• We present 888 visual-wavelength spectra of 122 nearby type II supernovae (SNe II) obtained between 1986 and 2009, and ranging between 3 and 363 days post explosion. In this first paper, we outline our observations and data reduction techniques, together with a characterization based on the spectral diversity of SNe~II. A statistical analysis of the spectral matching technique is discussed as an alternative to non-detection constraints for estimating SN explosion epochs. The time evolution of spectral lines is presented and analysed in terms of how this differs for SNe of different photometric, spectral, and environmental properties: velocities, pseudo-equivalent widths, decline rates, magnitudes, time durations, and environment metallicity. Our sample displays a large range in ejecta expansion velocities, from $\sim9600$ to $\sim1500$ km s$^{-1}$ at 50 days post explosion with a median H$_{\alpha}$ value of 7300 km s$^{-1}$. This is most likely explained through differing explosion energies. Significant diversity is also observed in the absolute strength of spectral lines, characterised through their pseudo-equivalent widths. This implies significant diversity in both temperature evolution (linked to progenitor radius) and progenitor metallicity between different SNe~II. Around 60\% of our sample show an extra absorption component on the blue side of the H$_{\alpha}$ P-Cygni profile ("Cachito" feature) between 7 and 120 days since explosion. Studying the nature of Cachito, we conclude that these features at early times (before $\sim35$ days) are associated with \ion{Si}{2} $\lambda6355$, while past the middle of the plateau phase they are related to high velocity (HV) features of hydrogen lines.
  • We present a compilation of UBV RIz light curves of 51 type II supernovae discovered during the course of four different surveys during 1986 to 2003: the Cerro Tololo Supernova Survey, the Calan/Tololo Supernova Program (C&T), the Supernova Optical and Infrared Survey (SOIRS), and the Carnegie Type II Supernova Survey (CATS). The photometry is based on template-subtracted images to eliminate any potential host galaxy light contamination, and calibrated from foreground stars. This work presents these photometric data, studies the color evolution using different bands, and explores the relation between the magnitude at maximum brightness and the brightness decline parameter (s) from maximum light through the end of the recombination phase. This parameter is found to be shallower for redder bands and appears to have the best correlation in the B band. In addition, it also correlates with the plateau duration, being thus shorter (longer) for larger (smaller) s values.
  • We present well-sampled $UBVRIJHK$ photometry of SN 2002fk starting 12 days before maximum light through 122 days after peak brightness, along with a series of 15 optical spectra from -4 to +95 days since maximum. Our observations show the presence of C II lines in the early-time spectra of SN 2002fk, expanding at ~11,000 km s$^{-1}~$ and persisting until ~8 days past maximum light with a velocity of $\sim$9,000 km s$^{-1}~$. SN 2002fk is characterized by a small velocity gradient of $\dot v_{Si~II}=26$ km s$^{-1}$ day$^{-1}$, possibly caused by an off-center explosion with the ignition region oriented towards the observer. The connection between viewing angle of an off-center explosion and the presence of C II in the early time spectrum suggests that the observation of C II could be also due to a viewing angle effect. Adopting the Cepheid distance to NGC 1309 we provide the first $H_{0}$ value based on near-IR measurements of a Type Ia supernova between 63.0$\pm$ 0.8 ($\pm$ 2.8 systematic) and 66.7$\pm$1.0 ($\pm$ 3.5 systematic) km/s/Mpc, depending on the absolute magnitude/decline rate relationship adopted. It appears that the near-IR yields somewhat lower (6-9 %) $H_0$ values than the optical. It is essential to further examine this issue by (1) expanding the sample of high-quality near-IR light curves of SNe in the Hubble flow, and (2) increasing the number of nearby SNe with near-IR SN light curves and precise Cepheid distances, which affords the promise to deliver a more precise determination of $H_0$.
  • We present an analysis of the diversity of V-band light-curves of hydrogen-rich type II supernovae. Analyzing a sample of 116 supernovae, several magnitude measurements are defined, together with decline rates at different epochs, and time durations of different phases. It is found that magnitudes measured at maximum light correlate more strongly with decline rates than those measured at other epochs: brighter supernovae at maximum generally have faster declining light-curves at all epochs. We find a relation between the decline rate during the 'plateau' phase and peak magnitudes, which has a dispersion of 0.56 magnitudes, offering the prospect of using type II supernovae as purely photometric distance indicators. Our analysis suggests that the type II population spans a continuum from low-luminosity events which have flat light-curves during the 'plateau' stage, through to the brightest events which decline much faster. A large range in optically thick phase durations is observed, implying a range in progenitor envelope masses at the epoch of explosion. During the radioactive tails, we find many supernovae with faster declining light-curves than expected from full trapping of radioactive emission, implying low mass ejecta. It is suggested that the main driver of light-curve diversity is the extent of hydrogen envelopes retained before explosion. Finally, a new classification scheme is introduced where hydrogen-rich events are typed as simply 'SNII' with an s2 value giving the decline rate during the 'plateau' phase, indicating its morphological type.
  • This is the first release of optical spectroscopic data of low-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) by the Carnegie Supernova Project including 604 previously unpublished spectra of 93 SNe Ia. The observations cover a range of phases from 12 days before to over 150 days after the time of B-band maximum light. With the addition of 228 near-maximum spectra from the literature we study the diversity among SNe Ia in a quantitative manner. For that purpose, spectroscopic parameters are employed such as expansion velocities from spectral line blueshifts, and pseudo-equivalent widths (pW). The values of those parameters at maximum light are obtained for 78 objects, thus providing a characterization of SNe Ia that may help to improve our understanding of the properties of the exploding systems and the thermonuclear flame propagation. Two objects, namely SNe 2005M and 2006is, stand out from the sample by showing peculiar Si II and S II velocities but otherwise standard velocities for the rest of the ions. We further study the correlations between spectroscopic and photometric parameters such as light-curve decline rate and color. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the pW of Si II absorption features are very good indicators of light-curve decline rate. Furthermore, we demonstrate that parameters such as pW2(SiII4130) and pW6(SiII5972) provide precise calibrations of the peak B-band luminosity with dispersions of ~0.15 mag. In the search for a secondary parameter in the calibration of peak luminosity for SNe Ia, we find a ~2--3-sigma correlation between B-band Hubble residuals and the velocity at maximum light of S II and Si II lines.
  • Ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared photometry and optical spectroscopy of the broad-lined Type Ic supernova (SN) 2009bb are presented, following the flux evolution from -10 to +285 days past B-band maximum. Thanks to the very early discovery, it is possible to place tight constraints on the SN explosion epoch. The expansion velocities measured from near maximum spectra are found to be only slightly smaller than those measured from spectra of the prototype broad-lined SN 1998bw associated with GRB 980425. Fitting an analytical model to the pseudo-bolometric light curve of SN 2009bb suggests that 4.1+-1.9 Msun of material was ejected with 0.22 +-0.06 Msun of it being 56Ni. The resulting kinetic energy is 1.8+-0.7x10^52 erg. This, together with an absolute peak magnitude of MB=-18.36+-0.44, places SN 2009bb on the energetic and luminous end of the broad-lined Type Ic (SN Ic) sequence. Detection of helium in the early time optical spectra accompanied with strong radio emission, and high metallicity of its environment makes SN 2009bb a peculiar object. Similar to the case for GRBs, we find that the bulk explosion parameters of SN 2009bb cannot account for the copious energy coupled to relativistic ejecta, and conclude that another energy reservoir (a central engine) is required to power the radio emission. Nevertheless, the analysis of the SN 2009bb nebular spectrum suggests that the failed GRB detection is not imputable to a large angle between the line-of-sight and the GRB beamed radiation. Therefore, if a GRB was produced during the SN 2009bb explosion, it was below the threshold of the current generation of gamma-ray instruments.
  • We present a method for scheduling observations in small field-of-view transient targeted surveys. The method is based on maximizing the probability of detection of transient events of a given type and age since occurrence; it requires knowledge of the time since the last observation for every observed field, the expected light curve of the event, and the expected rate of events in the fields where the search is performed. In order to test this scheduling strategy we use a modified version of the genetic scheduler developed for the telescope control system RTS2. In particular, we present example schedules designed for a future 50 cm telescope that will expand the capabilities of the CHASE survey, which aims to detect young supernova events in nearby galaxies. We also include a brief description of the telescope and the status of the project, which is expected to enter a commissioning phase in 2010.
  • In this paper we study the "standardized candle method" using a sample of 37 nearby (z<0.06) Type II plateau supernovae having BVRI photometry and optical spectroscopy. An analytic procedure is implemented to fit light curves, color curves, and velocity curves. We find that the V-I color toward the end of the plateau can be used to estimate the host-galaxy reddening with a precision of 0.2 mag. The correlation between plateau luminosity and expansion velocity previously reported in the literature is recovered. Using this relation and assuming a standard reddening law (Rv = 3.1), we obtain Hubble diagrams in the BVI bands with dispersions of ~0.4 mag. Allowing Rv to vary and minimizing the spread in the Hubble diagrams, we obtain a dispersion range of 0.25-0.30 mag, which implies that these objects can deliver relative distances with precisions of 12-14%. The resulting best-fit value of Rv is 1.4 +/- 0.1.
  • Optical and near-infrared photometry and optical spectroscopy are reported for SN 2003bg, starting a few days after explosion and extending for a period of more than 300 days. Our early-time spectra reveal the presence of broad, high-velocity Balmer lines. The nebular-phase spectra, on the other hand, show a remarkable resemblance to those of Type Ib/c supernovae, without clear evidence for hydrogen. Near maximum brightness SN 2003bg displayed a bolometric luminosity comparable to that of other Type I hypernovae unrelated to gamma-ray bursts, implying a rather normal amount of 56Ni production (0.1-0.2 Msun) compared with other such objects. The bolometric light curve of SN 2003bg, on the other hand, is remarkably broad, thus suggesting a relatively large progenitor mass at the moment of explosion. These observations, together with the large value of the kinetic energy of expansion established in the accompanying paper (Mazzali et al. 2009), suggest that SN 2003bg can be regarded as a Type IIb hypernova.
  • We present a new K-selected, optical-to-near-infrared photometric catalog of the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS), making it publicly available to the astronomical community. The dataset is founded on publicly available imaging, supplemented by original zJK imaging data obtained as part of the MUltiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile (MUSYC). The final photometric catalog consists of photometry derived from nine band U-K imaging covering the full 0.5x0.5 sq. deg. of the ECDFS, plus H band data for approximately 80% of the field. The 5sigma flux limit for point-sources is K = 22.0 (AB). This is also the nominal completeness and reliability limit of the catalog: the empirical completeness for 21.75 < K < 22.00 is 85+%. We have verified the quality of the catalog through both internal consistency checks, and comparisons to other existing and publicly available catalogs. As well as the photometric catalog, we also present catalogs of photometric redshifts and restframe photometry derived from the ten band photometry. We have collected robust spectroscopic redshift determinations from published sources for 1966 galaxies in the catalog. Based on these sources, we have achieved a (1sigma) photometric redshift accuracy of Dz/(1+z) = 0.036, with an outlier fraction of 7.8%. Most of these outliers are X-ray sources. Finally, we describe and release a utility for interpolating restframe photometry from observed SEDs, dubbed InterRest. Particularly in concert with the wealth of already publicly available data in the ECDFS, this new MUSYC catalog provides an excellent resource for studying the changing properties of the massive galaxy population at z < 2. (Abridged)
  • We present spectra of six luminous quasars at z ~ 2, covering rest wavelengths 1600-3200 A. The fluxes of the UV Fe II emission lines and Mg II 2798 doublet, the line widths of Mg II, and the 3000 A luminosity were obtained from the spectra. These quantities were compared with those of low-redshift quasars at z = 0.06 - 0.55 studied by Tsuzuki et al. In a plot of the Fe II(UV)/Mg II flux ratio as a function of the cental black hole mass, Fe II(UV)/Mg II in our z ~ 2 quasars is systematically greater than in the low-redshift quasars. We confermed that luminosity is not responsible for this excess. It is unclear whether this excess is caused by rich Fe abundance at z ~ 2 over low-redshift or by non-abundance effects such as high gas density, strong radiation field, and high microturbulent velocity.
  • We study the clustering properties of K-selected galaxies at 2<z<3.5 using deep multiwavelength imaging in three fields from the MUSYC survey. These are the first measurements to probe the spatial correlation function of K-selected galaxies in this redshift range on large scales, allowing for robust conclusions about the dark matter halos that host these galaxies. K-selected galaxies with K<21 have a correlation length r_0 ~ 6 h^-1 Mpc, larger than typical values found for optically-selected galaxies. The correlation length does not depend on K-band magnitude, but it does increase strongly with color; the J-K>2.3 distant red galaxies (DRGs) have r_0 ~ 11 h^-1 Mpc. Contrary to findings for optically-selected galaxies, K-selected galaxies that are faint in the R-band cluster more strongly than brighter galaxies. These results suggest that a color-density relation was in place at z>2. Our results indicate that K-bright blue galaxies and K-bright red galaxies are fundamentally different, as they have different clustering properties. Using a simple model of one galaxy per halo, we infer halo masses ~ 5 x 10^12 M_sun for K<21 galaxies and ~ 2 x 10^13 M_sun for DRGs. A comparison of the observed space density of DRGs to the density of their host halos suggests large halo occupation numbers; however, this result is at odds with the lack of a strong small-scale excess in the angular correlation function. We find that the z=0 descendants of the galaxies considered here reside primarily in groups and clusters. [abridged]
  • We present deep near-infrared JHK imaging of four 10'x10' fields. The observations were carried out as part of the Multiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile (MUSYC) with ISPI on the CTIO 4m telescope. The typical point source limiting depths are J~22.5, H~21.5, and K~21 (5sigma; Vega). The effective seeing in the final images is ~1.0". We combine these data with MUSYC UBVRIz imaging to create K-selected catalogs that are unique for their uniform size, depth, filter coverage, and image quality. We investigate the rest-frame optical colors and photometric redshifts of galaxies that are selected using common color selection techniques, including distant red galaxies (DRGs), star-forming and passive BzKs, and the rest-frame UV-selected BM, BX, and Lyman break galaxies (LBGs). These techniques are effective at isolating large samples of high redshift galaxies, but none provide complete or uniform samples across the targeted redshift ranges. The DRG and BM/BX/LBG criteria identify populations of red and blue galaxies, respectively, as they were designed to do. The star-forming BzKs have a very wide redshift distribution, a wide range of colors, and may include galaxies with very low specific star formation rates. In comparison, the passive BzKs are fewer in number, have a different distribution of K magnitudes, and have a somewhat different redshift distribution. By combining these color selection criteria, it appears possible to define a reasonably complete sample of galaxies to our flux limit over specific redshift ranges. However, the redshift dependence of both the completeness and sampled range of rest-frame colors poses an ultimate limit to the usefulness of these techniques.
  • We selected 40 candidate Lyman Alpha Emitting galaxies (LAEs) at z ~=3.1 with observed frame equivalent widths >150A and inferred emission line fluxes >2.5x10^-17 ergs/cm^2/s from deep narrow-band and broad-band MUSYC images of the Extended Chandra Deep Field South. Covering 992 sq. arcmin, this is the largest ``blank field'' surveyed for LAEs at z ~3, allowing an improved estimate of the space density of this population of 3+-1x10^-4 h_70^3/Mpc^3. Spectroscopic follow-up of 23 candidates yielded 18 redshifts, all at z ~=3.1. Over 80% of the LAEs are dimmer in continuum magnitude than the typical Lyman break galaxy spectroscopic limit of R= 25.5 (AB), with a median continuum magnitude R ~=27 and very blue continuum colors, (V-z) ~=0. Over 80% of the LAEs have the right UVR colors to be selected as Lyman break galaxies, but only 10% also have R<=25.5. Stacking the UBVRIzJK fluxes reveals that LAEs have stellar masses ~=5x10^8 h_70^-2 M_sun and minimal dust extinction, A_V < ~ 0.1. Inferred star formation rates are ~=6 h_70^-2 M_sun/yr, yielding a cosmic star formation rate density of 2x10^-3 h_70 M_sun/yr/Mpc^3. None of our LAE candidates show evidence for rest-frame emission line equivalent widths EW_rest>240A which might imply a non-standard IMF. One candidate is detected by Chandra, implying an AGN fraction of 2+-2% for LAE candidate samples. In summary, LAEs at z ~ 3 have rapid star formation, low stellar mass, little dust obscuration and no evidence for a substantial AGN component.
  • Supernovae are essential to understanding the chemical evolution of the Universe. Type Ia supernovae also provide the most powerful observational tool currently available for studying the expansion history of the Universe and the nature of dark energy. Our basic knowledge of supernovae comes from the study of their photometric and spectroscopic properties. However, the presently available data sets of optical and near-infrared light curves of supernovae are rather small and/or heterogeneous, and employ photometric systems that are poorly characterized. Similarly, there are relatively few supernovae whose spectral evolution has been well sampled, both in wavelength and phase, with precise spectrophotometric observations. The low-redshift portion of the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP) seeks to remedy this situation by providing photometry and spectrophotometry of a large sample of supernovae taken on telescope/filter/detector systems that are well understood and well characterized. During a five-year program which began in September 2004, we expect to obtain high-precision u'g'r'i'BVYJHKs light curves and optical spectrophotometry for about 250 supernovae of all types. In this paper we provide a detailed description of the CSP survey observing and data reduction methodology. In addition, we present preliminary photometry and spectra obtained for a few representative supernovae during the first observing campaign.
  • We present Spitzer 24micron imaging of 1.5 < z < 2.5 Distant Red Galaxies (DRGs) in the 10arcmin by 10arcmin Extended Hubble Deep Field South of the Multiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile. We detect 65% of the DRGs with K_AB < 23.2 mag at S_24micron > 40uJy, and conclude that the bulk of the DRG population are dusty active galaxies. A mid-infrared (MIR) color analysis with IRAC data suggests that the MIR fluxes are not dominated by buried AGN, and we interpret the high detection rate as evidence for a high average star formation rate of <SFR> = 130+/-30 M/yr. From this, we infer that DRGs are important contributors to the cosmic star formation rate density at z ~ 2, at a level of \~0.02 M/yr/Mpc^3 to our completeness limit of K_AB = 22.9 mag
  • We present near infrared photometry of the Type Ia supernova 1999ee; also, optical and infrared photometry of the Type Ia SNe 2000bh, 2000ca, and 2001ba. For SNe 1999ee and 2000bh we present the first-ever SN photometry at 1.035 microns (the Y-band). We present K-corrections which transform the infrared photometry in the observer's frame to the supernova rest frame. Using our infrared K-corrections and stretch factors derived from optical photometry, we construct JHK templates which can be used to determine the apparent magnitudes at maximum if one has some data in the window -12 to +10 d with respect to T(B_max). Following up previous work on the uniformity of V minus IR loci of Type Ia supernovae of mid-range decline rates, we present unreddened loci for slow decliners. We also discuss evidence for a continuous change of color at a given epoch as a function of decline rate.
  • We present the results of a study of the host galaxies of high redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). We provide a catalog of 18 hosts of SNe Ia observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) by the High-z Supernova Search Team (HZT), including images, scale-lengths, measurements of integrated (Hubble equivalent) BVRIZ photometry in bands where the galaxies are brighter than m ~ 25 mag, and galactocentric distances of the supernovae. We compare the residuals of SN Ia distance measurements from cosmological fits to measurable properties of the supernova host galaxies that might be expected to correlate with variable properties of the progenitor population, such as host galaxy color and position of the supernova. We find mostly null results; the current data are generally consistent with no correlations of the distance residuals with host galaxy properties in the redshift range 0.42 < z < 1.06. Although a subsample of SN hosts shows a formally significant (3-sigma) correlation between apparent V-R host color and distance residuals, the correlation is not consistent with the null results from other host colors probed by our largest samples. There is also evidence for the same correlations between SN Ia properties and host type at low redshift and high redshift. These similarities support the current practice of extrapolating properties of the nearby population to high redshifts pending more robust detections of any correlations between distance residuals from cosmological fits and host properties.
  • A type Ia supernova (SN Ia), one of the two main classes of exploding stars, is recognized by the absence of hydrogen and the presence of elements such as silicon and sulphur in its spectra. These explosions are thought to produce the majority of iron-peak elements in the universe and are known to be precise "standard candles" used to measure distances to galaxies. While there is general agreement that SNe Ia are exploding white dwarfs, astronomers face the embarassing problem that the progenitor systems have never been directly observed. Significant effort has been put into the detection of circum-stellar material (CSM) in order to discriminate between the different types of possible progenitors systems, yet no CSM has been found. Here we report optical observations of SN 2002ic which reveal large amounts of CSM seen as a strong hydrogen emission. This observation suggests that the progenitor system contained a massive asymptotic branch giant star which lost a few solar masses of hydrogen-rich gas prior to the type Ia explosion.
  • We present optical and infrared spectra of SN 1999ex that reveal a clear example of an intermediate Type Ib/c case. This suggests a continuous spectroscopic sequence between Type Ib and Type Ic supernovae. We report UBVRIz photometric observations of SN 1999ex that started only one day after explosion, which permitted us to witness an elusive transient cooling phase that lasted 4 days. The initial cooling and subsequent radioactive heating produced a dip in the lightcurve which is consistent with explosion models involving core collapse of evolved massive helium stars, and inconsistent with lightcurves resulting from the thermonuclear runaway of compact white dwarfs.
  • We report optical and infrared spectroscopic observations of the Type Ia SN 1999ee and the Type Ib/c SN 1999ex, both of which were hosted by the galaxy IC 5179. For SN 1999ee we obtained a continuous sequence with an unprecedented wavelength and temporal coverage beginning 9 days before maximum light and extending through day 42. Before maximum light SN 1999ee displayed a normal spectrum with a strong Si II 6355 absorption, thus showing that not all slow-declining SNe are spectroscopically peculiar at these evolutionary phases. A comparative study of the infrared spectra of SN 1999ee and other Type Ia supernovae shows that there is a remarkable homogeneity among the Branch-normal SNe Ia during their first 60 days of evolution. SN 1991bg-like objects, on the other hand, display spectroscopic peculiarities at infrared wavelengths. SN 1999ex was characterized by the lack of hydrogen lines, weak optical He I lines, and strong He I 10830,20581, thus providing an example of an intermediate case between pure Ib and Ic supernovae. We conclude therefore that SN 1999ex provides first clear evidence for a link between the Ib and Ic classes and that there is a continuous spectroscopic sequence ranging from the He deficient SNe Ic to the SNe Ib which are characterized by strong optical He I lines.
  • We present spectroscopic observations of object CE-315 revealing a blue continuum with strong emission lines. Most of the detected lines are identified with He I or He II in emission with a handful of faint lines of nitrogen. Notable is the complete absence of hydrogen lines. The He lines exhibit triple-peaked profiles with remakably broad widths, of about 2000 km/s (FWZP). The observations show that CE-315 is an interacting binary system with an orbital period of 65.1 +/- 0.7 minutes, and a mass ratio of 0.022. We conclude that the most likely scenario for this object is that of an accreting 0.77 solar mass white dwarf with a 0.017 solar mass helium white dwarf as mass donor.
  • In the course of a Cycle 8 snapshot survey, we have discovered that the z=1.565 quasar HE 0512-3329 is a double with image separation 0.644", almost certainly due to gravitational lensing. The two components differ in brightness by only 0.4 magnitudes and a high signal-to-noise ground-based composite optical spectrum shows no trace of any stellar features at zero redshift, essentially ruling out the possibility that one of the two components is an ordinary Galactic star. The optical spectrum shows strong absorption features of MgII, MgI, FeII, FeI, and CaI, all at an identical intervening redshift of z=0.9313, probably due to the lensing object. The strength of the MgII and the presence of the other low ionization absorption features is strong evidence for a damped Lyman alpha system, likely the disk of a spiral galaxy. Point spread function fitting to remove the two quasar components from the STIS image leads to a tentative detection of a third object which may be the nucleus of the lensing galaxy. The brighter component is significantly redder than the fainter, due to either differential extinction or microlensing.
  • We report the discovery of the new double quasar CTQ 839. This B = 18.3, radio quiet quasar pair is separated by 2.1" in BRIH filters with magnitude differences of delta m_B = 2.5, delta m_R = delta m_I = 1.9, and delta m_H = 2.3. Spectral observations reveal both components to be z = 2.24 quasars, with relative redshifts that agree at the 100 km/s level, but exhibit pronounced differences in the equivalent widths of related emission features, as well as an enhancement of blue continuum flux in the brighter component longward of the Ly alpha emission feature. In general, similar redshift double quasars can be the result of a physical binary pair, or a single quasar multiply imaged by gravitational lensing. Empirical PSF subtraction of R and H band images of CTQ 839 reveal no indication of a lensing galaxy, and place a detection limit of R = 22.5 and H = 17.4 for a third component in the system. For an Einstein-de Sitter cosmology and SIS model, the R band detection limit constrains the characteristics of any lensing galaxy to z_lens >= 1 with a corresponding luminosity of L >~ 5 L_*, while an analysis based on the redshift probability distribution for the lensing galaxy argues against the existence of a z_lens >~ 1 lens at the 2 sigma level. A similar analysis for a Lambda dominated cosmology, however, does not significantly constrain the existence of any lensing galaxy. The broadband flux differences, spectral dissimilarities, and failure to detect a lensing galaxy make the lensing hypothesis for CTQ 839 unlikely. The similar redshifts of the two components would then argue for a physical quasar binary. At a projected separation of 8.3/h kpc (Omega_matter = 1), CTQ 839 would be the smallest projected separation binary quasar currently known.
  • A study is presented of the central structure and kinematics of the galaxy NGC 6951, by means of broad band B'IJK images and high resolution high dispersion longslit spectroscopy, together with archival HST WFPC2 V and NICMOS2 J and H images. We find that there is evidence of two modes of star formation, in bursts and continuously. The equivalent width of the CaII triplet absorption lines show that, in the metal rich central region, the continuum is dominated by a population of red supergiants. The gaseous and stellar kinematics along three slit position angles, suggest the existence of a hierarchy of disks within disks, whose dynamics are decoupled at the two ILRs, that we find at 180 pc and at 1100 pc. This is supported by the structure seen in the high resolution HST images. The nucleus is spatially resolved within a radius of 1.5 arcsec, just inside the innermost ILR. Outside the iILR, the stellar CaT velocity profile is resolved into two components, associated with the bar and the disk. Several results indicate that this is a dynamically old system. It is thus possible that a nuclear bar has existed in NGC 6951 that drove the gas towards the nucleus, as in the bars within bars scenario, but that this bar has already dissolved by the gas accumulated within the circumnuclear region. We discuss the possibility that the kinematical component inside the iILR could be due to a nuclear outflow produced by the combined effects of SN and SN remnants, or to a nuclear disk, as in the disk within disk scenario that we propose for the fueling of the AGN in NGC 6951.