• Some applications in scientific imaging, like space-based high-precision photometry, benefit from a detailed characterization of the sensitivity variation within a pixel. A detailed map of the intra-pixel sensitivity (IPS) allows to increase the photometric accuracy by correcting for the impact of the tiny sub-pixel movements of the image sensor during integration. This paper reports the measurement of the sub-pixel sensitivity variation and the extraction of the IPS map of a front-side illuminated CMOS image sensor with a pixel pitch of 6 \boldmath$\mu m$. Our optical measurement setup focuses a collimated beam onto the imaging surface with a microscope objective. The spot was scanned in a raster over a single pixel to probe the pixel response at each (sub-pixel) scan position. We model the optical setup in ZEMAX to cross-validate the optical spot profile described by an Airy diffraction pattern. In this work we introduce a forward modeling technique to derive the variation of the IPS. We model the optical spot scanning system and discretize the CMOS pixel response. Fitting this model to the measured data allows us to quantify the spatial sensitivity variation within a single pixel. Finally, we compare our results to those obtained from the more commonly used Wiener deconvolution.
  • The second Gaia data release is expected to contain data products from about 22 months of observation. Based on these data, we aim to provide an advance publication of a full-sky Gaia map of RR Lyrae stars. Although comprehensive, these data still contain a significant fraction of sources which are insufficiently sampled for Fourier series decomposition of the periodic light variations. The challenges in the identification of RR Lyrae candidates with (much) fewer than 20 field-of-view transits are described. General considerations of the results, their limitations, and interpretation are presented together with prospects for improvement in subsequent Gaia data releases.
  • In this article we present an overview of the ESA Gaia mission and of the unprecedented impact that Gaia will have on the field of variable star research. We summarise the contents and impact of the first Gaia data release on the description of variability phenomena, with particular emphasis on pulsating star research. The Tycho-Gaia astrometric solution, although limited to 2.1 million stars, has been used in many studies related to pulsating stars. Furthermore a set of 3,194 Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars with their times series have been released. Finally we present the plans for the ongoing study of variable phenomena with Gaia and highlight some of the possible impacts of the second data release on variable, and specifically, pulsating stars.
  • The Kepler space telescope has provided time series of red giants of such unprecedented quality that a detailed asteroseismic analysis becomes possible. For a limited set of about a dozen red giants, the observed oscillation frequencies obtained by peak-bagging together with the most recent pulsation codes allowed us to reliably determine the core/envelope rotation ratio. The results so far show that the current models are unable to reproduce the rotation ratios, predicting higher values than what is observed and thus indicating that an efficient angular momentum transport mechanism should be at work. Here we provide an asteroseismic analysis of a sample of 13 low-luminosity low-mass red giant stars observed by Kepler during its first nominal mission. These targets form a subsample of the 19 red giants studied previously Corsaro et al. 2015, which not only have a large number of extracted oscillation frequencies, but also unambiguous mode identifications We aim to extend the sample of red giants for which internal rotation ratios obtained by theoretical modeling of peak-bagged frequencies are available. We also derive the rotation ratios using different methods, and compare the results of these methods with each other. We built seismic models using a grid search combined with a Nelder-Mead simplex algorithm and obtained rotation averages employing Bayesian inference and inversion methods. We compared these averages with those obtained using a previously developed model-independent method. We find that the cores of the red giants in this sample are rotating 5 to 10 times faster than their envelopes, which is consistent with earlier results. The rotation rates computed from the different methods show good agreement for some targets, while some discrepancies exist for others.
  • In the context of high-quality asteroseismic data provided by the NASA Kepler mission, we developed a new code, termed Diamonds (high-DImensional And multi-MOdal NesteD Sampling), for fast Bayesian parameter estimation and model comparison by means of the Nested Sampling Monte Carlo (NSMC) algorithm, an efficient and powerful method very suitable for high-dimensional problems (like the peak bagging analysis of solar-like oscillations) and multi-modal problems (i.e. problems that show multiple solutions). We applied the code to the peak bagging analysis of solar-like oscillations observed in a challenging F-type star. By means of Diamonds one is able to detect the different backgrounds in the power spectrum of the star (e.g. stellar granulation and faculae activity) and to understand whether one or two oscillation peaks can be identified or not. In addition, we demonstrate a novel approach to peak bagging based on multimodality, which is able to reduce significantly the number of free parameters involved in the peak bagging model. This novel approach is therefore of great interest for possible future automatization of the entire analysis technique.
  • The peak bagging analysis, namely the fitting and identification of single oscillation modes in stars' power spectra, coupled to the very high-quality light curves of red giant stars observed by Kepler, can play a crucial role for studying stellar oscillations of different flavor with an unprecedented level of detail. A thorough study of stellar oscillations would thus allow for deeper testing of stellar structure models and new insights in stellar evolution theory. However, peak bagging inferences are in general very challenging problems due to the large number of observed oscillation modes, hence of free parameters that can be involved in the fitting models. Effciency and robustness in performing the analysis is what may be needed to proceed further. For this purpose, we developed a new code implementing the Nested Sampling Monte Carlo (NSMC) algorithm, a powerful statistical method well suited for Bayesian analyses of complex problems. In this talk we show the peak bagging of a sample of high signal-to-noise red giant stars by exploiting recent Kepler datasets and a new criterion for the detection of an oscillation mode based on the computation of the Bayesian evidence. Preliminary results for frequencies and lifetimes for single oscillation modes, together with acoustic glitches, are therefore presented.
  • We present the variability processing and analysis that is foreseen for the Gaia mission within Coordination Unit 7 (CU7) of the Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC). A top level description of the tasks is given.
  • We present the first APOKASC catalog of spectroscopic and asteroseismic properties of 1916 red giants observed in the Kepler fields. The spectroscopic parameters provided from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment project are complemented with asteroseismic surface gravities, masses, radii, and mean densities determined by members of the Kepler Asteroseismology Science Consortium. We assess both random and systematic sources of error and include a discussion of sample selection for giants in the Kepler fields. Total uncertainties in the main catalog properties are of order 80 K in Teff , 0.06 dex in [M/H], 0.014 dex in log g, and 12% and 5% in mass and radius, respectively; these reflect a combination of systematic and random errors. Asteroseismic surface gravities are substantially more precise and accurate than spectroscopic ones, and we find good agreement between their mean values and the calibrated spectroscopic surface gravities. There are, however, systematic underlying trends with Teff and log g. Our effective temperature scale is between 0-200 K cooler than that expected from the Infrared Flux Method, depending on the adopted extinction map, which provides evidence for a lower value on average than that inferred for the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). We find a reasonable correspondence between the photometric KIC and spectroscopic APOKASC metallicity scales, with increased dispersion in KIC metallicities as the absolute metal abundance decreases, and offsets in Teff and log g consistent with those derived in the literature. We present mean fitting relations between APOKASC and KIC observables and discuss future prospects, strengths, and limitations of the catalog data.
  • To exploit the full potential of Kepler light curves, sophisticated and robust analysis tools are now required more than ever. Characterizing single stars with an unprecedented level of accuracy and subsequently analyzing stellar populations in detail are fundamental to further constrain stellar structure and evolutionary models. We developed a new code, termed Diamonds, for Bayesian parameter estimation and model comparison by means of the nested sampling Monte Carlo (NSMC) algorithm, an efficient and powerful method very suitable for high-dimensional and multi-modal problems. A detailed description of the features implemented in the code is given with a focus on the novelties and differences with respect to other existing methods based on NSMC. Diamonds is then tested on the bright F8 V star KIC~9139163, a challenging target for peak-bagging analysis due to its large number of oscillation peaks observed, which are coupled to the blending that occurs between $\ell=2,0$ peaks, and the strong stellar background signal. We further strain the performance of the approach by adopting a 1147.5 days-long Kepler light curve. The Diamonds code is able to provide robust results for the peak-bagging analysis of KIC~9139163. We test the detection of different astrophysical backgrounds in the star and provide a criterion based on the Bayesian evidence for assessing the peak significance of the detected oscillations in detail. We present results for 59 individual oscillation frequencies, amplitudes and linewidths and provide a detailed comparison to the existing values in the literature. Lastly, we successfully demonstrate an innovative approach to peak bagging that exploits the capability of Diamonds to sample multi-modal distributions, which is of great potential for possible future automatization of the analysis technique.
  • Understanding the structure, formation and evolution of the Galactic Bulge requires the proper determination of spatial metallicity gradients in both the radial and vertical directions. RR Lyrae pulsators, known to be excellent distance indicators, may hold the key to determining these gradients. Jurcsik & Kovacs (1996) has shown that RR Lyrae light curves and the phase difference of their Fourier decomposition, {\phi}31, can be used to estimate photometric metallicities. The existence of galactic bulge metallicity gradients is a currently debated topic that would help pinpoint the Galaxy's formation and evolution. A recent study of the OGLE-III Galactic Bulge RR Lyrae Population by Pietrukowicz et al. (2012) suggests that the spatial distribution is uniform. We investigate how small a gradient would be detectable within the current S/N levels of the present data set, given the random and systematic errors associated with the derivation of a photometric metallicity versus spatial position relationship.
  • Our goal is to perform in-depth ensemble asteroseismology of the young open cluster NGC2244 with the 2-wheel Kepler mission. While the nominal Kepler mission already implied a revolution in stellar physics for solar-type stars and red giants, it was not possible to perform asteroseismic studies of massive OB stars because such targets were carefully avoided in the FoV in order not to disturb the exoplanet hunting. Now is an excellent time to fill this hole in mission capacity and to focus on the metal factories of the Universe, for which stellar evolution theory is least adequate. Our white paper aims to remedy major shortcomings in the theory of stellar structure and evolution of the most massive stars by focusing on a large ensemble of stars in a carefully selected young open cluster. Cluster asteroseismology of very young stars such as those of NGC2244 has the major advantage that all cluster stars have similar age, distance and initial chemical composition, implying drastic restrictions for the stellar modeling compared to asteroseismology of single isolated stars with very different ages and metallicities. Our study requires long-term photometric measurements of stars with visual magnitude ranging from 6.5 to 15 in a large FoV with a precision better than 30 ppm for the brightest cluster members (magnitude below 9) up to 500 ppm for the fainter ones, which is well achievable with 2-Wheel Kepler, in combination with high-precision high-resolution spectroscopy and spectro-polarimetry of the brightest pulsating cluster members. These ground-based spectroscopic data will be assembled with the HERMES and CORALIE spectrographs (twin 1.2m Mercator and Euler telescopes, La Palma, Canary Islands and La Silla, Chile), as well as with the spectro-polarimetric NARVAL instrument (2m BLT at the Pic du Midi, French Pyrenees), to which we have guaranteed access.
  • When the core hydrogen is exhausted during stellar evolution, the central region of a star contracts and the outer envelope expands and cools, giving rise to a red giant, in which convection occupies a large fraction of the star. Conservation of angular momentum requires that the cores of these stars rotate faster than their envelopes, and indirect evidence supports this. Information about the angular momentum distribution is inaccessible to direct observations, but it can be extracted from the effect of rotation on oscillation modes that probe the stellar interior. Here, we report the detection of non-rigid rotation in the interiors of red-giant stars by exploiting the rotational frequency splitting of recently detected mixed modes. We demonstrate an increasing rotation rate from the surface of the star to the stellar core. Comparing with theoretical stellar models, we conclude that the core must rotate at least ten times faster than the surface. This observational result confirms the theoretical prediction of a steep gradient in the rotation profile towards the deep stellar interior.
  • The space missions CoRoT and Kepler provide us with large samples of red giant stars wherein non-radial solar-like oscillations can be detected. This leads to the exciting opportunity to do population seismology. In this paper we give a short overview of some relevant technical aspects of the two satellites, we list and comment on some important target selection biases relevant for population seismology, and we make a case to use kernel density estimates as an alternative for histograms to characterize population characteristics
  • Red giants are evolved stars that have exhausted the supply of hydrogen in their cores and instead burn hydrogen in a surrounding shell. Once a red giant is sufficiently evolved, the helium in the core also undergoes fusion. Outstanding issues in our understanding of red giants include uncertainties in the amount of mass lost at the surface before helium ignition and the amount of internal mixing from rotation and other processes. Progress is hampered by our inability to distinguish between red giants burning helium in the core and those still only burning hydrogen in a shell. Asteroseismology offers a way forward, being a powerful tool for probing the internal structures of stars using their natural oscillation frequencies. Here we report observations of gravity-mode period spacings in red giants that permit a distinction between evolutionary stages to be made. We use high-precision photometry obtained with the Kepler spacecraft over more than a year to measure oscillations in several hundred red giants. We find many stars whose dipole modes show sequences with approximately regular period spacings. These stars fall into two clear groups, allowing us to distinguish unambiguously between hydrogen-shell-burning stars (period spacing mostly about 50 seconds) and those that are also burning helium (period spacing about 100 to 300 seconds).
  • While the first binary post-AGB stars were serendipitously discovered, the distinct characteristics of their Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) allowed us to launch a more systematic search for binaries. We selected post-AGB objects which show a broad dust excess often starting already at H or K, pointing to the presence of a gravitationally bound dusty disc in the system. We started a very extensive multi-wavelength study of those systems and here we report on our radial velocity and photometric monitoring results for six stars of early F type, which are pulsators of small amplitude. To determine the radial velocity of low signal-to-noise time-series, we constructed dedicated auto-correlation masks. The radial velocity variations were subjected to detailed analysis to differentiate between pulsational variability and variability due to orbital motion. Finally orbital minimalisation was performed to constrain the orbital elements. All of the six objects are binaries, with orbital periods ranging from 120 to 1800 days. Five systems have non-circular orbits. The mass functions range from 0.004 to 0.57 solar mass and the companions are likely unevolved objects of (very) low initial mass. We argue that these binaries must have been subject to severe binary interaction when the primary was a cool supergiant. Although the origin of the circumstellar disc is not well understood, the disc is generally believed to be formed during this strong interaction phase. The eccentric orbits of these highly evolved objects remain poorly understood. With the measured orbits and mass functions we conclude that the circumbinary discs seem to have a major impact on the evolution of a significant fraction of binary systems.
  • The moment method is a well known mode identification technique in asteroseismology (where `mode' is to be understood in an astronomical rather than in a statistical sense), which uses a time series of the first 3 moments of a spectral line to estimate the discrete oscillation mode parameters l and m. The method, contrary to many other mode identification techniques, also provides estimates of other important continuous parameters such as the inclination angle alpha, and the rotational velocity v_e. We developed a statistical formalism for the moment method based on so-called generalized estimating equations (GEE). This formalism allows the estimation of the uncertainty of the continuous parameters taking into account that the different moments of a line profile are correlated and that the uncertainty of the observed moments also depends on the model parameters. Furthermore, we set up a procedure to take into account the mode uncertainty, i.e., the fact that often several modes (l,m) can adequately describe the data. We also introduce a new lack of fit function which works at least as well as a previous discriminant function, and which in addition allows us to identify the sign of the azimuthal order m. We applied our method to the star HD181558, using several numerical methods, from which we learned that numerically solving the estimating equations is an intensive task. We report on the numerical results, from which we gain insight in the statistical uncertainties of the physical parameters involved in the moment method.