• Low-density, highly porous graphene/graphene oxide (GO) based-foams have shown high performance in energy absorption applications, even under high compressive deformations. In general, foams are very effective as energy dissipative materials and have been widely used in many areas such as automotive, aerospace and biomedical industries. In the case of graphene-based foams, the good mechanical properties are mainly attributed to the intrinsic graphene and/or GO electronic and mechanical properties. Despite the attractive physical properties of graphene/GO based-foams, their structural and thermal stabilities are still a problem for some applications. For instance, they are easily degraded when placed in flowing solutions, either by the collapsing of their layers or just by structural disintegration into small pieces. Recently, a new and scalable synthetic approach to produce low-density 3D macroscopic GO structure interconnected with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymeric chains (pGO) was proposed. A controlled amount of PDMS is infused into the freeze-dried foam resulting into a very rigid structure with improved mechanical properties, such as tensile plasticity and toughness. The PDMS wets the graphene oxide sheets and acts like a glue bonding PDMS and GO sheets. In order to obtain further insights on mechanisms behind the enhanced mechanical pGO response we carried out fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Based on MD results, we build up a structural model that can explain the experimentally observed mechanical behavior.
  • A novel crystal configuration of sandwiched S-Mo-Se structure (Janus SMoSe) at the monolayer limit has been synthesized and carefully characterized in this work. By controlled sulfurization of monolayer MoSe2 the top layer of selenium atoms are substituted by sulfur atoms while the bottom selenium layer remains intact. The peculiar structure of this new material is systematically investigated by Raman, photoluminescence and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and confirmed by transmission-electron microscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. Density-functional theory calculations are performed to better understand the Raman vibration modes and electronic structures of the Janus SMoSe monolayer, which are found to correlate well with corresponding experimental results. Finally, high basal plane hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) activity is discovered for the Janus monolayer and DFT calculation implies that the activity originates from the synergistic effect of the intrinsic defects and structural strain inherent in the Janus structure.
  • Band gap tuning in two-dimensional transitional metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) is crucial in fabricating new optoelectronic devices. High resolution photoluminescence (PL) microscopy is needed for accurate band gap characterization. We performed tip-enhanced photoluminescence (TEPL) measurements of monolayer MoSe2 with nanoscale spatial resolution, providing an improved characterization of the band gap correlated with the topography compared with the conventional far field spectroscopy. We also observed PL shifts at the edges and investigated the spatial dependence of the TEPL enhancement factors.
  • With materials approaching the 2d limit yielding many exciting systems with intriguing physical properties and promising technological functionalities, understanding and engineering magnetic order in nanoscale, layered materials is generating keen interest. One such material is V$_{5}$S$_{8}$, a metal with an antiferromagnetic ground state below the N\'eel temperature $T_{N} \sim$ 32 K and a prominent spin-flop signature in the magnetoresistance (MR) when $H||c \sim$ 4.2 T. Here we study nanoscale-thickness single crystals of V$_{5}$S$_{8}$, focusing on temperatures close to $T_{N}$ and the evolution of material properties in response to systematic reduction in crystal thickness. Transport measurements just below $T_{N}$ reveal magnetic hysteresis that we ascribe to a metamagnetic transition, the first-order magnetic field-driven breakdown of the ordered state. The reduction of crystal thickness to $\sim$ 10 nm coincides with systematic changes in the magnetic response: $T_{N}$ falls, implying that antiferromagnetism is suppressed; and while the spin-flop signature remains, the hysteresis disappears, implying that the metamagnetic transition becomes second order as the thickness approaches the 2d limit. This work demonstrates that single crystals of magnetic materials with nanometer thicknesses are promising systems for future studies of magnetism in reduced dimensionality and quantum phase transitions.
  • Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier and key agent for many industrial chemical processes1. One method for generating hydrogen sustainably is via the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), in which electrochemical reduction of protons is mediated by an appropriate catalyst-traditionally, an expensive platinum-group metal. Scalable production requires catalyst alternatives that can lower materials or processing costs while retaining the highest possible activity. Strategies have included dilute alloying of Pt2 or employing less expensive transition metal alloys, compounds or heterostructures (e.g., NiMo, metal phosphides, pyrite sulfides, encapsulated metal nanoparticles)3-5. Recently, low-cost, layered transition-metal dichalcogenides (MX2)6 based on molybdenum and tungsten have attracted substantial interest as alternative HER catalysts7-11. These materials have high intrinsic per-site HER activity; however, a significant challenge is the limited density of active sites, which are concentrated at the layer edges.8,10,11. Here we use theory to unravel electronic factors underlying catalytic activity on MX2 surfaces, and leverage the understanding to report group-5 MX2 (H-TaS2 and H-NbS2) electrocatalysts whose performance instead derives from highly active basal-plane sites. Beyond excellent catalytic activity, they are found to exhibit an unusual ability to optimize their morphology for enhanced charge transfer and accessibility of active sites as the HER proceeds. This leads to long cycle life and practical advantages for scalable processing. The resulting performance is comparable to Pt and exceeds all reported MX2 candidates.
  • The monolithic integration of electronics and photonics has attracted enormous attention due to its potential applications. However, the realization of such hybrid circuits has remained a challenge because it requires optical communication at nanometer scales. A major challenge to this integration is the identification of a suitable material. After discussing the material aspect of the challenge, we identified atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) as a perfect material platform to implement the circuit. The selection of TMDs is based on their very distinct property: monolayer TMDs are able to emit and absorb light at the same wavelength determined by direct exciton transitions. To prove the concept, we fabricated simple devices consisting of silver nanowires as plasmonic waveguides and monolayer TMDs as active optoelectronic media. Using photoexcitation, direct optical imaging and spectral analysis, we demonstrated generation and detection of surface plasmon polaritons by monolayer TMDs. Regarded as novel materials for electronics and photonics, transition metal dichalcogenides are expected to find new applications in next generation integrated circuits.
  • We report a systematic study of coherent spin precession and spin dephasing in electron-doped monolayer MoS$_2$. Using time-resolved Kerr rotation spectroscopy and applied in-plane magnetic fields, a nanosecond-timescale Larmor spin precession signal commensurate with $g$-factor $|g_0|\simeq 1.86$ is observed in several different MoS$_2$ samples grown by chemical vapor deposition. The dephasing rate of this oscillatory signal increases linearly with magnetic field, suggesting that the coherence arises from a sub-ensemble of localized electron spins having an inhomogeneously-broadened distribution of $g$-factors, $g_0 + \Delta g$. In contrast to $g_0$, $\Delta g$ is sample-dependent and ranges from 0.042 to 0.115.
  • The recently-discovered monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) provide a fertile playground to explore new coupled spin-valley physics. Although robust spin and valley degrees of freedom are inferred from polarized photoluminescence (PL) experiments, PL timescales are necessarily constrained by short-lived (3-100ps) electron-hole recombination. Direct probes of spin/valley polarization dynamics of resident carriers in electron (or hole) doped TMDCs, which may persist long after recombination ceases, are at an early stage. Here we directly measure the coupled spin-valley dynamics in electron-doped MoS_2 and WS_2 monolayers using optical Kerr spectroscopy, and unambiguously reveal very long electron spin lifetimes exceeding 3ns at 5K (2-3 orders of magnitude longer than typical exciton recombination times). In contrast with conventional III-V or II-VI semiconductors, spin relaxation accelerates rapidly in small transverse magnetic fields. Supported by a model of coupled spin-valley dynamics, these results indicate a novel mechanism of itinerant electron spin dephasing in the rapidly-fluctuating internal spin-orbit field in TMDCs, driven by fast intervalley scattering. Additionally, a long-lived spin coherence is observed at lower energies, commensurate with localized states. These studies provide crucial insight into the physics underpinning spin and valley dynamics of resident electrons in atomically-thin TMDCs.
  • A fundamental understanding of the intrinsic optoelectronic properties of atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) is crucial for its integration into high performance semiconductor devices. Here, we investigate the transport properties of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) under photo-excitation using correlated scanning photocurrent microscopy and photoluminescence imaging. We examined the effect of local phase transformation underneath the metal electrodes on the generation of photocurrent across the channel length with diffraction-limited spatial resolution. While maximum photocurrent generation occurs at the Schottky contacts of semiconducting (2H-phase) MoS2, after the metallic phase transformation (1T-phase), the photocurrent peak is observed towards the center of the device channel, suggesting a strong reduction of native Schottky barriers. Analysis using the bias and position dependence of the photocurrent indicates that the Schottky barrier heights are few meV for 1T- and ~200 meV for 2H-contacted devices. We also demonstrate that a reduction of native Schottky barriers in a 1T device enhances the photo responsivity by more than one order of magnitude, a crucial parameter in achieving high performance optoelectronic devices. The obtained results pave a pathway for the fundamental understanding of intrinsic optoelectronic properties of atomically thin TMDs where Ohmic contacts are necessary for achieving high efficiency devices with low power consumption.
  • Phosphorene, an elemental 2D material, which is the monolayer of black phosphorus, has been mechanically exfoliated recently. In its bulk form, black phosphorus shows high carrier mobility (~10000 cm2/Vs) and a ~0.3 eV direct bandgap. Well-behaved p-type field-effect transistors with mobilities of up to 1000 cm2/Vs, as well as phototransistors, have been demonstrated on few-layer black phosphorus, showing its promise for electronics and optoelectronics applications due to its high hole mobility and thickness-dependence direct bandgap. However, p-n junctions, the basic building blocks of modern electronic and optoelectronic devices, have not yet been realized based on black phosphorus. In this paper, we demonstrate a gate tunable p-n diode based on a p-type black phosphorus/n-type monolayer MoS2 van der Waals p-n heterojunction. Upon illumination, these ultra-thin p-n diodes show a maximum photodetection responsivity of 418 mA/W at the wavelength of 633 nm, and photovoltaic energy conversion with an external quantum efficiency of 0.3%. These p-n diodes show promise for broadband photodetection and solar energy harvesting.
  • In this article, we study the properties of metal contacts to single-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) crystals, revealing the nature of switching mechanism in MoS2 transistors. On investigating transistor behavior as contact length changes, we find that the contact resistivity for metal/MoS2 junctions is defined by contact area instead of contact width. The minimum gate dependent transfer length is ~0.63 {\mu}m in the on-state for metal (Ti) contacted single-layer MoS2. These results reveal that MoS2 transistors are Schottky barrier transistors, where the on/off states are switched by the tuning the Schottky barriers at contacts. The effective barrier heights for source and drain barriers are primarily controlled by gate and drain biases, respectively. We discuss the drain induced barrier narrowing effect for short channel devices, which may reduce the influence of large contact resistance for MoS2 Schottky barrier transistors at the channel length scaling limit.
  • We present a combined experimental and computational study of two-dimensional molybdenum disulfde (MoS2) and the effect of temperature on the frequency shifts of the Raman-active E2g and A1g modes in the monolayer. While both peaks show an expected red-shift with increasing temperature, the frequency shift is larger for the A1g more than for the E2g mode. This is in contrast to previously reported bulk behavior, in which the E2g mode shows a larger frequency shift with temperature. The temperature dependence of these phonon shifts is attributed to the anharmonic contributions to the ionic interaction potential in the two-dimensional system.
  • The large family of layered transition-metal dichalcogenides is widely believed to constitute a second family of two-dimensional (2D) semiconducting materials that can be used to create novel devices that complement those based on graphene. In many cases these materials have shown a transition from an indirect bandgap in the bulk to a direct bandgap in monolayer systems. In this work we experimentally show that folding a 1H molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) layer results in a turbostratic stack with enhanced photoluminescence quantum yield and a significant shift to the blue by 90 meV. This is in contrast to the expected 2H-MoS2 band structure characteristics, which include an indirect gap and quenched photoluminescence. We present a theoretical explanation to the origin of this behavior in terms of exciton screening.
  • We show that the lack of inversion symmetry in monolayer MoS2 allows strong optical second harmonic generation. Second harmonic of an 810-nm pulse is generated in a mechanically exfoliated monolayer, with a nonlinear susceptibility on the order of 1E-7 m/V. The susceptibility reduces by a factor of seven in trilayers, and by about two orders of magnitude in even layers. A proof-of-principle second harmonic microscopy measurement is performed on samples grown by chemical vapor deposition, which illustrates potential applications of this effect in fast and non-invasive detection of crystalline orientation, thickness uniformity, layer stacking, and single-crystal domain size of atomically thin films of MoS2 and similar materials.
  • Monolayer Molybdenum Disulfide (MoS2) with a direct band gap of 1.8 eV is a promising two-dimensional material with a potential to surpass graphene in next generation nanoelectronic applications. In this letter, we synthesize monolayer MoS2 on Si/SiO2 substrate via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method and comprehensively study the device performance based on dual-gated MoS2 field-effect transistors. Over 100 devices are studied to obtain a statistical description of device performance in CVD MoS2. We examine and scale down the channel length of the transistors to 100 nm and achieve record high drain current of 62.5 mA/mm in CVD monolayer MoS2 film ever reported. We further extract the intrinsic contact resistance of low work function metal Ti on monolayer CVD MoS2 with an expectation value of 175 {\Omega}.mm, which can be significantly decreased to 10 {\Omega}.mm by appropriate gating. Finally, field-effect mobilities ({\mu}FE) of the carriers at various channel lengths are obtained. By taking the impact of contact resistance into account, an average and maximum intrinsic {\mu}FE is estimated to be 13.0 and 21.6 cm2/Vs in monolayer CVD MoS2 films, respectively.
  • Single layered molybdenum disulfide with a direct bandgap is a promising two-dimensional material that goes beyond graphene for next generation nanoelectronics. Here, we report the controlled vapor phase synthesis of molybdenum disulfide atomic layers and elucidate a fundamental mechanism for the nucleation, growth, and grain boundary formation in its crystalline monolayers. Furthermore, a nucleation-controlled strategy is established to systematically promote the formation of large-area single- and few-layered films. The atomic structure and morphology of the grains and their boundaries in the polycrystalline molybdenum disulfide atomic layers are examined and first-principles calculations are applied to investigate their energy landscape. The electrical properties of the atomic layers are examined and the role of grain boundaries is evaluated. The uniformity in thickness, large grain sizes, and excellent electrical performance of these materials signify the high quality and scalable synthesis of the molybdenum disulfide atomic layers.
  • Monolayer Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), a two-dimensional crystal with a direct bandgap, is a promising candidate for 2D nanoelectronic devices complementing graphene. There have been recent attempts to produce MoS2 layers via chemical and mechanical exfoliation of bulk material. Here we demonstrate the large area growth of MoS2 atomic layers on SiO2 substrates by a scalable chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The as-prepared samples can either be readily utilized for further device fabrication or be easily released from SiO2 and transferred to arbitrary substrates. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy on the as grown films of MoS2 indicate that the number of layers range from single layer to a few layers. Our results on the direct growth of MoS2 layers on dielectric leading to facile device fabrication possibilities show the expanding set of useful 2D atomic layers, on the heels of graphene, which can be controllably synthesized and manipulated for many applications.