• We present a study of the cataclysmic variable star PT Per based on archival XMM-Newton X-ray data and new optical spectroscopy from the WHT with ISIS. The X-ray data show deep minima which recur at a period of 82 minutes and a hard, unabsorbed X-ray spectrum. The optical spectra of PT Per show a relatively featureless blue continuum. From an analysis of the X-ray and optical data we conclude that PT Per is likely to be a magnetic cataclysmic variable of the polar class in which the minima correspond to those phase intervals when the accretion column rotates out of the field of view of the observer. We suggest that the optical spectrum, obtained around 4 years after the X-ray coverage, is dominated by the white dwarf in the system, implying that PT Per was in a low accretion state at the time of the observations. An analysis of the likely system parameters for PT Per suggests a distance of $\approx90$ pc and a very low-mass secondary, consistent with the idea that PT Per is a "period-bounce" binary.
  • The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatory will be one of the largest ground-based very high-energy gamma-ray observatories. The On-Site Analysis will be the first CTA scientific analysis of data acquired from the array of telescopes, in both northern and southern sites. The On-Site Analysis will have two pipelines: the Level-A pipeline (also known as Real-Time Analysis, RTA) and the level-B one. The RTA performs data quality monitoring and must be able to issue automated alerts on variable and transient astrophysical sources within 30 seconds from the last acquired Cherenkov event that contributes to the alert, with a sensitivity not worse than the one achieved by the final pipeline by more than a factor of 3. The Level-B Analysis has a better sensitivity (not be worse than the final one by a factor of 2) and the results should be available within 10 hours from the acquisition of the data: for this reason this analysis could be performed at the end of an observation or next morning. The latency (in particular for the RTA) and the sensitivity requirements are challenging because of the large data rate, a few GByte/s. The remote connection to the CTA candidate site with a rather limited network bandwidth makes the issue of the exported data size extremely critical and prevents any kind of processing in real-time of the data outside the site of the telescopes. For these reasons the analysis will be performed on-site with infrastructures co-located with the telescopes, with limited electrical power availability and with a reduced possibility of human intervention. This means, for example, that the on-site hardware infrastructure should have low-power consumption. A substantial effort towards the optimization of high-throughput computing service is envisioned to provide hardware and software solutions with high-throughput, low-power consumption at a low-cost.
  • This White Paper, submitted to the recent ESA call for science themes to define its future large missions, advocates the need for a transformational leap in our understanding of two key questions in astrophysics: 1) How does ordinary matter assemble into the large scale structures that we see today? 2) How do black holes grow and shape the Universe? Hot gas in clusters, groups and the intergalactic medium dominates the baryonic content of the local Universe. To understand the astrophysical processes responsible for the formation and assembly of these large structures, it is necessary to measure their physical properties and evolution. This requires spatially resolved X-ray spectroscopy with a factor 10 increase in both telescope throughput and spatial resolving power compared to currently planned facilities. Feedback from supermassive black holes is an essential ingredient in this process and in most galaxy evolution models, but it is not well understood. X-ray observations can uniquely reveal the mechanisms launching winds close to black holes and determine the coupling of the energy and matter flows on larger scales. Due to the effects of feedback, a complete understanding of galaxy evolution requires knowledge of the obscured growth of supermassive black holes through cosmic time, out to the redshifts where the first galaxies form. X-ray emission is the most reliable way to reveal accreting black holes, but deep survey speed must improve by a factor ~100 over current facilities to perform a full census into the early Universe. The Advanced Telescope for High Energy Astrophysics (Athena+) mission provides the necessary performance (e.g. angular resolution, spectral resolution, survey grasp) to address these questions and revolutionize our understanding of the Hot and Energetic Universe. These capabilities will also provide a powerful observatory to be used in all areas of astrophysics.
  • We discuss the importance and potential contribution of Athena+ to the science questions related to gamma-ray bursts, tidal disruption events and supernova shock break-out. Athena+ will allow breakthrough observations involving high-resolution X-ray spectroscopic observations of high-z gamma-ray bursts, observations of tidal disruption events tailored to determine the mass and potentially the spin of the black hole responsible for the tidal disruption and observations of X-rays from the supernova shock breakout providing a measure of the radius of the exploding star or of the companion in the case of type Ia supernovae. We briefly discuss survey facilities that will provide triggers to these events envisaged to be operational around 2028.
  • We have derived an X-ray luminosity function using parallax-based distance measurements of a set of 12 dwarf novae, consisting of Suzaku, XMM-Newton and ASCA observations. The shape of the X-ray luminosity function obtained is the most accurate to date, and the luminosities of our sample are concentrated between ~10^{30}-10^{31} erg s^{-1}, lower than previous measurements of X-ray luminosity functions of dwarf novae. Based on the integrated X-ray luminosity function, the sample becomes more incomplete below ~3 x 10^{30} erg s^{-1} than it is above this luminosity limit, and the sample is dominated by X-ray bright dwarf novae. The total integrated luminosity within a radius of 200 pc is 1.48 x 10^{32} erg s^{-1} over the luminosity range of 1 x 10^{28} erg s^{-1} and the maximum luminosity of the sample (1.50 x 10^{32} erg s^{-1}). The total absolute lower limit for the normalised luminosity per solar mass is 1.81 x 10^{26} erg s^{-1} M^{-1}_{solar} which accounts for ~16 per cent of the total X-ray emissivity of CVs as estimated by Sazonov et al. (2006).
  • White dwarf masses in cataclysmic variables are difficult to determine accurately, but are fundamental for understanding binary system parameters, as well as binary evolution. We investigate the X-ray spectral properties of a sample of Intermediate Polars detected above 15 keV to derive the masses of their accreting white dwarfs. We use data from the Swift/BAT instrument which during the first 2.5 yrs of operation has detected 22 known intermediate polars. The X-ray spectra of these sources are used to estimate the mass of the white dwarfs. We are able to produce a mass estimate for 22 out of 29 of the confirmed intermediate polars. Comparison with previous mass measurements shows good agreement. For GK Per, we were able to detect spectral changes due to the changes in the accretion rate. The Swift/BAT detector with its combination of sensitivity and all-sky coverage provides an ideal tool to determine accurate white dwarf masses in intermediate polars.
  • We remark on the utility of an observational relation between the absorption column density in excess of the Galactic absorption column density, $\Delta N_{\rm H} = N_{\rm H, fit} - N_{\rm H, gal}$, and redshift, z, determined from all 55 Swift-observed long bursts with spectroscopic redshifts as of 2006 December. The absorption column densities, $N_{\rm H, fit}$, are determined from powerlaw fits to the X-ray spectra with the absorption column density left as a free parameter. We find that higher excess absorption column densities with $\Delta N_{\rm H} > 2\times 10^{21}$ cm$^{-2}$ are only present in bursts with redshifts z$<$2. Low absorption column densities with $\Delta N_{\rm H} < 1\times 10^{21}$ cm$^{-2}$ appear preferentially in high-redshift bursts. Our interpretation is that this relation between redshift and excess column density is an observational effect resulting from the shift of the source rest-frame energy range below 1 keV out of the XRT observable energy range for high redshift bursts. We found a clear anti-correlation between $\Delta N_{\rm H}$ and z that can be used to estimate the range of the maximum redshift of an afterglow. A critical application of our finding is that rapid X-ray observations can be used to optimize the instrumentation used for ground-based optical/NIR follow-up observations. Ground-based spectroscopic redshift measurements of as many bursts as possible are crucial for GRB science.
  • Recent gamma-ray burst observations have revealed late-time, highly energetic events which deviate from the simplest expectations of the standard fireball picture. Instead they may indicate that the central engine is active or restarted at late times. We suggest that fragmentation and subsequent accretion during the collapse of a rapidly rotating stellar core offers a natural mechanism for this.
  • We present XMM-Newton observations of the eclipsing, disc accreting, cataclysmic variable OY Car which were obtained as part of the performance verification phase of the mission. The star was observed 4 days after an outburst and then again 5 weeks later when it was in a quiescent state. There is a quasi-stable modulation of the X-rays at ~2240 sec, which is most prominent at the lowest energies. We speculate that this may be related to the spin period of the white dwarf. The duration of the eclipse ingress and egress in X-rays is 20--30 sec. This indicates that the bulk of the X-ray emission originates from the boundary layer which has a negligible height above the surface of the white dwarf. The eclipse profile implies a white dwarf of mass M_{1}=0.9-1.1Msun and a secondary star of M_{2}=0.08-0.11Msun.