• We describe a new Large Program in progress on the Gemini North and South telescopes: Gemini Observations of Galaxies in Rich Early Environments (GOGREEN). This is an imaging and deep spectroscopic survey of 21 galaxy systems at $1<z<1.5$, selected to span a factor $>10$ in halo mass. The scientific objectives include measuring the role of environment in the evolution of low-mass galaxies, and measuring the dynamics and stellar contents of their host haloes. The targets are selected from the SpARCS, SPT, COSMOS and SXDS surveys, to be the evolutionary counterparts of today's clusters and groups. The new red-sensitive Hamamatsu detectors on GMOS, coupled with the nod-and-shuffle sky subtraction, allow simultaneous wavelength coverage over $\lambda\sim 0.6$--$1.05\mu$m, and this enables a homogeneous and statistically complete redshift survey of galaxies of all types. The spectroscopic sample targets galaxies with AB magnitudes $z^{\prime}<24.25$ and [3.6]$\mu$m$<22.5$, and is therefore statistically complete for stellar masses $M_\ast\gtrsim10^{10.3}M_\odot$, for all galaxy types and over the entire redshift range. Deep, multiwavelength imaging has been acquired over larger fields for most systems, spanning $u$ through $K$, in addition to deep IRAC imaging at 3.6$\mu$m. The spectroscopy is $\sim 50$ per cent complete as of semester 17A, and we anticipate a final sample of $\sim 500$ new cluster members. Combined with existing spectroscopy on the brighter galaxies from GCLASS, SPT and other sources, GOGREEN will be a large legacy cluster and field galaxy sample at this redshift that spectroscopically covers a wide range in stellar mass, halo mass, and clustercentric radius.
  • We analyse the evolution of environmental quenching efficiency, the fraction of quenched cluster galaxies that would be star-forming if they were in the field, as a function of redshift in 14 spectroscopically confirmed galaxy clusters with 0.87 < z < 1.63 from the Spitzer Adaptation of the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (SpARCS). The clusters are the richest in the survey at each redshift. Passive fractions rise from $42_{-13}^{+10}$\% at z ~ 1.6 to $80_{-9}^{+12}$\% at z ~ 1.3 and $88_{-3}^{+4}$\% at z < 1.1, outpacing the change in passive fraction in the field. Environmental quenching efficiency rises dramatically from $16_{-19}^{+15}$ at z ~ 1.6 to $62_{-15}^{+21}\% at z ~ 1.3 and $73_{-7}^{+8}$\% at z $\lesssim$ 1.1. This work is the first to show direct observational evidence for a rapid increase in the strength of environmental quenching in galaxy clusters at z ~ 1.5, where simulations show cluster-mass halos undergo non-linear collapse and virialisation.
  • We present the stellar mass functions (SMFs) of passive and star-forming galaxies with a limiting mass of 10$^{10.1}$ M$_{\odot}$ in four spectroscopically confirmed Spitzer Adaptation of the Red-sequence Cluster Survey (SpARCS) galaxy clusters at 1.37 $<$ z $<$ 1.63. The clusters have 113 spectroscopically confirmed members combined, with 8-45 confirmed members each. We construct $Ks$-band-selected photometric catalogs for each cluster with an average of 11 photometric bands ranging from $u$ to 8 $\mu$m. We compare our cluster galaxies to a field sample derived from a similar $Ks$-band-selected catalog in the UltraVISTA/COSMOS field. The SMFs resemble those of the field, but with signs of environmental quenching. We find that 30 $\pm$ 20\% of galaxies that would normally be forming stars in the field are quenched in the clusters. The environmental quenching efficiency shows little dependence on projected cluster-centric distance out to $\sim$ 4 Mpc, providing tentative evidence of pre-processing and/or galactic conformity in this redshift range. We also compile the available data on environmental quenching efficiencies from the literature, and find that the quenching efficiency in clusters and in groups appears to decline with increasing redshift in a manner consistent with previous results and expectations based on halo mass growth.
  • We perform a morphological study of 124 spectroscopically confirmed cluster galaxies in the z=0.84 galaxy cluster RX J0152.7-1357. Our classification scheme includes color information, visual morphology, and 1-component and 2-component light profile fitting derived from Hubble Space Telescope riz imaging. We adopt a modified version of a detailed classification scheme previously used in studies of field galaxies and found to be correlated with kinematic features of those galaxies. We compare our cluster galaxy morphologies to those of field galaxies at similar redshift. We also compare galaxy morphologies in regions of the cluster with different dark-matter density as determined by weak-lensing maps. We find an early-type fraction for the cluster population as a whole of 47%, about 2.8 times higher than the field, and similar to the dynamically young cluster MS 1054 at similar redshift. We find the most drastic change in morphology distribution between the low and intermediate dark matter density regions within the cluster, with the early type fraction doubling and the peculiar fraction dropping by nearly half. The peculiar fraction drops more drastically than the spiral fraction going from the outskirts to the intermediate-density regions. This suggests that many galaxies falling into clusters at z~0.8 may evolve directly from peculiar, merging, and compact systems into early-type galaxies, without having the chance to first evolve into a regular spiral galaxy.
  • We perform aperture photometry and profile fitting on 419 globular cluster (GC) candidates with mV \leq 23 mag identified in Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys BVI imaging, and estimate the effective radii of the clusters. We identify 85 previously known spectroscopically-confirmed clusters, and newly identify 136 objects as good cluster candidates within the 3{\sigma} color and size ranges defined by the spectroscopically confirmed clusters, yielding a total of 221 probable GCs. The luminosity function peak for the 221 probable GCs with estimated total dereddening applied is V ~(20.26 \pm 0.13) mag, corresponding to a distance of ~3.7\pm0.3 Mpc. The blue and red GC candidates, and the metal-rich (MR) and metal-poor (MP) spectroscopically confirmed clusters, are similar in half-light radius, respectively. Red confirmed clusters are about 6% larger in median half-light radius than blue confirmed clusters, and red and blue good GC candidates are nearly identical in half-light radius. The total population of confirmed and "good" candidates shows an increase in half-light radius as a function of galactocentric distance.
  • We obtained spectra of 74 globular clusters in M81. These globular clusters had been identified as candidates in an HST ACS I-band survey. 68 of these 74 clusters lie within 7' of the M81 nucleus. 62 of these clusters are newly spectroscopically confirmed, more than doubling the number of confirmed M81 GCs from 46 to 108. We determined metallicities for our 74 observed clusters using an empirical calibration based on Milky Way globular clusters. We combined our results with 34 M81 globular cluster velocities and 33 metallicities from the literature and analyzed the kinematics and metallicity of the M81 globular cluster system. The mean of the total sample of 107 metallicities is -1.06 +/- 0.07, higher than either M31 or the Milky Way. We suspect this high mean metallicity is due to an overrepresentation of metal-rich clusters in our sample created by the spatial limits of the HST I-band survey. The metallicity distribution shows marginal evidence for bimodality, with metal-rich and metal-poor peaks approximately matching those of M31 and the Milky Way. The GC system as a whole, and the metal-poor GCs alone, show evidence of a radial metallicity gradient. The M81 globular cluster system as a whole shows strong evidence of rotation, with V_r(deprojected) = 108 +/- 22 km/s overall. This result is likely biased toward high rotational velocity due to overrepresentation of metal-rich, inner clusters. The rotation patterns among globular cluster subpopulations are roughly similar to those of the Milky Way: clusters at small projected radii and metal-rich clusters rotate strongly, while clusters at large projected radii and metal-poor clusters show weaker evidence of rotation.