• In a previous paper, using data from K2 Campaign 2, we identified 11 very low mass members of the $\rho$ Oph and Upper Scorpius star-forming region as having periodic photometric variability and phased light curves showing multiple scallops or undulations. All the stars with the "scallop-shell" light curve morphology are mid-to-late M dwarfs without evidence of active accretion, and with photometric periods generally $<$1 day. Their phased light curves have too much structure to be attributed to non-axisymmetrically distributed photospheric spots and rotational modulation. We have now identified an additional eight probable members of the same star-forming region plus three stars in the Taurus star-forming region with this same light curve morphology and sharing the same period and spectral type range as the previous group. We describe the light curves of these new stars in detail and present their general physical characteristics. We also examine the properties of the overall set of stars in order to identify common features that might help elucidate the causes of their photometric variability.
  • Detecting transient light curves (e.g., transiting planets) requires high precision data, and thus it is important to effectively filter systematic trends affecting ground based wide field surveys. We apply an implementation of the Trend Filtering Algorithm (TFA) (Kovacs et al. 2005) to the 2MASS calibration catalog and select Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) photometric time series data. TFA is successful at reducing the overall dispersion of light curves, however it may over filter intrinsic variables and increase "instantaneous" dispersion when a template set is not judiciously chosen. In an attempt to rectify these issues we modify the original literature TFA by including measurement uncertainties in its computation, including ancillary data correlated with noise, and algorithmically selecting a template set using clustering algorithms as suggested by various authors. This approach may be particularly useful for appropriately accounting for variable photometric precision surveys and/or combined data-sets. In summary, our contributions are to provide a MATLAB software implementation of TFA and a number of modifications tested on synthetics and real data, summarize the performance of TFA and various modifications on real ground based data sets (2MASS and PTF), and assess the efficacy of TFA and modifications using synthetic light curve tests consisting of transiting and sinusoidal variables. While the transiting variables test indicates that these modifications confer no advantage to transit detection, the sinusoidal variables test indicates potential improvements in detection accuracy.
  • We present a variability analysis of the early-release first quarter of data publicly released by the Kepler project. Using the stellar parameters from the Kepler Input Catalog, we have separated the sample into 129,000 dwarfs and 17,000 giants, and further sub-divided the luminosity classes into temperature bins corresponding approximately to the spectral classes A, F, G, K, and M. Utilizing the inherent sampling and time baseline of the public dataset (30 minute sampling and 33.5 day baseline), we have explored the variability of the stellar sample. The overall variability rate of the dwarfs is 25% for the entire sample, but can reach 100% for the brightest groups of stars in the sample. G-dwarfs are found to be the most stable with a dispersion floor of $\sigma \sim 0.04$ mmag. At the precision of Kepler, $>95$% of the giant stars are variable with a noise floor of $\sim 0.1$ mmag, 0.3 mmag, and 10 mmag for the G-giants, K-giants, and M-giants, respectively. The photometric dispersion of the giants is consistent with acoustic variations of the photosphere; the photometrically-derived predicted radial velocity distribution for the K-giants is in agreement with the measured radial velocity distribution. We have also briefly explored the variability fraction as a function of dataset baseline (1 - 33 days), at the native 30-minute sampling of the public Kepler data. To within the limitations of the data, we find that the overall variability fractions increase as the dataset baseline is increased from 1 day to 33 days, in particular for the most variable stars. The lower mass M-dwarf, K-dwarf, G-dwarf stars increase their variability more significantly than the higher mass F-dwarf and A-dwarf stars as the time-baseline is increased, indicating that the variability of the lower mass stars is mostly characterized by timescales of weeks whi...astroph will not allow longer abstract!
  • We demonstrate the ability to measure precise stellar barycentric radial velocities with the dispersed fixed-delay interferometer technique using the Exoplanet Tracker (ET), an instrument primarily designed for precision differential Doppler velocity measurements using this technique. Our barycentric radial velocities, derived from observations taken at the KPNO 2.1 meter telescope, differ from those of Nidever et al. by 0.047 km/s (rms) when simultaneous iodine calibration is used, and by 0.120 km/s (rms) without simultaneous iodine calibration. Our results effectively show that a Michelson interferometer coupled to a spectrograph allows precise measurements of barycentric radial velocities even at a modest spectral resolution of R ~ 5100. A multi-object version of the ET instrument capable of observing ~500 stars per night is being used at the Sloan 2.5 m telescope at Apache Point Observatory for the Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS), a wide-field radial velocity survey for extrasolar planets around TYCHO-2 stars in the magnitude range 7.6<V<12. In addition to precise differential velocities, this survey will also yield precise barycentric radial velocities for many thousands of stars using the data analysis techniques reported here. Such a large kinematic survey at high velocity precision will be useful in identifying the signature of accretion events in the Milky Way and understanding local stellar kinematics in addition to discovering exoplanets, brown dwarfs and spectroscopic binaries.
  • We report the detection of the first extrasolar planet, ET-1 (HD 102195b), using the Exoplanet Tracker (ET), a new generation Doppler instrument. The planet orbits HD 102195, a young star with solar metallicity that may be part of the local association. The planet imparts radial velocity variability to the star with a semiamplitude of $63.4\pm2.0$ m s$^{-1}$ and a period of 4.11 days. The planetary minimum mass ($m \sin i$) is $0.488\pm0.015$ $M_J$.
  • We propose to use a high throughput and high precision multi-object dispersed fixed-delay interferometer for all sky Doppler surveys for extrasolar planets. This instrument, a combination of a fixed-delay interferometer with a moderate resolution spectrometer,is completely different from current echelle spectrometers. Doppler RV is measured through monitoring interference fringe shifts of stellar absorption lines over a broad band. Coupling this multi-object instrument with a wide field telescope (a few degree, such as Sloan and WIYN) and UV, visible and near-IR detectors will allow to simultaneously obtain hundreds of stellar fringing spectra for searching for planets. The RV survey speed can be increased by more than 2 orders of magnitude over that for the echelles. A prototype dispersed fixed-delay interferometer has been observed at the Hobby-Eberly 9m and Palomar 5m telescopes in 2001 and demonstrated photo noise limited Doppler precision with Aldebaran. Our recent observations at the KPNO 2.1m telescope in 2002 demonstrate a short term Doppler precision of ~ 3 m/s with eta Cas (V = 3.5), a RV stable star and also obtained a RV curve for 51 Peg. (V = 5.5), confirming previous planet detection with an independent RV technique. The total measured detection efficiency including the sky, telescope and fiber transmission losses, the instrument and iodine transmission losses and detector quantum efficiency is 3.4% under 1.5 arcsec seeing conditions, which is comparable to all of the echelle spectrometers for planet detection.