• We present multi-epoch VLT/SPHERE observations of the protoplanetary disk around HD 135344B (SAO 206462). The $J$-band scattered light imagery reveal, with high spatial resolution ($\sim$41 mas, 6.4 au), the disk surface beyond $\sim$20 au. Temporal variations are identified in the azimuthal brightness distributions of all epochs, presumably related to the asymmetrically shading dust distribution in the inner disk. These shadows manifest themselves as narrow lanes, cast by localized density enhancements, and broader features which possibly trace the larger scale dynamics of the inner disk. We acquired visible and near-infrared photometry which shows variations up to 10% in the $JHK$ bands, possibly correlated with the presence of the shadows. Analysis of archival VLTI/PIONIER $H$-band visibilities constrain the orientation of the inner disk to $i = 18.2\deg^{+3.4}_{-4.1}$ and ${\rm PA} = 57.3\deg \pm 5.7\deg$, consistent with an alignment with the outer disk or a minor disk warp of several degrees. The latter scenario could explain the broad, quasi-stationary shadowing in N-NW direction in case the inclination of the outer disk is slightly larger. The correlation between the shadowing and the near-infrared excess is quantified with a grid of radiative transfer models. The variability of the scattered light contrast requires extended variations in the inner disk atmosphere ($H/r \lesssim 0.2$). Possible mechanisms that may cause asymmetric variations in the optical depth ($\Delta\tau\lesssim1$) through the atmosphere of the inner disk include turbulent fluctuations, planetesimal collisions, or a dusty disk wind, possibly enhanced by a minor disk warp. A fine temporal sampling is required to follow day-to-day changes of the shadow patterns which may be a face-on variant of the UX Orionis phenomenon.
  • HR4796A is surrounded by a debris disc, observed in scattered light as an inclined ring. Past observations raised several questions. First, a strong brightness asymmetry detected in polarized reflected light recently challenged our understanding of scattering by the dust particles in this system. Secondly, the morphology of the ring strongly suggests the presence of planets, although no planets have been detected to date. We obtained high-angular resolution coronagraphic images of the circumstellar environment around HR4796A with VLT/SPHERE during the commissioning of the instrument in May 2014 and during guaranteed-time observations in February 2015. The observations reveal for the first time the entire ring of dust, including the semi-minor axis that was previously hidden either behind the coronagraphic spot or in the speckle noise. We determine empirically the scattering phase function of the dust in the H band from 13.6deg to 166.6deg. It shows a prominent peak of forward scattering, never detected before, for scattering angles below 30deg. We analyse the reflectance spectra of the disc from the 0.95 to 1.6 microns, confirming the red colour of the dust, and derive detection limits on the presence of planetary mass objects. We confirm which side of the disc is inclined towards the Earth. The analysis of the phase function suggests that the dust population is dominated by particles much larger than the observation wavelength, of about 20 microns. Compact Mie grains of this size are incompatible with the spectral energy distribution of the disc, however the observed rise in scattering efficiency beyond 50deg points towards aggregates which could reconcile both observables. We do not detect companions orbiting the star but our high-contrast observations provide the most stringent constraints yet on the presence of planets responsible for the morphology of the dust.
  • The development of adaptive optics (AO) played a major role in modern astronomy over the last three decades. By compensating for the atmospheric turbulence, these systems enable to reach the diffraction limit on large telescopes. In this review, we will focus on high contrast applications of adaptive optics, namely, imaging the close vicinity of bright stellar objects and revealing regions otherwise hidden within the turbulent halo of the atmosphere to look for objects with a contrast ratio lower than 10^-4 with respect to the central star. Such high-contrast AO-corrected observations have led to fundamental results in our current understanding of planetary formation and evolution as well as stellar evolution. AO systems equipped three generations of instruments, from the first pioneering experiments in the nineties, to the first wave of instruments on 8m-class telescopes in the years 2000, and finally to the extreme AO systems that have recently started operations. Along with high-contrast techniques, AO enables to reveal the circumstellar environment: massive protoplanetary disks featuring spiral arms, gaps or other asymmetries hinting at on-going planet formation, young giant planets shining in thermal emission, or tenuous debris disks and micron-sized dust leftover from collisions in massive asteroid-belt analogs. After introducing the science case and technical requirements, we will review the architecture of standard and extreme AO systems, before presenting a few selected science highlights obtained with recent AO instruments.
  • HD 141569 A is a pre-main sequence B9.5 Ve star surrounded by a prominent and complex circumstellar disk, likely still in a transition stage from protoplanetary to debris disk phase. Here, we present a new image of the third inner disk component of HD 141569 A made in the L' band (3.8 micron) during the commissioning of the vector vortex coronagraph recently installed in the near-infrared imager and spectrograph NIRC2 behind the W.M. Keck Observatory Keck II adaptive optics system. We used reference point spread function subtraction, which reveals the innermost disk component from the inner working distance of $\simeq 23$ AU and up to $\simeq 70$ AU. The spatial scale of our detection roughly corresponds to the optical and near-infrared scattered light, thermal Q, N and 8.6 micron PAH emission reported earlier. We also see an outward progression in dust location from the L'-band to the H-band (VLT/SPHERE image) to the visible (HST/STIS image), likely indicative of dust blowout. The warm disk component is nested deep inside the two outer belts imaged by HST NICMOS in 1999 (respectively at 406 and 245 AU). We fit our new L'-band image and spectral energy distribution of HD 141569 A with the radiative transfer code MCFOST. Our best-fit models favor pure olivine grains, and are consistent with the composition of the outer belts. While our image shows a putative very-faint point-like clump or source embedded in the inner disk, we did not detect any true companion within the gap between the inner disk and the first outer ring, at a sensitivity of a few Jupiter masses.
  • Uncovering the ingredients and the architecture of planetary systems is a very active field of research that has fuelled many new theories on giant planet formation, migration, composition, and interaction with the circumstellar environment. We aim at discovering and studying new such systems, to further expand our knowledge of how low-mass companions form and evolve. We obtained high-contrast H-band images of the circumstellar environment of the F5V star HD206893, known to host a debris disc never detected in scattered light. These observations are part of the SPHERE High Angular Resolution Debris Disc Survey (SHARDDS) using the InfraRed Dual-band Imager and Spectrograph (IRDIS) installed on VLT/SPHERE. We report the detection of a source with a contrast of 3.6x10^{-5} in the H-band, orbiting at a projected separation of 270 milliarcsecond or 10 au, corresponding to a mass in the range 24 to 73 Mjup for an age of the system in the range 0.2 to 2 Gyr. The detection was confirmed ten months later with VLT/NaCo, ruling out a background object with no proper motion. A faint extended emission compatible with the disc scattered light signal is also observed. The detection of a low-mass companion inside a massive debris disc makes this system an analog of other young planetary systems such as beta Pictoris, HR8799 or HD95086 and requires now further characterisation of both components to understand their interactions.
  • We present the first resolved image of the debris disk around the 16+/-8 Myr old star, HD 114082. The observation was made in the H-band using the SPHERE instrument. The star is at a distance of 92+/-6 pc in the Lower Centaurus Crux association. Using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis, we determined that the debris is likely in the form of a dust ring with an inner edge of 27.7+2.8/-3.5 au, position angle -74+0.5/-1.5 deg, and an inclination with respect to the line of sight of 6.7+3.8/-0.4 deg. The disk imaged in scattered light has a surface density declining with radius like ~r^(-4), steeper than expected for grain blowout by radiation pressure. We find only marginal evidence (2 sigma) of eccentricity, and rule out planets more massive than 1.0 Mjup orbiting within 1 au of the ring's inner edge, since such a planet would have disrupted the disk. The disk has roughly the same fractional disk luminosity (Ldisk/L*=3.3x10^(-3)) as HR4796A and Beta Pictoris, however it was not detected by previous instrument facilities most likely because of its small angular size (radius~0.4"), low albedo (~0.2) and low scattering efficiency far from the star due to high scattering anisotropy. With the arrival of extreme adaptive optics systems like SPHERE and GPI, the morphology of smaller, fainter and more distant debris disks are being revealed, providing clues to planet-disk interactions in young protoplanetary systems.
  • HR8799 is orbited by at least four giant planets, making it a prime target for the recently commissioned Spectro-Polarimetric High-contrast Exoplanet REsearch (VLT/SPHERE). As such, it was observed on five consecutive nights during the SPHERE science verification in December 2014. We aim to take full advantage of the SPHERE capabilities to derive accurate astrometric measurements based on H-band images acquired with the Infra-Red Dual-band Imaging and Spectroscopy (IRDIS) subsystem, and to explore the ultimate astrometric performance of SPHERE in this observing mode. We also aim to present a detailed analysis of the orbital parameters for the four planets. We report the astrometric positions for epoch 2014.93 with an accuracy down to 2.0 mas, mainly limited by the astrometric calibration of IRDIS. For each planet, we derive the posterior probability density functions for the six Keplerian elements and identify sets of highly probable orbits. For planet d, there is clear evidence for nonzero eccentricity ($e \simeq 0.35$), without completely excluding solutions with smaller eccentricities. The three other planets are consistent with circular orbits, although their probability distributions spread beyond $e = 0.2$, and show a peak at $e \simeq 0.1$ for planet e. The four planets have consistent inclinations of about $30\deg$ with respect to the sky plane, but the confidence intervals for the longitude of ascending node are disjoint for planets b and c, and we find tentative evidence for non-coplanarity between planets b and c at the $2 \sigma$ level.
  • We present the current results of the astrometric characterization of the VLT planet finder SPHERE over 2 years of on-sky operations. We first describe the criteria for the selection of the astrometric fields used for calibrating the science data: binaries, multiple systems, and stellar clusters. The analysis includes measurements of the pixel scale and the position angle with respect to the North for both near-infrared subsystems, the camera IRDIS and the integral field spectrometer IFS, as well as the distortion for the IRDIS camera. The IRDIS distortion is shown to be dominated by an anamorphism of 0.60+/-0.02% between the horizontal and vertical directions of the detector, i.e. 6 mas at 1". The anamorphism is produced by the cylindrical mirrors in the common path structure hence common to all three SPHERE science subsystems (IRDIS, IFS, and ZIMPOL), except for the relative orientation of their field of view. The current estimates of the pixel scale and North angle for IRDIS are 12.255+/-0.009 milliarcseconds/pixel for H2 coronagraphic images and -1.75+/-0.08 deg. Analyses of the IFS data indicate a pixel scale of 7.46+/-0.02 milliarcseconds/pixel and a North angle of -102.18+/-0.13 deg. We finally discuss plans for providing astrometric calibration to the SPHERE users outside the instrument consortium.
  • For several years, we have been developing vortex phase masks based on sub-wavelength gratings, known as Annular Groove Phase Masks. Etched onto diamond substrates, these AGPMs are currently designed to be used in the thermal infrared (ranging from 3 to 13 {\mu}m). Our AGPMs were first installed on VLT/NACO and VLT/VISIR in 2012, followed by LBT/LMIRCam in 2013 and Keck/NIRC2 in 2015. In this paper, we review the development, commissioning, on-sky performance, and early scientific results of these new coronagraphic modes and report on the lessons learned. We conclude with perspectives for future developments and applications.
  • HR 4796A is surrounded by a well-structured and very bright circumstellar disc shaped like an annulus with many interesting features: very sharp inner and outer edges, brightness asymmetries, centre offset, and suspected distortions in the ring. We aim to constrain the properties of the dust surrounding the star HR 4796A, in particular the grain size and composition. We also want to confirm and refine the morphological parameters derived from previous scattered light observations, and reveal the dust spatial extent in regions unexplored so far due to their proximity to the star. We have obtained new images in polarised light of the binary system HR 4796A and B in the Ks and Lp band with the NaCo instrument at the Very Large Telescope (VLT). In addition, we revisit two archival data sets obtained in the Lp band with that same instrument and at 2.2 microns with the NICMOS instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope. We analyse these observations with simulations using the radiative transfer code MCFOST to investigate the dust properties. We explore a grid of models with various dust compositions and sizes in a Bayesian approach. We detect the disc in polarised light in the Ks band and reveal for the first time the innermost regions down to $0.3"$ along the semi-minor axis. We measure a polarised fraction of $29\%\pm8\%$ in the two disc ansae, with a maximum occurring more than $13^\circ$ westwards from the ansae. A very pronounced brightness asymmetry between the north-west and south-east side is detected. This contradicts the asymmetry previously reported in all images of the disc in unpolarised light at wavelengths smaller than or equal to 2.2 microns and is inconsistent with the predicted scattered light from spherical grains using the Mie theory. Our modelling suggests the north-west side is most likely inclined towards the Earth, contrary to previous conclusions.
  • (abridged) Vortex coronagraphs are among the most promising solutions to perform high contrast imaging at small angular separations. They feature a very small inner working angle, a clear 360 degree discovery space, have demonstrated very high contrast capabilities, are easy to implement on high-contrast imaging instruments, and have already been extensively tested on the sky. Since 2005, we have been designing, developing and testing an implementation of the charge-2 vector vortex phase mask based on concentric subwavelength gratings, referred to as the Annular Groove Phase Mask (AGPM). Science-grade mid-infrared AGPMs were produced in 2012 for the first time, using plasma etching on synthetic diamond substrates. They have been validated on a coronagraphic test bench, showing broadband peak rejection up to 500:1 in the L band, which translates into a raw contrast of about $6\times 10^{-5}$ at $2 \lambda/D$. Three of them have now been installed on world-leading diffraction-limited infrared cameras (VLT/NACO, VLT/VISIR and LBT/LMIRCam). During the science verification observations with our L-band AGPM on NACO, we observed the beta Pictoris system and obtained unprecedented sensitivity limits to planetary companions down to the diffraction limit ($0.1''$). More recently, we obtained new images of the HR 8799 system at L band during the AGPM first light on LMIRCam. After reviewing these first results obtained with mid-infrared AGPMs, we will discuss the short- and mid-term goals of the on-going VORTEX project, which aims to improve the performance of our vortex phase masks for future applications on second-generation high-contrast imagers and on future extremely large telescopes (ELTs).
  • Context. Detecting and characterizing circumstellar dust is a way to study the architecture and evolution of planetary systems. Cold dust in debris disks only traces the outer regions. Warm and hot exozodiacal dust needs to be studied in order to trace regions close to the habitable zone. Aims. We aim to determine the prevalence and to constrain the properties of hot exozodiacal dust around nearby main-sequence stars. Methods. We search a magnitude limited (H < 5) sample of 92 stars for bright exozodiacal dust using our VLTI visitor instrument PIONIER in the H-band. We derive statistics of the detection rate with respect to parameters such as the stellar spectral type and age or the presence of a debris disk in the outer regions of the systems. We derive more robust statistics by combining our sample with the results from our CHARA/FLUOR survey in the K-band. In addition, our spectrally dispersed data allows us to put constraints on the emission mechanism and the dust properties in the detected systems. Results. We find an over-all detection rate of bright exozodiacal dust in the H-band of 11% (9 out of 85 targets) and three tentative detections. The detection rate decreases from early type to late type stars and increases with the age of the host star. We do not confirm the tentative correlation between the presence of cold and hot dust found in our earlier analysis of the FLUOR sample alone. Our spectrally dispersed data suggest that either the dust is extremely hot or the emission is dominated by the scattered light in most cases. The implications of our results for the target selection of future terrestrial planet finding missions using direct imaging are discussed.
  • The Exozodi survey aims to determine the occurrence rate of bright exozodiacal discs around nearby main sequence stars using infrared interferometry. Although the Exozodi survey targets have been carefully selected to avoid the presence of binary stars, the results of this survey can still be biased by the presence of unidentified stellar companions. Using the PIONIER data set collected within the Exozodi survey, we aim to search for the signature of point-like companions around the Exozodi target stars. We use both the closure phases and squared visibilities collected by PIONIER to search for companions within the ~100 mas interferometric field of view. The presence of a companion is assessed by computing the goodness of fit to the data for a series of binary models with various separations and contrasts. Five stellar companions are resolved for the first time around five A-type stars: HD 4150, HD 16555, HD 29388, HD 202730, and HD 224392 (although the companion to HD 16555 was independently resolved by speckle interferometry while we were carrying out the survey). In the most likely case of main sequence companions, their spectral types range from A5V to K4V. Three of these stars were already suspected to be binaries from Hipparcos astrometric measurements, although no information was available on the companions themselves so far. In addition to debiasing the statistics of the Exozodi survey, these results can also be used to revise the fraction of visual binaries among A-type stars, suggesting that an extra ~13% A-type stars are visual binaries in addition to the ones detected in previous direct imaging surveys. We estimate that about half the population of nearby A-type stars could be resolved as visual binaries using a combination of state-of-the-art interferometry and single-aperture imaging, and we suggest that a significant fraction of these binaries remains undetected to date.
  • We present L' and J-band high-contrast observations of HD169142, obtained with the VLT/NACO AGPM vector vortex coronagraph and the Gemini Planet Imager, respectively. A source located at 0".156+/-0".032 north of the host star (PA=7.4+/-11.3 degrees) appears in the final reduced L' image. At the distance of the star (~145 pc), this angular separation corresponds to a physical separation of 22.7+/-4.7 AU, locating the source within the recently resolved inner cavity of the transition disk. The source has a brightness of L'=12.2+/-0.5 mag, whereas it is not detected in the J band (J>13.8 mag). If its L' brightness arose solely from the photosphere of a companion and given the J-L' color constraints, it would correspond to a 28-32 MJupiter object at the age of the star, according to the COND models. Ongoing accretion activity of the star suggests, however, that gas is left in the inner disk cavity from which the companion could also be accreting. In this case the object could be lower in mass and its luminosity enhanced by the accretion process and by a circumplanetary disk. A lower mass object is more consistent with the observed cavity width. Finally, the observations enable us to place an upper limit on the L'-band flux of a second companion candidate orbiting in the disk annular gap at ~50 AU, as suggested by millimeter observations. If the second companion is also confirmed, HD169142 might be forming a planetary system, with at least two companions opening gaps and possibly interacting with each other.
  • In this paper, we review the impact of small sample statistics on detection thresholds and corresponding confidence levels (CLs) in high contrast imaging at small angles. When looking close to the star, the number of resolution elements decreases rapidly towards small angles. This reduction of the number of degrees of freedom dramatically affects CLs and false alarm probabilities. Naively using the same ideal hypothesis and methods as for larger separations, which are well understood and commonly assume Gaussian noise, can yield up to one order of magnitude error in contrast estimations at fixed CL. The statistical penalty exponentially increases towards very small inner working angles. Even at 5-10 resolution elements from the star, false alarm probabilities can be significantly higher than expected. Here we present a rigorous statistical analysis which ensures robustness of the CL, but also imposes a substantial limitation on corresponding achievable detection limits (thus contrast) at small angles. This unavoidable fundamental statistical effect has a significant impact on current coronagraphic and future high contrast imagers. Finally, the paper concludes with practical recommendations to account for small number statistics when computing the sensitivity to companions at small angles and when exploiting the results of direct imaging planet surveys.
  • Context. The orbit of the giant planet discovered around beta Pic is slightly inclined with respect to the outer parts of the debris disc, which creates a warp in the inner debris disc. This inclination might be explained by gravitational interactions with other planets. Aims. We aim to search for additional giant planets located at smaller angular separations from the star. Methods. We used the new L'-band AGPM coronagraph on VLT/NACO, which provides an exquisite inner working angle. A long observing sequence was obtained on beta Pic in pupil-tracking mode. To derive sensitivity limits, the collected images were processed using a principal-component analysis technique specifically tailored to angular differential imaging. Results. No additional planet is detected down to an angular separation of 0.2" with a sensitivity better than 5 MJup. Meaningful upper limits (< 10 MJup) are derived down to an angular separation of 0.1", which corresponds to 2 AU at the distance of beta Pic.
  • Over the past five years, radial-velocity and transit techniques have revealed a new population of Earth-like planets with masses of a few Earth masses. Their very close orbit around their host star requires an exquisite inner working angle to be detected in direct imaging and sets a challenge for direct imagers that work in the visible range, like SPHERE / ZIMPOL. Among all known exoplanets with less than twenty-five Earth-masses we first predict the best candidate for direct imaging. Our primary objective is then to provide the best instrument setup and observing strategy for detecting such a peculiar object with ZIMPOL. As a second step, we aim at predicting its detectivity. Using exoplanet properties constrained by radial velocity measurements, polarimetric models and the diffraction propagation code CAOS, we estimate the detection sensitivity of ZIMPOL for such a planet in different observing modes of the instrument. We show how observing strategies can be optimized to yield the best detection performance on a specific target. In our current knowledge of exoplanetary systems, alpha Centauri B b is the most promising target with less than twenty-five Earth-masses for ZIMPOL. With a gaseous Rayleigh-scattering atmosphere and favorable inclinations, the planet could be detected in about four hours of observing time, using the four-quadrant phase-mask coronograph in the I band. However, if alpha Centauri B b should display unfavorable polarimetric and reflective properties similar to that of our Moon, it is around 50 times fainter than the best sensitivity of ZIMPOL. Alpha Centauri B is a primary target for SPHERE. Dedicated deep observations specifically targeting the radial velocity-detected planet can lead to a detection if the polarimetric properties of the planet are favorable.
  • Small-angle coronagraphy is technically and scientifically appealing because it enables the use of smaller telescopes, allows covering wider wavelength ranges, and potentially increases the yield and completeness of circumstellar environment - exoplanets and disks - detection and characterization campaigns. However, opening up this new parameter space is challenging. Here we will review the four posts of high contrast imaging and their intricate interactions at very small angles (within the first 4 resolution elements from the star). The four posts are: choice of coronagraph, optimized wavefront control, observing strategy, and post-processing methods. After detailing each of the four foundations, we will present the lessons learned from the 10+ years of operations of zeroth and first-generation adaptive optics systems. We will then tentatively show how informative the current integration of second-generation adaptive optics system is, and which lessons can already be drawn from this fresh experience. Then, we will review the current state of the art, by presenting world record contrasts obtained in the framework of technological demonstrations for space-based exoplanet imaging and characterization mission concepts. Finally, we will conclude by emphasizing the importance of the cross-breeding between techniques developed for both ground-based and space-based projects, which is relevant for future high contrast imaging instruments and facilities in space or on the ground.
  • Direct imaging of circumstellar disks at high angular resolution is mandatory to provide morphological information that bring constraints on their properties, in particular the spatial distribution of dust. New techniques combining observing strategy and data processing now allow very high contrast imaging with 8-m class ground-based telescopes (10^-4 to 10^-5 at ~1") and complement space telescopes while improving angular resolution at near infrared wavelengths. We carried out a program at the VLT with NACO to image known debris disks with higher angular resolution in the near IR than ever before in order to study morphological properties and ultimately to detect signpost of planets. The observing method makes use of advanced techniques: Adaptive Optics, Coronagraphy and Differential Imaging, a combination designed to directly image exoplanets with the upcoming generation of "planet finders" like GPI (Gemini Planet Imager) and SPHERE (Spectro-Polarimetric High contrast Exoplanet REsearch). Applied to extended objects like circumstellar disks, the method is still successful but produces significant biases in terms of photometry and morphology. We developed a new model-matching procedure to correct for these biases and hence to bring constraints on the morphology of debris disks. From our program, we present new images of the disk around the star HD 32297 obtained in the H (1.6mic) and Ks (2.2mic) bands with an unprecedented angular resolution (~65 mas). The images show an inclined thin disk detected at separations larger than 0.5-0.6". The modeling stage confirms a very high inclination (i=88{\deg}) and the presence of an inner cavity inside r_0~110AU. We also found that the spine (line of maximum intensity along the midplane) of the disk is curved and we attributed this feature to a large anisotropic scattering factor (g~0.5, valid for an non-edge on disk). Abridged ...