• We investigate the potential of weak lensing by voids to test for deviations from General Relativity. We calculate the expected lensing signal of a scalar field with derivative couplings, finding that it has the potential to boost the tangential shear both within and outside the void radius. We use voids traced by Luminous Red Galaxies in SDSS to demonstrate the methodology of testing these predictions. We find that the void central density parameter, as inferred from the lensing signal, can shift from its GR value by up to 20% in some galileon gravity models. Since this parameter can be estimated independently using the galaxy tracer profiles of voids, our method provides a consistency check of the gravity theory. Although galileon gravity is now disfavoured as a source of cosmic acceleration by other datasets, the methods we demonstrate here can be used to test for more general fifth force effects with upcoming void lensing data.
  • We measure weak lensing mass profiles of voids from a volume-limited sample of SDSS Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs). We find voids using an algorithm designed to maximize the lensing signal by dividing the survey volume into 2D slices, and then finding holes in this 2D distribution of LRGs. We perform a stacked shear measurement on about 20,000 voids with radii between 15-55 Mpc/h and redshifts between 0.16-0.37. We measure the characteristic radial shear signal of voids with a signal-to-noise of 7. The mass profile corresponds to a fractional underdensity of about -0.4 inside the void radius and a slow approach to the mean density indicating a partially compensated void structure. We compare our measured shape and amplitude with the predictions of Krause et al 2013. Voids in the galaxy distribution have been extensively modeled using simulations and measured in the SDSS. We discuss how the addition of void mass profiles can enable studies of galaxy formation and cosmology.
  • We present a novel method to detect the effects of dynamical friction in observed galaxy clusters. Following accretion into clusters, massive satellite galaxies will backsplash to systematically smaller radii than less massive satellites, an effect that may be detected by stacking the number density profiles of galaxies around clusters. We show that this effect may be understood using a simple toy model which reproduces the trends with halo properties observed in simulations. We search for this effect using SDSS redMaPPer clusters with richness 10<lambda<20, and find that bright (M_i<-21.5) satellites have smaller splashback radii than fainter (M_i>-20) satellites at 99% confidence.
  • When dark matter halos are accreted by massive host clusters, strong gravitational tidal forces begin stripping mass from the accreted subhalos. This stripping eventually removes all mass beyond a subhalo's tidal radius, but the unbound mass remains in the vicinity of the satellite for at least a dynamical time t_dyn. The N-body subhalo study of Chamberlain et al. verified this picture and pointed out a useful observational consequence: measurements of subhalo correlations beyond the tidal radius are sensitive to the infall time, t_infall, of the subhalo onto its host. We perform this cross-correlation measurement using ~ 160,000 red satellite galaxies in SDSS redMaPPer clusters and find evidence that subhalo correlations do persist well beyond the tidal radius, suggesting that many of the observed satellites fell into their current host less than a dynamical time ago, t_infall < t_dyn. Combined with estimated dynamical times t_dyn ~ 3-5 Gyr and SED fitting results for the time at which satellites stopped forming stars, t_quench ~ 6 Gyr, we infer that for a significant fraction of the satellites, star formation quenched before those satellites entered their current hosts. The result holds for red satellites over a large range of cluster-centric distances 0.1 - 0.6 Mpc/h. We discuss the implications of this result for models of galaxy formation.
  • We present cosmological constraints from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) using a combined analysis of angular clustering of red galaxies and their cross-correlation with weak gravitational lensing of background galaxies. We use a 139 square degree contiguous patch of DES data from the Science Verification (SV) period of observations. Using large scale measurements, we constrain the matter density of the Universe as Omega_m = 0.31 +/- 0.09 and the clustering amplitude of the matter power spectrum as sigma_8 = 0.74 +/- 0.13 after marginalizing over seven nuisance parameters and three additional cosmological parameters. This translates into S_8 = sigma_8(Omega_m/0.3)^{0.16} = 0.74 +/- 0.12 for our fiducial lens redshift bin at 0.35 <z< 0.5, while S_8 = 0.78 +/- 0.09 using two bins over the range 0.2 <z< 0.5. We study the robustness of the results under changes in the data vectors, modelling and systematics treatment, including photometric redshift and shear calibration uncertainties, and find consistency in the derived cosmological parameters. We show that our results are consistent with previous cosmological analyses from DES and other data sets and conclude with a joint analysis of DES angular clustering and galaxy-galaxy lensing with Planck CMB data, Baryon Accoustic Oscillations and Supernova type Ia measurements.
  • Lensing measurements of the shapes of dark matter halos can provide tests of gravity theories and possible dark matter interactions. We measure the quadrupole weak lensing signal from the elliptical halos of 70,000 SDSS Luminous Red Galaxies. We use a new estimator that nulls the spherical halo lensing signal, isolating the shear due to anisotropy in the dark matter distribution. One of the two Cartesian components of our estimator is insensitive to the primary systematic, a spurious alignment of lens and source ellipticities, allowing us to make robust measurements of halo ellipticity. Our best-fit value for the ellipticity of the surface mass density is $0.24 \pm 0.06$, which translates to an axis ratio of 0.78. We rule out the hypothesis of no ellipticity at the $4\sigma$ confidence level, and ellipticity < 0.12 (axis ratio > 0.89) at the $2\sigma$ level. We discuss how our measurements of halo ellipticity are revised to higher values using estimates of the misalignment of mass and light from simulations. Finally, we apply the same techniques to a smaller sample of redMaPPer galaxy clusters and obtain a $3\sigma$ measurement of cluster ellipticity. We discuss how the improved signal to noise properties of our estimator can enable studies of halo shapes for different galaxy populations with upcoming surveys.
  • We search for the lensing signal of massive filaments between 135,000 pairs of Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We develop a new estimator that cleanly removes the much larger shear signal of the neighboring LRG halos, relying only on the assumption of spherical symmetry. We consider two models: a thick filament model constructed from ray-tracing simulations for $\Lambda$CDM model, and a thin filament model which models the filament by a string of halos along the line connecting the two LRGs. We show that the filament lensing signal is in nice agreement with the thick simulation filament, while strongly disfavoring the thin model. The magnitude of the lensing shear due to the filament is below $10^{-4}$. Employing the likelihood ratio test, we find a 4.5$\sigma$ significance for the detection of the filament lensing signal, corresponding to a null hypothesis fluctuation probability of $3 \times 10^{-6}$. We also carried out several null tests to verify that the residual shear signal from neighboring LRGs and other shear systematics are minimized.
  • Using a void catalog from the SDSS survey, we present the first measurements of void clustering and the corresponding void bias. Over the range 30-200 Mpc/h the void auto-correlation is detected at 5-sigma significance for voids of radius 15-20 Mpc/h. We also measure the void-galaxy cross-correlation at higher signal-to-noise and compare the inferred void bias with the autocorrelation results. Void bias is constant with scale for voids of a given size, but its value falls from 5.6 +/- 1.0 to below zero as the void radius increases from 15 to 30 Mpc/h. The comparison of our measurements with carefully matched galaxy mock catalogs, with no free parameters related to the voids, shows that model predictions can be reliably made for void correlations. We study the dependence of void bias on tracer density and void size with a view to future applications. In combination with our previous lensing measurements of void mass profiles, these clustering measurements provide another step towards using voids as cosmological tracers.
  • We investigate the behavior of the fifth force in voids in chameleon models using the spherical collapse method. Contrary to Newtonian gravity, we find the fifth force is repulsive in voids. The strength of the fifth force depends on the density inside and outside the void region as well as its radius. It can be many times larger than the Newtonian force and their ratio is in principle unbound. This is very different from the case in halos, where the fifth force is no more than 1/3 of gravity. The evolution of voids is governed by the Newtonian gravity, the effective dark energy force and the fifth force. While the first two forces are common in both LCDM and chameleon universes, the fifth force is unique to the latter. Driven by the outward-pointing fifth force, individual voids in chameleon models expand faster and grow larger than in a LCDM universe. The expansion velocity of the void shell can be 20% to 30% larger for voids of a few Mpc/h in radius, while their sizes can be larger by ~10%. These differences are smaller for larger voids of the same density. We compare void statistics using excursion set theory; for voids of the same size, their number density is larger in chameleon models. The fractional difference increases with void size. The chance of having voids of radius ~25 Mpc/h can be 2.5 times larger. This difference is about 10 times larger than that in the halo mass function. We find strong environmental dependence of void properties in chameleon models. The differences in size and expansion velocity with GR are both larger for small voids in high density regions. In general, the difference between chameleon models and LCDM in void properties (size, expansion velocity and distribution function) are larger than the corresponding quantities for halos. This suggests that voids might be better candidates than halos for testing gravity.
  • We offer predictions of symmetron modified gravity in the neighborhood of realistic dark matter halos. The predictions for the fifth force are obtained by solving the nonlinear symmetron equation of motion in the spherical NFW approximation. In addition, we compare the three major known screening mechanisms: Vainshtein, Chameleon, and Symmetron around such dark matter sources, emphasizing the significant differences between them and highlighting observational tests which exploit these differences. Finally, we demonstrate the host halo environmental screening effect ("blanket screening") on smaller satellite halos by solving for the modified forces around a density profile which is the sum of satellite and approximate host components.