a test of our model with future observations (APEX, NANTEN2, HERSCHEL, SOFIA).