• A persistent theme in the study of dark energy is the question of whether it really exists or not. It is often claimed hat we are mis-calculating the cosmological model by neglecting the effects associated with averaging over large-scale structures. In the Newtonian approximation this is clear: there is no effect. Within the full relativistic picture this remains an important open question however, owing to the complex mathematics involved. We study this issue using particle numerical simulations which account for all relevant relativistic effects without any problems from shell crossing. In this context we show for the first time that the backreaction from structure can differ by many orders of magnitude depending upon the slicing of spacetime one chooses to average over. In the worst case, where smoothing is carried out in synchronous spatial surfaces, the corrections can reach ten percent and more. However, when smoothing on the constant time hypersurface of the Newtonian gauge, backreaction contributions remain 3-5 orders of magnitude smaller.
  • In order to keep pace with the increasing data quality of astronomical surveys the observed source redshift has to be modeled beyond the well-known Doppler contribution. In this letter I want to examine the gauge issue that is often glossed over when one assigns a perturbed redshift to simulated data generated with a Newtonian N-body code. A careful analysis reveals the presence of a correction term that has so far been neglected. It is roughly proportional to the observed length scale divided by the Hubble scale and therefore suppressed inside the horizon. However, on gigaparsec scales it can be comparable to the gravitational redshift and hence amounts to an important relativistic effect.
  • We perform three-dimensional simulations of structure formation in the early Universe, when boosting the primordial power spectrum on approximately kpc scales. We demonstrate that our simulations are capable of producing power-law profiles close to the steep $\rho\propto r^{-9/4}$ halo profiles that are commonly assumed to be a good approximation to ultracompact minihalos (UCMHs). However, we show that for more realistic initial conditions in which halos are neither perfectly symmetric nor isolated, the steep power-law profile is disrupted and we find that the Navarro-Frenk-White profile is a better fit to most halos. In the presence of background fluctuations even extreme, nearly spherical initial conditions do not remain exceptional. Nonetheless, boosting the amplitude of initial fluctuations causes all structures to form earlier and thus at larger densities. With sufficiently large amplitude of fluctuations we find that values for the concentration of typical halos in our simulations can become very large. However, despite the signal coming from dark matter annihilation inside the cores of these halos being enhanced, it is still orders-of-magnitude smaller compared to the usually assumed UCMH profile. The upper bound on the primordial power spectrum from the non-observation of UCMHs should therefore be re-evaluated.
  • Some of the dark matter in the Universe is made up of massive neutrinos. Their impact on the formation of large scale structure can be used to determine their absolute mass scale from cosmology, but to this end accurate numerical simulations have to be developed. Due to their relativistic nature, neutrinos pose additional challenges when one tries to include them in N-body simulations that are traditionally based on Newtonian physics. Here we present the first numerical study of massive neutrinos that uses a fully relativistic approach. Our N-body code, gevolution, is based on a weak-field formulation of general relativity that naturally provides a self-consistent framework for relativistic particle species. This allows us to model neutrinos from first principles, without invoking any ad-hoc recipes. Our simulation suite comprises some of the largest neutrino simulations performed to date. We study the effect of massive neutrinos on the nonlinear power spectra and the halo mass function, focusing on the interesting mass range between 0.06 eV and 0.3 eV and including a case for an inverted mass hierarchy.
  • Newtonian N-body simulations have been employed successfully over the past decades for the simulation of the cosmological large-scale structure. Such simulations usually ignore radiation perturbations (photons and massless neutrinos) and the impact of general relativity (GR) beyond the background expansion. This approximation can be relaxed and we discuss three different approaches that are accurate to leading order in GR. For simulations that start at redshift less than about 100 we find that the presence of early radiation typically leads to percent-level effects on the numerical power spectra at large scales. Our numerical results agree across the three methods, and we conclude that all of the three methods are suitable for simulations in a standard cosmology. Two of the methods modify the N-body evolution directly, while the third method can be applied as a post-processing prescription.
  • We present a new N-body code, gevolution, for the evolution of large scale structure in the Universe. Our code is based on a weak field expansion of General Relativity and calculates all six metric degrees of freedom in Poisson gauge. N-body particles are evolved by solving the geodesic equation which we write in terms of a canonical momentum such that it remains valid also for relativistic particles. We validate the code by considering the Schwarzschild solution and, in the Newtonian limit, by comparing with the Newtonian N-body codes Gadget-2 and RAMSES. We then proceed with a simulation of large scale structure in a Universe with massive neutrinos where we study the gravitational slip induced by the neutrino shear stress. The code can be extended to include different kinds of dark energy or modified gravity models and going beyond the usually adopted quasi-static approximation. Our code is publicly available.
  • Despite its continued observational successes, there is a persistent (and growing) interest in extending cosmology beyond the standard model, $\Lambda$CDM. This is motivated by a range of apparently serious theoretical issues, involving such questions as the cosmological constant problem, the particle nature of dark matter, the validity of general relativity on large scales, the existence of anomalies in the CMB and on small scales, and the predictivity and testability of the inflationary paradigm. In this paper, we summarize the current status of $\Lambda$CDM as a physical theory, and review investigations into possible alternatives along a number of different lines, with a particular focus on highlighting the most promising directions. While the fundamental problems are proving reluctant to yield, the study of alternative cosmologies has led to considerable progress, with much more to come if hopes about forthcoming high-precision observations and new theoretical ideas are fulfilled.
  • We compute the angular power spectra of the E-type and B-type lensing potentials for gravitational waves from inflation and for tensor perturbations induced by scalar perturbations. We derive the tensor-lensed CMB power spectra for both cases. We also apply our formalism to determine the linear lensing potential for a Bianchi I spacetime with small anisotropy.
  • Numerical simulations are a versatile tool providing insight into the complicated process of structure formation in cosmology. This process is mainly governed by gravity, which is the dominant force on large scales. To date, a century after the formulation of general relativity, numerical codes for structure formation still employ Newton's law of gravitation. This approximation relies on the two assumptions that gravitational fields are weak and that they are only sourced by non-relativistic matter. While the former appears well justified on cosmological scales, the latter imposes restrictions on the nature of the "dark" components of the Universe (dark matter and dark energy) which are, however, poorly understood. Here we present the first simulations of cosmic structure formation using equations consistently derived from general relativity. We study in detail the small relativistic effects for a standard {\Lambda}CDM cosmology which cannot be obtained within a purely Newtonian framework. Our particle-mesh N-body code computes all six degrees of freedom of the metric and consistently solves the geodesic equation for particles, taking into account the relativistic potentials and the frame-dragging force. This conceptually clean approach is very general and can be applied to various settings where the Newtonian approximation fails or becomes inaccurate, ranging from simulations of models with dynamical dark energy or warm/hot dark matter to core collapse supernova explosions.
  • Within a cosmological context, we study the behaviour of collisionless particles in the weak field approximation to General Relativity, allowing for large gradients of the fields and relativistic velocities for the particles. We consider a spherically symmetric setup such that high resolution simulations are possible with minimal computational resources. We test our formalism by comparing it to two exact solutions: the Schwarzschild solution and the Lema\^itre-Tolman-Bondi model. In order to make the comparison we consider redshifts and lensing angles of photons passing through the simulation. These are both observable quantities and hence are gauge independent. We demonstrate that our scheme is more accurate than a Newtonian scheme, correctly reproducing the leading-order post-Newtonian correction. In addition, our setup is able to handle shell-crossings, which is not possible within a fluid model. Furthermore, by introducing angular momentum, we find configurations corresponding to bound objects which may prove useful for numerical studies of the effects of modified gravity, dynamical dark energy models or even compact bound objects within General Relativity.
  • The large-scale homogeneity and isotropy of the universe is generally thought to imply a well defined background cosmological model. It may not. Smoothing over structure adds in an extra contribution, transferring power from small scales up to large. Second-order perturbation theory implies that the effect is small, but suggests that formally the perturbation series may not converge. The amplitude of the effect is actually determined by the ratio of the Hubble scales at matter-radiation equality and today - which are entirely unrelated. This implies that a universe with significantly lower temperature today could have significant backreaction from more power on small scales, and so provides the ideal testing ground for understanding backreaction. We investigate this using two different N-body numerical simulations - a 3D Newtonian and a 1D simulation which includes all relevant relativistic effects. We show that while perturbation theory predicts an increasing backreaction as more initial small-scale power is added, in fact the virialisation of structure saturates the backreaction effect at the same level independently of the equality scale. This implies that backreaction is a small effect independently of initial conditions. Nevertheless, it may still contribute at the percent level to certain cosmological observables and therefore it cannot be neglected in precision cosmology.
  • We present a framework for general relativistic N-body simulations in the regime of weak gravitational fields. In this approach, Einstein's equations are expanded in terms of metric perturbations about a Friedmann-Lema\^itre background, which are assumed to remain small. The metric perturbations themselves are only kept to linear order, but we keep their first spatial derivatives to second order and treat their second spatial derivatives as well as sources of stress-energy fully non-perturbatively. The evolution of matter is modelled by an N-body ensemble which can consist of free-streaming nonrelativistic (e.g. cold dark matter) or relativistic particle species (e.g. cosmic neutrinos), but the framework is fully general and also allows for other sources of stress-energy, in particular additional relativistic sources like modified-gravity models or topological defects. We compare our method with the traditional Newtonian approach and argue that relativistic methods are conceptually more robust and flexible, at the cost of a moderate increase of numerical difficulty. However, for a LambdaCDM cosmology, where nonrelativistic matter is the only source of perturbations, the relativistic corrections are expected to be small. We quantify this statement by extracting post-Newtonian estimates from Newtonian N-body simulations.
  • Distance measurements are usually thought to probe the background metric of the universe, but in reality the presence of perturbations will lead to deviations from the result expected in an exactly homogeneous and isotropic universe. At least in principle the presence of perturbations could even explain the observed distance-redshift relation without the need for dark energy. In this paper we re-investigate a toy model where perturbations are plane symmetric, and for which exact solutions are known in the fluid limit. However, if perturbations are large, shell-crossing occurs and the fluid approximation breaks down. This prevents the study of the most interesting cases. Here we use a general-relativistic N-body simulation that does not suffer from this problem and which allows us to go beyond previous works. We show that even for very large plane-symmetric perturbations we are not able to mimic the observed distance-redshift relation. We also discuss how the synchronous comoving gauge breaks down when shell-crossing occurs, while metric perturbations in the longitudinal gauge remain small. For this reason the longitudinal (Newtonian) gauge appears superior for relativistic N-body simulations of large-scale structure formation.
  • We develop a formalism for General Relativistic N-body simulations in the weak field regime, suitable for cosmological applications. The problem is kept tractable by retaining the metric perturbations to first order, the first derivatives to second order and second derivatives to all orders, thus taking into account the most important nonlinear effects of Einstein gravity. It is also expected that any significant "backreaction" should appear at this order. We show that the simulation scheme is feasible in practice by implementing it for a plane-symmetric situation and running two test cases, one with only cold dark matter, and one which also includes a cosmological constant. For these plane-symmetric situations, the deviations from the usual Newtonian N-body simulations remain small and, apart from a non-trivial correction to the background, can be accurately estimated within the Newtonian framework. The correction to the background scale factor, which is a genuine "backreaction" effect, can be robustly obtained with our algorithm. Our numerical approach is also naturally suited for the inclusion of extra relativistic fields and thus for dark energy or modified gravity simulations.
  • For free fields, pair creation in expanding universes is associated with the building up of correlations that lead to nonseparable states, i.e., quantum mechanically entangled ones. For dissipative fields, i.e., fields coupled to an environment, there is a competition between the squeezing of the state and the coupling to the external bath. We compute the final coherence level for dissipative fields that propagate in a two-dimensional de Sitter space, and we characterize the domain in parameter space where the state remains nonseparable. We then apply our analysis to (analogue) Hawking radiation by exploiting the close relationship between Lorentz violating theories propagating in de Sitter and black hole metrics. We establish the robustness of the spectrum and find that the entanglement among Hawking pairs is generally much stronger than that among pairs of quanta with opposite momenta.
  • We examine the mode functions of the electromagnetic field on spherically symmetric backgrounds with special attention to the subclass which allows for the foliation as open Friedmann-Lemaitre (FL) spacetime. It is well-known that in certain scalar field theories on open FL background there can exist so-called supercurvature modes, their existence depending on parameters of the theory. Looking at specific open universe models, such as open inflation and the Milne universe, we find that no supercurvature modes are present in the spectrum of the electromagnetic field. This excludes the possibility for superadiabatic evolution of cosmological magnetic fields within these models without relying on new physics or breaking the conformal invariance of electromagnetism.
  • We study a homogeneous and nearly-isotropic Universe permeated by a homogeneous magnetic field. Together with an isotropic fluid, the homogeneous magnetic field, which is the primary source of anisotropy, leads to a plane-symmetric Bianchi I model of the Universe. However, when free-streaming relativistic particles are present, they generate an anisotropic pressure which counteracts the one from the magnetic field such that the Universe becomes isotropized. We show that due to this effect, the CMB temperature anisotropy from a homogeneous magnetic field is significantly suppressed if the the neutrino masses are smaller than 0.3 eV.
  • In a landscape of compactifications with different numbers of macroscopic dimensions, it is possible that our universe has nucleated from a vacuum where some of our four large dimensions were compact while other, now compact, directions were macroscopic. From our perspective, this shapeshifting can be perceived as an anisotropic background spacetime. As an example, we present a model where our universe emerged from a tunneling event which involves the decompactification of two dimensions compactified on the two-sphere. In this case, our universe is of the Kantowski-Sachs type and therefore homogeneous and anisotropic. We study the deviations from statistical isotropy of the Cosmic Microwave Background induced by the anisotropic curvature, with particular attention to the anomalies. The model predicts a quadrupolar power asymmetry with the same sign and acoustic oscillations as found by WMAP. The amplitude of the effect is however too small given the current estimated bound on anisotropic curvature derived from the quadrupole.
  • Motivated by cosmological first-order phase transitions we examine the nucleation and evolution of vacuum bubbles in non-vacuum environments. Non-standard backgrounds can be relevant in the context of rapid tunneling processes on the landscape. Utilising complex time methods, we show that tunneling rates can be notably modified in the case of dynamical FRW backgrounds. We give a classification of the importance of the effect in terms of the relevant dynamical time scales. For both the bubble nucleation and evolution analysis we make use of the thin-wall approximation. From the classical bubble evolution on homogeneous matter backgrounds via the junction method, we find that the inflation of vacuum bubbles is very sensitive to the presence of ambient matter and quantify this statement. We also employ inhomogeneous matter models (LTB) and models that undergo a rapid phase transition (FRW) as a background and discuss in which cases potentially observable imprints on the bubble trajectory can remain.
  • In this letter we discuss cosmological first order phase transitions with de Sitter bubbles nucleating on (inhomogeneous) matter backgrounds. The de Sitter bubble can be a toy model for an inflationary phase of universes like our own. Using the thin wall approximation and the Israel junction method we trace the classical evolution of the formed bubbles within a compound model. We first address homogeneous ambient space (FRW model) and already find that bubbles nucleated in a dust dominated background cannot expand. For an inhomogeneous dust background (LTB model) we describe cases with at least initially expanding bubbles. Yet, an ensuing passage of the bubble wall through ambient curvature inhomogeneities remains unnoticed for observers inside the bubble. Notable effects also for interior observers are found in the case of a rapid background phase transition in a FRW model.
  • In the context of bubble universes produced by a first-order phase transition with large nucleation rates compared to the inverse dynamical time scale of the parent bubble, we extend the usual analysis to non-vacuum backgrounds. In particular, we provide semi-analytic and numerical results for the modified nucleation rate in FLRW backgrounds, as well as a parameter study of bubble walls propagating into inhomogeneous (LTB) or FLRW spacetimes, both in the thin-wall approximation. We show that in our model, matter in the background often prevents bubbles from successful expansion and forces them to collapse. For cases where they do expand, we give arguments why the effects on the interior spacetime are small for a wide range of reasonable parameters and discuss the limitations of the employed approximations.
  • The sensitivity of inflationary spectra to initial conditions is addressed in the context of a phenomenological model that breaks Lorentz invariance by dissipative effects above some threshold energy $\Lambda$. These effects are obtained dynamically by coupling the fluctuation modes to extra degrees of freedom which are unobservable below $\Lambda$. Because of the strong dissipative effects in the early propagation, only the state of the extra degrees of freedom is relevant for the power spectrum. If this state is the ground state, and if $\Lambda$ is much larger than the Hubble scale $H$, the standard spectrum is recovered. Using analytical and numerical methods, we calculate the modifications for a large class of dissipative models. For all of these, we show that the leading modification (in an expansion in $H/\Lambda$) is linear in the decay rate evaluated at horizon exit, and that high frequency superimposed oscillations are not generated. The modification is negative when the decay rate decreases slower than the cube of $H$, which means that there is a loss of power on the largest scales.
  • The non-equilibrium phase transition in models for epidemic spreading with long-range infections in combination with incubation times is investigated by field-theoretical and numerical methods. Here the spreading process is modelled by spatio-temporal Levy flights, i.e., it is assumed that both spreading distance and incubation time decay algebraically. Depending on the infection rate one observes a phase transition from a fluctuating active phase into an absorbing phase, where the infection becomes extinct. This transition between spreading and extinction is characterized by continuously varying critical exponents, extending from a mean-field regime to a phase described by the universality class of directed percolation. We compute the critical exponents in the vicinity of the upper critical dimension by a field-theoretic renormalization group calculation and verify the results in one spatial dimension by extensive numerical simulations.