• We introduce a new cosmic emulator for the matter power spectrum covering eight cosmological parameters. Targeted at optical surveys, the emulator provides accurate predictions out to a wavenumber k~5/Mpc and redshift z<=2. Besides covering the standard set of LCDM parameters, massive neutrinos and a dynamical dark energy of state are included. The emulator is built on a sample set of 36 cosmological models, carefully chosen to provide accurate predictions over the wide and large parameter space. For each model, we have performed a high-resolution simulation, augmented with sixteen medium-resolution simulations and TimeRG perturbation theory results to provide accurate coverage of a wide k-range; the dataset generated as part of this project is more than 1.2Pbyte. With the current set of simulated models, we achieve an accuracy of approximately 4%. Because the sampling approach used here has established convergence and error-control properties, follow-on results with more than a hundred cosmological models will soon achieve ~1% accuracy. We compare our approach with other prediction schemes that are based on halo model ideas and remapping approaches. The new emulator code is publicly available.
  • We present cosmological constraints from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) using a combined analysis of angular clustering of red galaxies and their cross-correlation with weak gravitational lensing of background galaxies. We use a 139 square degree contiguous patch of DES data from the Science Verification (SV) period of observations. Using large scale measurements, we constrain the matter density of the Universe as Omega_m = 0.31 +/- 0.09 and the clustering amplitude of the matter power spectrum as sigma_8 = 0.74 +/- 0.13 after marginalizing over seven nuisance parameters and three additional cosmological parameters. This translates into S_8 = sigma_8(Omega_m/0.3)^{0.16} = 0.74 +/- 0.12 for our fiducial lens redshift bin at 0.35 <z< 0.5, while S_8 = 0.78 +/- 0.09 using two bins over the range 0.2 <z< 0.5. We study the robustness of the results under changes in the data vectors, modelling and systematics treatment, including photometric redshift and shear calibration uncertainties, and find consistency in the derived cosmological parameters. We show that our results are consistent with previous cosmological analyses from DES and other data sets and conclude with a joint analysis of DES angular clustering and galaxy-galaxy lensing with Planck CMB data, Baryon Accoustic Oscillations and Supernova type Ia measurements.
  • Large-scale structure surveys in the coming years will measure the redshift-space power spectrum to unprecedented accuracy, allowing for powerful new tests of the LambdaCDM picture as well as measurements of particle physics parameters such as the neutrino masses. We extend the Time-RG perturbative framework to redshift space, computing the power spectrum P_s(k,mu) in massive neutrino cosmologies with time-dependent dark energy equations of state w(z). Time-RG is uniquely capable of incorporating scale-dependent growth into the P_s(k,mu) computation, which is important for massive neutrinos as well as modified gravity models. Although changes to w(z) and the neutrino mass fraction both affect the late-time scale-dependence of the non-linear power spectrum, we find that the two effects depend differently on the line-of-sight angle mu. Finally, we use the HACC N-body code to quantify errors in the perturbative calculations. For a LambdaCDM model at redshift z=1, our procedure predicts the monopole~(quadrupole) to 1% accuracy up to a wave number 0.19h/Mpc (0.28h/Mpc), compared to 0.08h/Mpc (0.07h/Mpc) for the Kaiser approximation and 0.19h/Mpc (0.16h/Mpc) for the current state-of-the-art perturbation scheme. Our calculation agrees with the simulated redshift-space power spectrum even for neutrino masses above the current bound, and for rapidly-evolving dark energy equations of state, |dw/dz| ~ 1. Along with this article, we make our redshift-space Time-RG implementation publicly available as the code redTime.
  • The halo occupation distribution (HOD) approach has proven to be an effective method for modeling galaxy clustering and bias. In this approach, galaxies of a given type are probabilistically assigned to individual halos in N-body simulations. In this paper, we present a fast emulator for predicting the fully nonlinear galaxy power spectrum over a range of freely specifiable HOD modeling parameters. The emulator is constructed using results from 100 HOD models run on a large LCDM N-body simulation, with Gaussian Process interpolation applied to a PCA-based representation of the galaxy power spectrum. The total error is currently ~3% (~2% in the simulation and ~1% in the emulation process) from z=1 to z=0, over the considered parameter range. We use the emulator to investigate parametric dependencies in the HOD model, as well as the behavior of galaxy bias as a function of HOD parameters. The emulator is publicly available at http://www.hep.anl.gov/cosmology/CosmicEmu/emu.html.
  • Over the last nine years of cosmic microwave background observations, the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe ($WMAP$) results were consistent with a $\Lambda$CDM cosmological model in which the age of the Universe is one Hubble time, and the time-averaged value of the deceleration parameter is consistent with zero. This curious observation has been put forward as a new coincidence problem for the $\Lambda$CDM concordance cosmology, which is in fact a `greater' coincidence than the near equality of the density parameters of matter and the cosmological constant. At the moment of writing these conference proceedings, the Planck Collaboration has released its first cosmological data, which revealed a small shift in the $\Lambda$CDM cosmological parameters when compared to $WMAP$. We show that under the assumption of a spatially flat $\Lambda$CDM cosmology, Planck's results remove this coincidence problem for $\Lambda$CDM at greater than 99\% confidence level.
  • Modern sky surveys are returning precision measurements of cosmological statistics such as weak lensing shear correlations, the distribution of galaxies, and cluster abundance. To fully exploit these observations, theorists must provide predictions that are at least as accurate as the measurements, as well as robust estimates of systematic errors that are inherent to the modeling process. In the nonlinear regime of structure formation, this challenge can only be overcome by developing a large-scale, multi-physics simulation capability covering a range of cosmological models and astrophysical processes. As a first step to achieving this goal, we have recently developed a prediction scheme for the matter power spectrum (a so-called emulator), accurate at the 1% level out to k~1/Mpc and z=1 for wCDM cosmologies based on a set of high-accuracy N-body simulations. It is highly desirable to increase the range in both redshift and wavenumber and to extend the reach in cosmological parameter space. To make progress in this direction, while minimizing computational cost, we present a strategy that maximally re-uses the original simulations. We demonstrate improvement over the original spatial dynamic range by an order of magnitude, reaching k~10 h/Mpc, a four-fold increase in redshift coverage, to z=4, and now include the Hubble parameter as a new independent variable. To further the range in k and z, a new set of nested simulations run at modest cost is added to the original set. The extension in h is performed by including perturbation theory results within a multi-scale procedure for building the emulator. This economical methodology still gives excellent error control, ~5% near the edges of the domain of applicability of the emulator. A public domain code for the new emulator is released as part of the work presented in this paper.
  • The concentration-mass relation for dark matter-dominated halos is one of the essential results expected from a theory of structure formation. We present a simple prediction scheme, a cosmic emulator, for the c-M relation as a function of cosmological parameters for wCDM models. The emulator is constructed from 37 individual models, with three nested N-body gravity-only simulations carried out for each model. The mass range covered by the emulator is 2 x 10^{12} M_sun < M <10^{15} M_sun with a corresponding redshift range of z=0 -1. Over this range of mass and redshift, as well as the variation of cosmological parameters studied, the mean halo concentration varies from c ~ 2 to c ~ 8. The distribution of the concentration at fixed mass is Gaussian with a standard deviation of one-third of the mean value, almost independent of cosmology, mass, and redshift over the ranges probed by the simulations. We compare results from the emulator with previously derived heuristic analytic fits for the c-M relation, finding that they underestimate the halo concentration at high masses. Using the emulator to investigate the cosmology dependence of the c-M relation over the currently allowable range of values, we find -- not surprisingly -- that \sigma_8 and \omega_m influence it considerably, but also that the dark energy equation of state parameter, w, has a substantial effect. In general, the concentration of lower-mass halos is more sensitive to changes in cosmological parameters as compared to cluster mass halos.
  • Redshift space distortions caused by galaxy peculiar velocities provide a window onto the growth rate of large scale structure and a method for testing general relativity. We investigate through a comparison of N-body simulations to various extensions of perturbation theory beyond the linear regime, the robustness of cosmological parameter extraction, including the gravitational growth index, \gamma. We find that the Kaiser formula and some perturbation theory approaches bias the growth rate by 1-sigma or more relative to the fiducial at scales as large as k > 0.07 h/Mpc. This bias propagates to estimates of the gravitational growth index as well as \Omega_m and the equation of state parameter and presents a significant challenge to modelling redshift space distortions. We also determine an accurate fitting function for a combination of line of sight damping and higher order angular dependence that allows robust modelling of the redshift space power spectrum to substantially higher k.
  • The present standard model of cosmology, $\Lambda$CDM, contains some intriguing coincidences. Not only are the dominant contributions to the energy density approximately of the same order at the present epoch, but we note that contrary to the emergence of cosmic acceleration as a recent phenomenon, the time averaged value of the deceleration parameter over the age of the universe is nearly zero. Curious features like these in $\Lambda$CDM give rise to a number of alternate cosmologies being proposed to remove them, including models with an equation of state w = -1/3. In this paper, we examine the validity of some of these alternate models and we also address some persistent misconceptions about the Hubble sphere and the event horizon that lead to erroneous conclusions about cosmology.
  • The Fractal Bubble model has been proposed as a viable cosmology that does not require dark energy to account for cosmic acceleration, but rather attributes its observational signature to the formation of structure. In this paper it is demonstrated that, in contrast to previous findings, this model is not a good fit to cosmological supernovae data; there is significant tension in the best fit parameters obtained from different samples, whereas LCDM is able to fit all datasets consistently. Furthermore, the concordance between galaxy clustering scales and data from the cosmic microwave background is not achieved with the most recent supernova compilations. The validity of the FB formalism as a sound cosmological model is further challenged as it is shown that previous studies of this model achieve concordance by requiring a value for the present day Hubble constant that is derived from supernovae data containing an arbitrary distance normalisation.
  • It is well known that interstellar travel is bounded by the finite speed of light, but on very large scales any rocketeer would also need to consider the influence of cosmological expansion on their journey. This paper examines accelerated journeys within the framework of Friedmann- Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker universes, illustrating how the duration of a fixed acceleration sharply divides exploration over interstellar and intergalactic distances. Furthermore, we show how the universal expansion increases the difficulty of intergalactic navigation, with small uncertainties in cosmological parameters resulting in significantly large deviations. This paper also shows that, contrary to simplistic ideas, the motion of any rocketeer is indistinguishable from Newtonian gravity if the acceleration is kept small.
  • While modern cosmology, founded in the language of general relativity, is almost a century old, the meaning of the expansion of space is still being debated. In this paper, the question of radar ranging in an expanding universe is examined, focusing upon light travel times during the ranging; it has recently been claimed that this proves that space physically expands. We generalize the problem into considering the return journey of an accelerating rocketeer, showing that while this agrees with expectations of special relativity for an empty universe, distinct differences occur when the universe contains matter. We conclude that this does not require the expansion of space to be a physical phenomenon, rather that we cannot neglect the influence of matter, seen through the laws of general relativity, when considering motions on cosmic scales.
  • It has long been known that once you cross the event horizon of a black hole, your destiny lies at the central singularity, irrespective of what you do. Furthermore, your demise will occur in a finite amount of proper time. In this paper, the use of rockets in extending the amount of time before the collision with the central singularity is examined. In general, the use of such rockets can increase your remaining time, but only up to a maximum value; this is at odds with the ``more you struggle, the less time you have'' statement that is sometimes discussed in relation to black holes. The derived equations are simple to solve numerically and the framework can be employed as a teaching tool for general relativity.