• In systems of programmable matter, we are given a collection of simple computation elements (or particles) with limited (constant-size) memory. We are interested in when they can self-organize to solve system-wide problems of movement, configuration and coordination. Here, we initiate a stochastic approach to developing robust distributed algorithms for programmable matter systems using Markov chains. We are able to leverage the wealth of prior work in Markov chains and related areas to design and rigorously analyze our distributed algorithms and show that they have several desirable properties. We study the compression problem, in which a particle system must gather as tightly together as possible, as in a sphere or its equivalent in the presence of some underlying geometry. More specifically, we seek fully distributed, local, and asynchronous algorithms that lead the system to converge to a configuration with small boundary. We present a Markov chain-based algorithm that solves the compression problem under the geometric amoebot model, for particle systems that begin in a connected configuration. The algorithm takes as input a bias parameter $\lambda$, where $\lambda > 1$ corresponds to particles favoring having more neighbors. We show that for all $\lambda > 2+\sqrt{2}$, there is a constant $\alpha > 1$ such that eventually with all but exponentially small probability the particles are $\alpha$-compressed, meaning the perimeter of the system configuration is at most $\alpha \cdot p_{min}$, where $p_{min}$ is the minimum possible perimeter of the particle system. Surprisingly, the same algorithm can also be used for expansion when $0 < \lambda < 2.17$, and we prove similar results about expansion for values of $\lambda$ in this range. This is counterintuitive as it shows that particles preferring to be next to each other ($\lambda > 1$) is not sufficient to guarantee compression.
  • In a self-organizing particle system, an abstraction of programmable matter, simple computational elements called particles with limited memory and communication self-organize to solve system-wide problems of movement, coordination, and configuration. In this paper, we consider a stochastic, distributed, local, asynchronous algorithm for "shortcut bridging", in which particles self-assemble bridges over gaps that simultaneously balance minimizing the length and cost of the bridge. Army ants of the genus Eciton have been observed exhibiting a similar behavior in their foraging trails, dynamically adjusting their bridges to satisfy an efficiency trade-off using local interactions. Using techniques from Markov chain analysis, we rigorously analyze our algorithm, show it achieves a near-optimal balance between the competing factors of path length and bridge cost, and prove that it exhibits a dependence on the angle of the gap being "shortcut" similar to that of the ant bridges. We also present simulation results that qualitatively compare our algorithm with the army ant bridging behavior. Our work gives a plausible explanation of how convergence to globally optimal configurations can be achieved via local interactions by simple organisms (e.g., ants) with some limited computational power and access to random bits. The proposed algorithm also demonstrates the robustness of the stochastic approach to algorithms for programmable matter, as it is a surprisingly simple extension of our previous stochastic algorithm for compression.
  • Imagine coating buildings and bridges with smart particles (also coined smart paint) that monitor structural integrity and sense and report on traffic and wind loads, leading to technology that could do such inspection jobs faster and cheaper and increase safety at the same time. In this paper, we study the problem of uniformly coating objects of arbitrary shape in the context of self-organizing programmable matter, i.e., programmable matter which consists of simple computational elements called particles that can establish and release bonds and can actively move in a self-organized way. Particles are anonymous, have constant-size memory, and utilize only local interactions in order to coat an object. We continue the study of our Universal Coating algorithm by focusing on its runtime analysis, showing that our algorithm terminates within a linear number of rounds with high probability. We also present a matching linear lower bound that holds with high probability. We use this lower bound to show a linear lower bound on the competitive gap between fully local coating algorithms and coating algorithms that rely on global information, which implies that our algorithm is also optimal in a competitive sense. Simulation results show that the competitive ratio of our algorithm may be better than linear in practice.
  • We consider programmable matter that consists of computationally limited devices (called particles) that are able to self-organize in order to achieve some collective goal without the need for central control or external intervention. We use the geometric amoebot model to describe such self-organizing particle systems, which defines how particles can actively move and communicate with one another. In this paper, we present an efficient local-control algorithm which solves the leader election problem in O(n) asynchronous rounds with high probability, where n is the number of particles in the system. Our algorithm relies only on local information --- particles do not have unique identifiers, any knowledge of n, or any sort of global coordinate system --- and requires only constant memory per particle.
  • We consider programmable matter consisting of simple computational elements, called particles, that can establish and release bonds and can actively move in a self-organized way, and we investigate the feasibility of solving fundamental problems relevant for programmable matter. As a suitable model for such self-organizing particle systems, we will use a generalization of the geometric amoebot model first proposed in SPAA 2014. Based on the geometric model, we present efficient local-control algorithms for leader election and line formation requiring only particles with constant size memory, and we also discuss the limitations of solving these problems within the general amoebot model.