• We present results from a set of simulations designed to constrain the weak lensing shear calibration for the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) survey. These simulations include HSC observing conditions and galaxy images from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), with fully realistic galaxy morphologies and the impact of nearby galaxies included. We find that the inclusion of nearby galaxies in the images is critical to reproducing the observed distributions of galaxy sizes and magnitudes, due to the non-negligible fraction of unrecognized blends in ground-based data, even with the excellent typical seeing of the HSC survey (0.58" in the $i$-band). Using these simulations, we detect and remove the impact of selection biases due to the correlation of weights and the quantities used to define the sample (S/N and apparent size) with the lensing shear. We quantify and remove galaxy property-dependent multiplicative and additive shear biases that are intrinsic to our shear estimation method, including a $\sim 10$ per cent-level multiplicative bias due to the impact of nearby galaxies and unrecognized blends. Finally, we check the sensitivity of our shear calibration estimates to other cuts made on the simulated samples, and find that the changes in shear calibration are well within the requirements for HSC weak lensing analysis. Overall, the simulations suggest that the weak lensing multiplicative biases in the first-year HSC shear catalog are controlled at the 1 per cent level.
  • We measure and model the wavelength dependence of the PSF in the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Subaru Strategic Program (SSP) survey. We find that PSF chromaticity is present in that redder stars appear smaller than bluer stars in the $g, r,$ and $i$-bands at the 1-2 per cent level and in the $z$ and $y$-bands at the 0.1-0.2 per cent level. From the color dependence of the PSF, we fit a model between the monochromatic PSF trace radius, $R$, and wavelength of the form $R(\lambda)\propto \lambda^{b}$. We find values of $b$ between -0.2 and -0.5, depending on the epoch and filter. This is consistent with the expectations of a turbulent atmosphere with an outer scale length of $\sim 10-100$ m, indicating that the atmosphere is dominating the chromaticity. We find evidence in the best seeing data that the optical system and detector also contribute some wavelength dependence. Meyers and Burchat (2015) showed that $b$ must be measured to an accuracy of $\sim 0.02$ not to dominate the systematic error budget of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) weak lensing (WL) survey. Using simple image simulations, we find that $b$ can be inferred with this accuracy in the $r$ and $i$-bands for all positions in the LSST field of view, assuming a stellar density of 1 star arcmin$^{-2}$ and that the optical PSF can be accurately modeled. Therefore, it is possible to correct for most, if not all, of the bias that the wavelength-dependent PSF will introduce into an LSST-like WL survey.
  • Wavelength-dependent point spread functions (PSFs) violate an implicit assumption in current galaxy shape measurement algorithms that deconvolve the PSF measured from stars (which have stellar spectral energy distributions (SEDs)) from images of galaxies (which have galactic SEDs). Since the absorption length of silicon depends on wavelength, CCDs are a potential source of PSF chromaticity. Here we develop two toy models to estimate the sensitivity of the cosmic shear survey from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope to chromatic effects in CCDs. We then compare these toy models to simulated estimates of PSF chromaticity derived from the LSST photon simulator PhoSim. We find that even though sensor contributions to PSF chromaticity are subdominant to atmospheric contributions, they can still significantly bias cosmic shear results if left uncorrected, particularly in the redder filter bands and for objects that are off-axis in the field of view.
  • Current and future imaging surveys will measure cosmic shear with statistical precision that demands a deeper understanding of potential systematic biases in galaxy shape measurements than has been achieved to date. We use analytic and computational techniques to study the impact on shape measurements of two atmospheric chromatic effects for ground-based surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST): (i) atmospheric differential chromatic refraction and (ii) wavelength dependence of seeing. We investigate the effects of using the point spread function (PSF) measured with stars to determine the shapes of galaxies that have different spectral energy distributions than the stars. We find that both chromatic effects lead to significant biases in galaxy shape measurements for current and future surveys, if not corrected. Using simulated galaxy images, we find a form of chromatic `model bias' that arises when fitting a galaxy image with a model that has been convolved with a stellar, instead of galactic, point spread function. We show that both forms of atmospheric chromatic biases can be predicted (and corrected) with minimal model bias by applying an ordered set of perturbative PSF-level corrections based on machine-learning techniques applied to six-band photometry. Catalog-level corrections do not address the model bias. We conclude that achieving the ultimate precision for weak lensing from current and future ground-based imaging surveys requires a detailed understanding of the wavelength dependence of the PSF from the atmosphere, and from other sources such as optics and sensors. The source code for this analysis is available at https://github.com/DarkEnergyScienceCollaboration/chroma .
  • We present first results from the third GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing (GREAT3) challenge, the third in a sequence of challenges for testing methods of inferring weak gravitational lensing shear distortions from simulated galaxy images. GREAT3 was divided into experiments to test three specific questions, and included simulated space- and ground-based data with constant or cosmologically-varying shear fields. The simplest (control) experiment included parametric galaxies with a realistic distribution of signal-to-noise, size, and ellipticity, and a complex point spread function (PSF). The other experiments tested the additional impact of realistic galaxy morphology, multiple exposure imaging, and the uncertainty about a spatially-varying PSF; the last two questions will be explored in Paper II. The 24 participating teams competed to estimate lensing shears to within systematic error tolerances for upcoming Stage-IV dark energy surveys, making 1525 submissions overall. GREAT3 saw considerable variety and innovation in the types of methods applied. Several teams now meet or exceed the targets in many of the tests conducted (to within the statistical errors). We conclude that the presence of realistic galaxy morphology in simulations changes shear calibration biases by $\sim 1$ per cent for a wide range of methods. Other effects such as truncation biases due to finite galaxy postage stamps, and the impact of galaxy type as measured by the S\'{e}rsic index, are quantified for the first time. Our results generalize previous studies regarding sensitivities to galaxy size and signal-to-noise, and to PSF properties such as seeing and defocus. Almost all methods' results support the simple model in which additive shear biases depend linearly on PSF ellipticity.
  • GALSIM is a collaborative, open-source project aimed at providing an image simulation tool of enduring benefit to the astronomical community. It provides a software library for generating images of astronomical objects such as stars and galaxies in a variety of ways, efficiently handling image transformations and operations such as convolution and rendering at high precision. We describe the GALSIM software and its capabilities, including necessary theoretical background. We demonstrate that the performance of GALSIM meets the stringent requirements of high precision image analysis applications such as weak gravitational lensing, for current datasets and for the Stage IV dark energy surveys of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, ESA's Euclid mission, and NASA's WFIRST-AFTA mission. The GALSIM project repository is public and includes the full code history, all open and closed issues, installation instructions, documentation, and wiki pages (including a Frequently Asked Questions section). The GALSIM repository can be found at https://github.com/GalSim-developers/GalSim .