• Gravitational waves can be focussed by the gravity of an intervening galaxy, just like light, thereby magnifying binary merging events in the far Universe. High magnification by galaxies is found to be responsible for the brightest sources detected in sky surveys, but the low angular resolution of LIGO/Virgo is insufficient to check this lensing possibility directly. Here we find that the first six binary black hole (BBH) merging events reported by LIGO/Virgo show clear evidence for lensing in the plane of observed mass and source distance. The four lowest frequency events follow an apparent locus in this plane, which we can reproduce by galaxy lensing, where the higher the magnification, the generally more distant the source so the wave train is stretched more by the Universal expansion, by factors of 2-4. This revises the reported BBH distances upwards by an order of magnitude, equal to the square root of the magnification. Furthermore, the reported black hole masses must be decreased by 2-4 to counter the larger stretch factor, since the orbital frequency is used to derive the black hole masses. This lowers the masses to 5-15 solar masses, well below the puzzlingly high values of 20-35 solar masses otherwise estimated, with the attraction of finding agreement in mass with black holes orbiting stars in our own Galaxy, thereby implying a stellar origin for the low frequency events in the far Universe. We also show that the other two BBH events of higher frequency detected by LIGO/VIRGO, lie well below the lensing locus, consistent with being nearby and unlensed. If this apparent division between local and distant lensed events is reinforced by new detections then the spins and masses of stellar black holes can be compared over a timespan of 10 billion years by LIGO/Virgo.
  • Galaxy-cluster gravitational lenses can magnify background galaxies by a total factor of up to ~50. Here we report an image of an individual star at redshift z=1.49 (dubbed "MACS J1149 Lensed Star 1 (LS1)") magnified by >2000. A separate image, detected briefly 0.26 arcseconds from LS1, is likely a counterimage of the first star demagnified for multiple years by a >~3 solar-mass object in the cluster. For reasonable assumptions about the lensing system, microlensing fluctuations in the stars' light curves can yield evidence about the mass function of intracluster stars and compact objects, including binary fractions and specific stellar evolution and supernova models. Dark-matter subhalos or massive compact objects may help to account for the two images' long-term brightness ratio.
  • A galaxy cluster acts as a cosmic telescope over background galaxies but also as a cosmic microscope of the lens imperfections. The diverging magnification of lensing caustics enhances the microlensing effect of substructure present within the lensing mass. Fine-scale structure can be accessed as a moving background source brightens and disappears when crossing these caustics. The recent recognition of a distant lensed star near the Einstein radius of the galaxy cluster MACSJ1149.5+2223 (Kelly et al. 2017) allows the rare opportunity to reach subsolar mass microlensing through a super-critical column of cluster matter. Here we compare these observations with high-resolution ray-tracing simulations that include stellar microlensing set by the observed intracluster starlight and also primordial black holes that may be responsible for the recently observed LIGO events. We explore different scenarios with microlenses from the intracluster medium and black holes, including primordial ones, and examine strategies to exploit these unique alignments. We find that the best constraints on the fraction of compact dark matter in the small-mass regime can be obtained in regions of the cluster where the intracluster medium plays a negligible role. This new lensing phenomenon should be widespread and can be detected within modest-redshift lensed galaxies so that the luminosity distance is not prohibitive for detecting individual magnified stars. Continuous {\it Hubble Space Telescope} monitoring of several such optimal arcs will be rewarded by an unprecedented mass spectrum of compact objects that can contribute to uncovering the nature of dark matter.
  • Intermediate-mass black holes are the missing link that connects supermassive and stellar-mass black holes and are key to understanding galaxy evolution. Gravitational waves, like photons, can be lensed by these objects. In the diffraction limit a gravitational wave can self interfere when bent by a mass of Schwarzschild radius comparable to its wavelength, modifying the observed waveform. The required point mass scale is $\sim 100-1000~\rm M_\odot$ for significant wave effect to occur for compact binaries in the LIGO band, corresponding to intermediate-mass black hole deflectors. We perform a mock data study using lensed gravitational waves to investigate detectability of these intermediate-mass black hole deflectors in the LIGO-Virgo detector network. In particular, we simulate gravitational waves with different source distributions lensed by an astrophysical population of intermediate-mass black holes and use standard LIGO tools to infer the properties of these lenses. We show that one can discover intermediate-mass black holes through their lensing effects on gravitational waves in the LIGO-Virgo detector network. Moreover, we demonstrate that one can detect intermediate-mass black holes at $\rm 98 \%$ confidence level in $\sim \rm 20 \%$ of the lensed cases, subject to the astrophysical lens population.
  • We summarize panchromatic Extragalactic Background Light data to place upper limits on the integrated near-infrared surface brightness (SB) that may come from Population III stars and possible accretion disks around their stellar-mass black holes (BHs) in the epoch of First Light, broadly taken from z$\simeq$7-17. Theoretical predictions and recent near-infrared power-spectra provide tighter constraints on their sky-signal. We outline the physical properties of zero metallicity Population III stars from MESA stellar evolution models through helium-depletion and of BH accretion disks at z$\gtrsim$7. We assume that second-generation non-zero metallicity stars can form at higher multiplicity, so that BH accretion disks may be fed by Roche-lobe overflow from lower-mass companions. We use these near-infrared SB constraints to calculate the number of caustic transits behind lensing clusters that the James Webb Space Telescope and the next generation ground-based telescopes may observe for both Population III stars and their BH accretion disks. Typical caustic magnifications can be $\mu$$\simeq$10$^4$-10$^5$, with rise times of hours and decline times of $\lesssim$1 year for cluster transverse velocities of $v_{T}$$\lesssim$1000 km s$^{-1}$. Microlensing by intracluster medium objects can modify transit magnifications, but lengthen visibility times. Depending on BH masses, accretion-disk radii and feeding efficiencies, stellar-mass BH accretion-disk caustic transits could outnumber those from Population III stars. To observe Population III caustic transits directly may require to monitor 3-30 lensing clusters to AB$\lesssim$29 mag over a decade.
  • The recent discovery of fast transient events near critical curves of massive galaxy clusters, which are interpreted as highly magnified individual stars in giant arcs due to caustic crossing, opens up the possibility of using such microlensing events to constrain a range of dark matter models such as primordial black holes and scalar field dark matter. Based on a simple analytic model, we study lensing properties of a point mass lens embedded in a high magnification region, and derive the dependence of the peak brightness, microlensing time scales, and event rates on the mass of the point mass lens as well as the radius of a source star that is magnified. We find that the lens mass and source radius of the first event MACS J1149 Lensed Star 1 (LS1) are constrained, with the lens mass range of $0.1~M_\odot \lesssim M \lesssim 4\times 10^3M_\odot$ and the source radius range of $40~R_\odot \lesssim R \lesssim 260~R_\odot$. In the most plausible case with $M\approx 0.3~M_\odot$ and $R\approx 180~R_\odot$, the source star should have been magnified by a factor of $\approx 4300$ at the peak. The derived lens properties are fully consistent with the interpretation that MACS J1149 LS1 is a microlensing event produced by a star that contributes to the intra-cluster light. We argue that compact dark matter models with high fractional mass densities for the mass range $10^{-5}M_\odot \lesssim M\lesssim 10^2M_\odot$ are inconsistent with the observation of MACS J1149 LS1 because such models predict too low magnifications. Our work demonstrates a potential use of caustic crossing events in giant arcs to constrain compact dark matter.
  • We present the results of a VLT MUSE/FORS2 and Spitzer survey of a unique compact lensing cluster CLIO at z = 0.42, discovered through the GAMA survey using spectroscopic redshifts. Compact and massive clusters such as this are understudied, but provide a unique prospective on dark matter distributions and for finding background lensed high-z galaxies. The CLIO cluster was identified for follow up observations due to its almost unique combination of high mass and dark matter halo concentration, as well as having observed lensing arcs from ground based images. Using dual band optical and infra-red imaging from FORS2 and Spitzer, in combination with MUSE optical spectroscopy we identify 89 cluster members and find background sources out to z = 6.49. We describe the physical state of this cluster, finding a strong correlation between environment and galaxy spectral type. Under the assumption of a NFW profile, we measure the total mass of CLIO to be M$_{200} = (4.49 \pm 0.25) \times 10^{14}$ M$_\odot$. We build and present an initial strong-lensing model for this cluster, and measure a relatively low intracluster light (ICL) fraction of 7.21 $\pm$ 1.53% through galaxy profile fitting. Due to its strong potential for lensing background galaxies and its low ICL, the CLIO cluster will be a target for our 110 hour JWST 'Webb Medium-Deep Field' (WMDF) GTO program.
  • We analyze the properties of a multiply-imaged Lyman-alpha (Lya) emitter at z=5.75 identified through SHARDS Frontier Fields intermediate-band imaging of the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) cluster Abell 370. The source, A370-L57, has low intrinsic luminosity (M_UV~-16.5), steep UV spectral index (\beta=-2.4+/-0.1), and extreme rest-frame equivalent width of Lya (EW(Lya)=420+180-120 \AA). Two different gravitational lens models predict high magnification (\mu~10--16) for the two detected counter-images, separated by 7", while a predicted third counter-image (\mu~3--4) is undetected. We find differences of ~50% in magnification between the two lens models, quantifying our current systematic uncertainties. Integral field spectroscopy of A370-L57 with MUSE shows a narrow (FWHM=204+/-10 km/s) and asymmetric Lya profile with an integrated luminosity L(Lya)~10^42 erg/s. The morphology in the HST bands comprises a compact clump (r_e<100 pc) that dominates the Lya and continuum emission and several fainter clumps at projected distances <1 kpc that coincide with an extension of the Lya emission in the SHARDS F823W17 and MUSE observations. The latter could be part of the same galaxy or an interacting companion. We find no evidence of contribution from AGN to the Lya emission. Fitting of the spectral energy distribution with stellar population models favors a very young (t<10 Myr), low mass (M*~10^6.5 Msun), and metal poor (Z<4x10^-3) stellar population. Its modest star formation rate (SFR~1.0 Msun/yr) implies high specific SFR (sSFR~2.5x10^-7 yr^-1) and SFR density (Sigma_SFR ~ 7-35 Msun/yr/kpc^2). The properties of A370-L57 make it a good representative of the population of galaxies responsible for cosmic reionization.
  • A multiply-lensed galaxy, MACS0647-JD, with a probable photometric redshift of $z\simeq 10.7^{+0.6}_{-0.4}$ is claimed to constitute one of the very earliest known galaxies, formed well before reionization was completed. However, spectral evidence that MACS0647-JD lies at high redshift has proven infeasible and so here we seek an independent lensing based "geometric redshift" derived from the angles between the three lensed images of MACS0647-JD, using our free-form mass model (WSLAP+) for the lensing cluster MACSJ0647.7+7015 (at $z=0.591$). Our lens model uses the 9 sets of multiple images, including those of MACS0647-JD, identified by the CLASH survey towards this cluster. We convincingly exclude the low redshift regime of $z<3$, for which convoluted critical curves are generated by our method, as the solution bends to accommodate the wide angles of MACS0647-JD for this low redshift. Instead, a best fit to all sets of lensed galaxy positions and redshifts provides a geometric redshift of $z\simeq 10.8^{+0.3}_{-0.4}$ for MACS0647-JD, strongly supporting the higher photometric redshift solution. Importantly, we find a tight linear relation between the relative brightnesses of all 9 sets of multiply lensed images and their relative magnifications as predicted by our model. This agreement provides a benchmark for the quality of the lens model, and establishes the robustness of our free-form lensing method for measuring model-independent geometric source distances and for deriving objective central cluster mass distributions. After correcting for its magnification the luminosity of MACS0647-JD remains relatively high at $M_{UV}=-19.4$, which is within a factor of a few in flux of some surprisingly luminous $z\simeq 10$--$11$ candidates discovered recently in Hubble black field surveys.
  • We derive a free-form mass distribution for the unrelaxed cluster A370 (z=0.375), using the latest Hubble Frontier Fields images and GLASS spectroscopy. Starting from a reliable set of 10 multiply lensed systems we produce a free-form lens model that identifies ~ 80 multiple-images. Good consistency is found between models using independent subsamples of these lensed systems, with detailed agreement for the well resolved arcs. The mass distribution has two very similar concentrations centred on the two prominent Brightest Cluster Galaxies (or BCGs), with mass profiles that are accurately constrained by a uniquely useful system of long radially lensed images centred on both BCGs. We show that the lensing mass profiles of these BCGs are mainly accounted for by their stellar mass profiles, with a modest contribution from dark matter within r<100 kpc of each BCG. This conclusion may favour a cooled cluster gas origin for BCGs, rather than via mergers of normal galaxies for which dark matter should dominate over stars. Growth via merging between BCGs is, however, consistent with this finding, so that stars still dominate over dark matter .
  • We derive a free-form mass distribution for the massive cluster AS1063 (z=0.348) using the completed optical imaging from the Hubble Frontier Fields programme. Based on a subset of 11 multiply lensed systems with spectroscopic redshift we produce a lens model that is accurate enough to unveil new multiply lensed systems, totalling over a 100 arclets, and to estimate their redshifts geometrically. Consistency is found between this precise model and that obtained using only the subset of lensed sources with spectroscopically measured redshifts. Although a relatively large elongation of the mass distribution is apparent relative to the X-ray map, no significant offset is found between the centroid of our mass distribution and that of the X-ray emission map, suggesting a relatively relaxed state for this cluster. For the well resolved lensed images we provide detailed model comparisons to illustrate the precision of our model and hence the reliability of our de-lensed sources. A clear linear structure is associated with one such source extending approx. 23 kpc in length, that could be an example of jet-induced star formation, at redshift z=3.1.
  • The massive cluster MACSJ1149.5+2223(z=0.544) displays five very large lensed images of a well resolved spiral galaxy at $z_{\rm spect}=1.491$. It is within one of these images that the first example of a multiply-lensed supernova has been detected recently as part of the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space. The depth of this data also reveals many HII regions within the lensed spiral galaxy which we identify between the five counter-images. Here we expand the capability of our free-form method to incorporate these HII regions locally, with other reliable lensed galaxies added for a global solution. This improved accuracy allows us to estimate when the Refsdal supernova will appear within the other lensed images of the spiral galaxy to an accuracy of $\sim$ 7\%. We predict this supernova will reappear in one of the counter-images (RA=11:49:36.025, DEC=+22:23:48.11, J2000) and on November 1$^{st}$ 2015 (with an estimated error of $\pm$ 25 days) it will be at the same phase as it was when it was originally discovered, offering a unique opportunity to study the early phases of this supernova and to examine the consistency of the mass model and the cosmological model that have an impact on the time delay prediction.
  • We searched for z > 7 Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) in the optical-to-mid-infrared Hubble Frontier Field and associated parallel field observations of the strong-lensing cluster MACS J0416-2403. We discovered 22 candidates, of which six lie at z > 9 and one lies at z > 10. Based on the Hubble and Spitzer photometry, all have secure photometric redshifts and a negligible probability of being at lower redshifts, according to their peak probability ratios, R. This substantial increase in the number of known high-redshift galaxies allows a solid determination of the luminosity function at z > 8. The number of high-z candidates in the parallel field is considerably higher than that in the Abell 2744 parallel field. Our candidates have median stellar masses of log(M_*) ~ 8.40^{+0.55}_{-0.31}~Msun, SFRs of ~ 1.6^{+0.5}_{-0.4} Msun yr^-1, and SFR-weighted ages of < 310^{+70}_{-140} Myr. Finally, we are able to put strong constraints on the z = 7,8,9 and 10 luminosity functions. One of the objects in the cluster field is a z ~ 10 candidate, with a magnification of mu ~ 20 +- 13. This object is likely the faintest z ~ 10 object known to date, allowing a first look into the extreme faint-end (L ~ 0.04L*) of the z ~ 10 luminosity function.
  • SN HFF14Tom is a Type Ia Supernova (SN) discovered at z = 1.3457 +- 0.0001 behind the galaxy cluster Abell 2744 (z = 0.308). In a cosmology-independent analysis, we find that HFF14Tom is 0.77 +- 0.15 magnitudes brighter than unlensed Type Ia SNe at similar redshift, implying a lensing magnification of mu_obs = 2.03 +- 0.29. This observed magnification provides a rare opportunity for a direct empirical test of galaxy cluster lens models. Here we test 17 lens models, 13 of which were generated before the SN magnification was known, qualifying as pure "blind tests". The models are collectively fairly accurate: 8 of the models deliver median magnifications that are consistent with the measured mu to within 1-sigma. However, there is a subtle systematic bias: the significant disagreements all involve models overpredicting the magnification. We evaluate possible causes for this mild bias, and find no single physical or methodological explanation to account for it. We do find that model accuracy can be improved to some extent with stringent quality cuts on multiply-imaged systems, such as requiring that a large fraction have spectroscopic redshifts. In addition to testing model accuracies as we have done here, Type Ia SN magnifications could also be used as inputs for future lens models of Abell 2744 and other clusters, providing valuable constraints in regions where traditional strong- and weak-lensing information is unavailable.
  • We perform a 3D multi-probe analysis of the rich galaxy cluster A1689 by combining improved weak-lensing data from new BVRi'z' Subaru/Suprime-Cam observations with strong-lensing, X-ray, and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) data sets. We reconstruct the projected matter distribution from a joint weak-lensing analysis of 2D shear and azimuthally integrated magnification constraints, the combination of which allows us to break the mass-sheet degeneracy. The resulting mass distribution reveals elongation with axis ratio ~0.7 in projection. When assuming a spherical halo, our full weak-lensing analysis yields a projected concentration of $c_{200c}^{2D}=8.9\pm 1.1$ ($c_{vir}^{2D}\sim 11$), consistent with and improved from earlier weak-lensing work. We find excellent consistency between weak and strong lensing in the region of overlap. In a parametric triaxial framework, we constrain the intrinsic structure and geometry of the matter and gas distributions, by combining weak/strong lensing and X-ray/SZE data with minimal geometric assumptions. We show that the data favor a triaxial geometry with minor-major axis ratio 0.39+/-0.15 and major axis closely aligned with the line of sight (22+/-10 deg). We obtain $M_{200c}=(1.2\pm 0.2)\times 10^{15} M_{\odot}/h$ and $c_{200c}=8.4\pm 1.3$, which overlaps with the $>1\sigma$ tail of the predicted distribution. The shape of the gas is rounder than the underlying matter but quite elongated with minor-major axis ratio 0.60+/-0.14. The gas mass fraction within 0.9Mpc is 10^{+3}_{-2}%. The thermal gas pressure contributes to ~60% of the equilibrium pressure, indicating a significant level of non-thermal pressure support. When compared to Planck's hydrostatic mass estimate, our lensing measurements yield a spherical mass ratio of $M_{Planck}/M_{GL}=0.70\pm 0.15$ and $0.58\pm 0.10$ with and without corrections for lensing projection effects, respectively.
  • We examine the latest data on the cluster MACSJ0717.5+3745 from the Hubble Frontier Fields campaign. The critically lensed area is the largest known of any lens and very irregular making it a challenge for parametric modelling. Using our Free-Form method we obtain an accurate solution, identify here many new sets of multiple images, doubling the number of constraints and improving the reconstruction of the dark matter distribution. Our reconstructed mass map shows several distinct central substructures with shallow density profiles, clarifying earlier work and defining well the relation between the dark matter distribution and the luminous and X-ray peaks within the critically lensed region. Using our free-form method, we are able to meaningfully subtract the mass contribution from cluster members to the deflection field to trace the smoothly distributed cluster dark matter distribution. We find 4 distinct concentrations, 3 of which are coincident with the luminous matter. The fourth peak has a significant offset from both the closest luminous and X-ray peaks. These findings, together with dynamical data from the motions of galaxies and gas will be important for uncovering the potentially important implications of this extremely massive and intriguing system.
  • Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) imaging of the most powerful lensing clusters provides access to the most magnified distant galaxies. The challenge is to construct lens models capable of describing these complex massive, merging clusters so that individual lensed systems can be reliably identified and their intrinsic properties accurately derived. We apply the free-form lensing method (WSLAP+) to A2744, providing a model independent map of the cluster mass, magnification, and geometric distance estimates to multiply-lensed sources. We solve simultaneously for a smooth cluster component on a pixel grid, together with local deflections by the cluster member galaxies. Combining model prediction with photometric redshift measurements, we correct and complete several systems recently claimed, and identify 4 new systems - totalling 65 images of 21 systems spanning a redshift range of 1.4<z<9.8. The reconstructed mass shows small enhancements in the directions where significant amounts of hot plasma can be seen in X-ray. We compare photometric redshifts with "geometric redshifts", finding a high level of self-consistency. We find excellent agreement between predicted and observed fluxes - with a best-fit slope of 0.999+-0.013 and an RMS of ~0.25 mag, demonstrating that our magnification correction of the lensed background galaxies is very reliable. Intriguingly, few multiply-lensed galaxies are detected beyond z~7.0, despite the high magnification and the limiting redshift of z~11.5 permitted by the HFF filters. With the additional HFF clusters we can better examine the plausibility of any pronounced high-z deficit, with potentially important implications for the reionization epoch and the nature of dark matter.
  • We examine a well resolved 8 arcsec lensed image that is symmetrically bent in the middle by an edge-on lenticular galaxy, in the Hubble Frontier Field (HFF) data of MACSJ0416.1-20403. The lengthy image is generated primarily by the large tangential shear of the cluster with a local secondary deflection by the member galaxy out to a limiting radius of about 18 kpc. The lensing lenticular galaxy is also well resolved and evidently lies nearly edge-on in projection. This fortuitous combination of a long arc intersecting an edge on galaxy provides us with an opportunity to place relatively strong constraints on the lensing effect of this galaxy. We can model the stellar lensing contribution using the observed pixels belonging to the galaxy, in 2D, and we add to this a standard parameterised dark halo component. Irrespective of the detailed choice of parameters we obtain a combined total mass of about 3E11 Msun. Depending on the dark halo parameters, the stellar contribution to this is limited to the range 5-15E10 Msun or 20-50 percent of the total mass, in good agreement with the independent stellar mass computed from the photometry of 5E10 Msun for a Chabrier IMF, or 8E10Msun for a Salpeter IMF. The major axis of the DM halo is constrained to be nearly orthogonal to the plane of the galaxy, within a range of about 15 degrees, and with an ellipticity e=015 corresponding to an axis ratio a/c=0.54. We show that these conclusions are very weakly dependent on the model of the cluster, or the additional influence of neighbouring galaxies or the properties of the lensed source. Alternative theories of gravity where the radial dependence is modified to avoid the need for DM are challenged by this finding since generically these must be tied to the baryonic component which here is a stellar disk oriented nearly orthogonally to the lensed image deflection.
  • The deflection angles of lensed sources increase with their distance behind a given lens. We utilize this geometric effect to corroborate the $z_{phot}\simeq9.8$ photometric redshift estimate of a faint near-IR dropout, triply-imaged by the massive galaxy cluster Abell 2744 in deep Hubble Frontier Fields images. The multiple images of this source follow the same symmetry as other nearby sets of multiple images which bracket the critical curves and have well defined redshifts (up to $z_{spec}\simeq3.6$), but with larger deflection angles, indicating that this source must lie at a higher redshift. Similarly, our different parametric and non-parametric lens models all require this object be at $z\gtrsim4$, with at least 95\% confidence, thoroughly excluding the possibility of lower-redshift interlopers. To study the properties of this source we correct the two brighter images for their magnifications, leading to a SFR of $\sim0.3 M_{\odot}$/yr, a stellar mass of $\sim4\times10^{7} M_{\odot}$, and an age of $\lesssim220$ Myr (95\% confidence). The intrinsic apparent magnitude is 29.9 AB (F160W), and the rest-frame UV ($\sim1500 \AA$) absolute magnitude is $M_{UV,AB}=-17.6$. This corresponds to $\sim0.1 L^{*}_{z=8}$ ($\sim0.2 L^{*}_{z=10}$, adopting $dM^{*}/dz\sim0.45$), making this candidate one of the least luminous galaxies discovered at $z\sim10$.
  • LensExplorer is an IDL GUI code that can be used to visualize the lensing deflection field derived in the Hubble Frontier Fields clusters. The code can be used for both, research and educational purposes as it offers and intuitive and user friendly way to explore the solutions in the different clusters. LensExplorer can be used to predict the magnifications at different redshifts of background sources and for a given location. We present in this document a quick guide to get started with LensExplorer. The code and lens models for the cluster A2744 and MACSJ0416.1-2403 are publicly available from this website http://www.ifca.unican.es/users/jdiego/LensExplorer/ where the new solutions (and new versions of the code) will be also uploaded as they become available.
  • We present a free form mass reconstruction of the massive lensing cluster MACSJ0416.1-2403 using the latest Hubble Frontier Fields data. Our model independent method finds that the extended lensing pattern is generated by two elongated, closely projected clusters of similar mass. Our lens model identifies new lensed images with which we improve the accuracy of the dark matter distribution. We find that the bimodal mass distribution is nearly coincident with the bimodal X-ray emission, but with the two dark matter peaks lying closer together than the centroids of the X-ray emisison. We show this can be achieved if the collision has occurred close to the plane and such that the cores are deflected around each other. The projected mass profiles of both clusters are well constrained because of the many interior lensed images, leading to surprisingly flat mass profiles of both components in the region 15-100 kpc. We discuss the extent to which this may be generated by tidal forces in our dynamical model which are large during an encounter of this type as the cores "graze" each other. The relative velocity between the two cores is estimated to be about 1200 km/s and mostly along the line of sight so that our model is consistent with the relative redshift difference between the two cD galaxies (dz = 0.04).
  • Hubble Space Telescope imaging of the galaxy cluster Abell 1689 has revealed an exceptional number of strongly lensed multiply-imaged galaxies, including high-redshift candidates. Previous studies have used this data to obtain the most detailed dark matter reconstructions of any galaxy cluster to date, resolving substructures ~25 kpc across. We examine Abell 1689 (hereafter, A1689) non-parametrically, combining strongly lensed images and weak distortions from wider field Subaru imaging, and we incorporate member galaxies to improve the lens solution. Strongly lensed galaxies are often locally affected by member galaxies, however, these perturbations cannot be recovered in grid based reconstructions because the lensing information is too sparse to resolve member galaxies. By adding luminosity-scaled member galaxy deflections to our smooth grid we can derive meaningful solutions with sufficient accuracy to permit the identification of our own strongly lensed images, so our model becomes self consistent. We identify 11 new multiply lensed system candidates and clarify previously ambiguous cases, in the deepest optical and NIR data to date from Hubble and Subaru. Our improved spatial resolution brings up new features not seen when the weak and strong lensing effects are used separately, including clumps and filamentary dark matter around the main halo. Our treatment means we can obtain an objective mass ratio between the cluster and galaxy components, for examining the extent of tidal stripping of the luminous member galaxies. We find a typical mass-to-light ratios of M/L_B = 21 inside the r<1 arcminute region that drops to M/L_B = 17 inside the r<40 arcsecond region. Our model independence means we can objectively evaluate the competitiveness of stacking cluster lenses for defining the geometric lensing-distance-redshift relation in a model independent way.
  • In the strong lensing regime non-parametric lens models struggle to achieve sufficient angular resolution for a meaningful derivation of the central cluster mass distribution. The problem lies mainly with cluster members which perturb lensed images and generate additional images, requiring high resolution modeling, even though we mainly wish to understand the relatively smooth cluster component. The required resolution is not achievable because the separation between lensed images is several times larger than the deflection angles by member galaxies, even for the deepest data. Here we bypass this limitation by incorporating a simple physical prior for member galaxies, using their observed positions and their luminosity scaled masses. This galaxy contribution is added to a relatively coarse Gaussian pixel grid for modeling the cluster mass distribution, extending our established WSLAP code (Diego et al. 2007). We test this new code with a simulation based on A1689, using the pixels belonging to multiply-lensed images and the observed member galaxies. Dealing with the cluster members this way leads to convergent solutions, without resorting to regularization, reproducing well the input cluster and substructures. We highlight the ability of this method to recover dark sub-components of the cluster, unrelated to member galaxies. Such anomalies can provide clues to the nature of invisible dark matter, but are hard to discover using parametrized models where substructures are defined by the visible data. With our increased resolution and stability we show, for the first time, that non-parametric models can be made sufficiently precise to locate multiply-lensed systems, thereby achieving fully self-consistent solutions without reliance on input systems from less objective means.
  • The Planck satellite has proved to be a very successful mission, which has been operating flawlessly for more than 36 months. Its main purpose is to map the anisotropies of the CMB radiation at 9 frequencies, between 30 and 857 GHz, with unprecedented resolution and sensitivity. After a description of the properties and cosmological aims of Planck, we review the results obtained during the first 1.6 full sky surveys relative to compact extragalactic sources and their implications. The most recent and efficient methods and filters for compact source detection in the presence of Gaussian noise and CMB anisotropies are discussed. The first surveys of Planck have enabled the detection of about 200 galaxy clusters, by the SZ effect, and from several hundreds to many thousands of extragalactic point sources (EPS), presented in the Planck ERCSC. We review the results on the SZ effect in galaxy clusters. We discuss the possibilities of future Planck data to study clusters through the SZ effect and the interesting possibilities of combining these data with X ray observations. These EPS can be classified into two main source classes: radio sources, at intermediate to high z; far IR sources, typically at very z. Planck number counts of EPS at LFI frequencies are in agreement with WMAP counts. A clear steepening of the mean spectral index of bright radio sources is observed above 70 GHz, that can be interpreted in terms of a break frequency in their spectra. For nearby dusty galaxies, Planck observations find evidence of colder dust, with T < 20 K, than has previously been found. More recently, the number counts of bright local dusty galaxies and of synchrotron sources have been measured by Planck at submm wavelengths. Planck has provided interesting results on the angular distribution of CIB anisotropies, allowing us to put new constraints on clustering properties of dusty galaxies at high z.
  • Asantha Cooray, Steve Eales, Scott Chapman, David L. Clements, Olivier Dore, Duncan Farrah, Matt J. Jarvis, Manoj Kaplinghat, Mattia Negrello, Alessandro Melchiorri, Hiranya Peiris, Alexandra Pope, Mario G. Santos, Stephen Serjeant, Mark Thompson, Glenn White, Alexandre Amblard, Manda Banerji, Pier-Stefano Corasaniti, Sudeep Das, Francesco de_Bernardis, Gianfranco de_Zotti, Tommaso Giannantonio, Joaquin Gonzalez-Nuevo Gonzalez, Ali Ahmad Khostovan, Ketron Mitchell-Wynne, Paolo Serra, Yong-Seon Song, Joaquin Vieira, Lingyu Wang, Michael Zemcov, Filipe Abdalla, Jose Afonso, Nabila Aghanim, Paola Andreani, Itziar Aretxaga, Robbie Auld, Maarten Baes, Andrew Baker, Denis Barkats, R. Belen Barreiro, Nicola Bartolo, Elizabeth Barton, Sudhanshu Barway, Elia Stefano Battistelli, Carlton Baugh, Alexander Beelen, Karim Benabed, Andrew Blain, Joss Bland-Hawthorn, James J. Bock, J. Richard Bond, Julian Borrill, Colin Borys, Alessandro Boselli, Francois R. Bouchet, Carrie Bridge, Fabrizio Brighenti, Veronique Buat, David Buote, Denis Burgarella, Robert Bussmann, Erminia Calabrese, Christopher Cantalupo, Raymond Carlberg, Carla Sofia Carvalho, Caitlin Casey, Antonio Cava, Jordi Cepa, Edward Chapin, Ranga Ram Chary, Xuelei Chen, Sergio Colafrancesco, Shaun Cole, Peter Coles, Alexander Conley, Luca Conversi, Jeff Cooke, Steven Crawford, Catherine Cress, Elisabete da Cunha, Gavin Dalton, Luigi Danese, Helmut Dannerbauer, Jonathan Davies, Paolo de Bernardis, Roland de Putter, Mark Devlin, Jose M. Diego, Herve Dole, Marian Douspis, Joanna Dunkley, James Dunlop, Loretta Dunne, Rolando Dunner, Simon Dye, George Efstathiou, Eiichi Egami, Taotao Fang, Patrizia Ferrero, Alberto Franceschini, Christopher C. Frazer, David Frayer, Carlos Frenk, Ken Ganga, Raphael Gavazzi, Jason Glenn, Yan Gong, Eduardo Gonzalez-Solares, Matt Griffin, Qi Guo, Mark Gurwell, Amir Hajian, Mark Halpern, Duncan Hanson, Martin Hardcastle, Evanthia Hatziminaoglou, Alan Heavens, Sebastien Heinis, Diego Herranz, Matt Hilton, Shirley Ho, Benne W. Holwerda, Rosalind Hopwood, Jonathan Horner, Kevin Huffenberger, David H. Hughes, John P. Hughes, Edo Ibar, Rob Ivison, Neal Jackson, Andrew Jaffe, Timothy Jenness, Gilles Joncas, Shahab Joudaki, Sugata Kaviraj, Sam Kim, Lindsay King, Theodore Kisner, Johan Knapen, Alexei Kniazev, Eiichiro Komatsu, Leon Koopmans, Chao-Lin Kuo, Cedric Lacey, Ofer Lahav, Anthony N. Lasenby, Andy Lawrence, Myung Gyoon Lee, Lerothodi L. Leeuw, Louis R. Levenson, Geraint Lewis, Nicola Loaring, Marcos Lopez-Caniego, Steve Maddox, Tobias Marriage, Gaelen Marsden, Enrique Martinez-Gonzalez, Silvia Masi, Sabino Matarrese, William G. Mathews, Shuji Matsuura, Richard McMahon, Yannick Mellier, Felipe Menanteau, Michal J. Michalowski, Marius Millea, Bahram Mobasher, Subhanjoy Mohanty, Ludovic Montier, Kavilan Moodley, Gerald H. Moriarty-Schieven, Angela Mortier, Dipak Munshi, Eric Murphy, Kirpal Nandra, Paolo Natoli, Hien Nguyen, Seb Oliver, Alain Omont, Lyman Page, Mathew Page, Roberta Paladini, Stefania Pandolfi, Enzo Pascale, Guillaume Patanchon, John Peacock, Chris Pearson, Ismael Perez-Fournon, Pablo G. Perez-Gonz, Francesco Piacentini, Elena Pierpaoli, Michael Pohlen, Etienne Pointecouteau, Gianluca Polenta, Jason Rawlings, Erik D. Reese, Emma Rigby, Giulia Rodighiero, Encarni Romero-Colmenero, Isaac Roseboom, Michael Rowan-Robinson, Miguel Sanchez-Portal, Fabian Schmidt, Michael Schneider, Bernhard Schulz, Douglas Scott, Chris Sedgwick, Neelima Sehgal, Nick Seymour, Blake D. Sherwin, Jo Short, David Shupe, Jonathan Sievers, Ramin Skibba, Joseph Smidt, Anthony Smith, Daniel J. B. Smith, Matthew W. L. Smith, David Spergel, Suzanne Staggs, Jason Stevens, Eric Switzer, Toshinobu Takagi, Tsutomu Takeuchi, Pasquale Temi, Markos Trichas, Corrado Trigilio, Katherine Tugwell, Grazia Umana, William Vacca, Mattia Vaccari, Petri Vaisanen, Ivan Valtchanov, Kurt van der Heyden, Paul P. van der Werf, Eelco van_Kampen, Ludovic van_Waerbeke, Simona Vegetti, Marcella Veneziani, Licia Verde, Aprajita Verma, Patricio Vielva, Marco P. Viero, Baltasar Vila Vilaro, Julie Wardlow, Grant Wilson, Edward L. Wright, C. Kevin Xu, Min S. Yun
    July 22, 2010 astro-ph.CO
    A large sub-mm survey with Herschel will enable many exciting science opportunities, especially in an era of wide-field optical and radio surveys and high resolution cosmic microwave background experiments. The Herschel-SPIRE Legacy Survey (HSLS), will lead to imaging data over 4000 sq. degrees at 250, 350, and 500 micron. Major Goals of HSLS are: (a) produce a catalog of 2.5 to 3 million galaxies down to 26, 27 and 33 mJy (50% completeness; 5 sigma confusion noise) at 250, 350 and 500 micron, respectively, in the southern hemisphere (3000 sq. degrees) and in an equatorial strip (1000 sq. degrees), areas which have extensive multi-wavelength coverage and are easily accessible from ALMA. Two thirds of the of the sources are expected to be at z > 1, one third at z > 2 and about a 1000 at z > 5. (b) Remove point source confusion in secondary anisotropy studies with Planck and ground-based CMB data. (c) Find at least 1200 strongly lensed bright sub-mm sources leading to a 2% test of general relativity. (d) Identify 200 proto-cluster regions at z of 2 and perform an unbiased study of the environmental dependence of star formation. (e) Perform an unbiased survey for star formation and dust at high Galactic latitude and make a census of debris disks and dust around AGB stars and white dwarfs.