• We derive the phonon dynamics of magnetic metals in the presence of strong spin-orbit coupling. We show that both a dissipationless viscosity and a dissipative viscosity arise in the dynamics. While the dissipationless viscosity splits the dispersion of left-handed and right-handed circularly polarized phonons, the dissipative viscosity damps them differently, inducing circular phonon dichroism. The effect offers a new degree of manipulation of phonons, i.e., the control of the phonon polarization. We investigate the effect in Weyl semimetals. We find that there exists strong circular phonon dichroism in Weyl semimetals breaking both the time-reversal and the inversion symmetry, making them potential materials for realizing the acoustic circular polarizer.
  • Conventional wisdom had long held that a composite particle behaves just like an ordinary Newtonian particle. In this paper, we derive the effective dynamics of a type-I Wigner crystal of composite particles directly from its microscopic wave function. It indicates that the composite particles are subjected to a Berry curvature in the momentum space as well as an emergent dissipationless viscosity. Therefore, contrary to the general belief, composite particles follow the more general Sundaram-Niu dynamics instead of the ordinary Newtonian one. We show that the presence of the Berry curvature is an inevitable feature for a dynamics consistent with the dipole picture of composite particles and Kohn's theorem. Based on the dynamics, we determine the dispersions of magneto-phonon excitations numerically. We find an emergent magneto-roton mode which signifies the composite-particle nature of the Wigner crystal. It occurs at frequencies much lower than the magnetic cyclotron frequency and has a vanishing oscillator strength in the long wavelength limit.
  • We study the magnetoresistance of an ultrahigh mobility GaAs/AlGaAs two-dimensional electron sample in a weak magnetic field under low-frequency (f < 20 GHz) microwave (MW) irradiation. We observe that with decreasing MW frequency, microwave induced resistance oscillations (MIRO) damp and multi-photon processes become dominant. At very low MW frequency (f < 4 GHz), MIRO disappears gradually and a new SdH-like oscillation develops. The analysis indicates that the new oscillation may originate from alternating Hall-field induced resistance oscillations (ac-HIRO), or can be viewed as a multi-photon process of MIRO in low MW frequency limit. Our findings bridge the non-equilibrium states of MIRO and HIRO, which can be brought into a frame of quantum tunneling junction model.
  • We propose a (4+1) dimensional Chern-Simons field theoretical description of the fractional quantum Hall effect. It suggests that composite fermions reside on a momentum manifold with a nonzero Chern number. Based on derivations from microscopic wave functions, we further show that the momentum manifold has a uniformly distributed Berry curvature. As a result, composite fermions do not follow the ordinary Newtonian dynamics as commonly believed, but the more general symplectic one. For a Landau level with the particle-hole symmetry, the theory correctly predicts its Hall conductance at half-filling as well as the symmetry between an electron filling fraction and its hole counterpart.
  • We investigate the spin-orbit coupling effect in a two-dimensional Wigner crystal. We show that sufficiently strong spin-orbit coupling and an appropriate sign of g-factor could transform the Wigner crystal to a topological phonon system. We demonstrate the existence of chiral phonon edge modes in finite size samples, as well as the robustness of the modes in the topological phase. We explore the possibility of realizing the topological phonon system in two-dimensional Wigner crystals confined in semiconductor quantum wells/heterostructure. We find that the spin-orbit coupling is too weak for driving a topological phase transition in these systems. We argue that one may look for the topological phonon system in correlated Wigner crystals with emergent effective spin-orbit coupling.
  • We study effects of infrared radiations on a two-dimensional BCS superconductor coupled with a normal metal substrate through a tunneling barrier. The phase transition conditions are analyzed by inspecting stability of the system against perturbations of pairing potentials. We find an oscillating gap phase with a frequency not directly related to the radiation frequency but resulting from the asymmetry of electron density of states of the system as well as the tunneling amplitude. When such a superconductor is in contact with another superconductor, it will give rise to an unusual alternating Josephson current.
  • We establish a variational principle for properly mapping a fractional quantum Hall (FQH) state to a fractional Chern insulator (FCI). We find that the mapping has a gauge freedom which could generate a class of FCI ground state wave functions appropriate for different forms of interactions. Therefore, the gauge should be fixed by a variational principle that minimizes the interaction energy of the FCI model. For a soft and isotropic electron-electron interaction, the principle leads to a gauge coinciding with that for maximally localized \emph{two-dimensional} projected Wannier functions of a Landau level.
  • We show that a weak hexagonal periodic potential could transform a two-dimensional electron gas with an even-denominator magnetic filling factor to a quantum anomalous Hall insulator of composite fermions, giving rise to fractionally quantized Hall effect. The system provides a realization of the Haldane honeycomb-net model, albeit in a composite fermion system. We further propose a trial wave function for the state, and numerically evaluate its relative stability against the competing Hofstadter state. Possible sets of experimental parameters are proposed.
  • We study the valley-dependent magnetic and transport properties of massive Dirac fermions in multivalley systems such as the transition metal dichalcogenides. The asymmetry of the zeroth Landau level between valleys and the enhanced magnetic susceptibility can be attributed to the different orbital magnetic moment tied with each valley. This allows the valley polarization to be controlled by tuning the external magnetic field and the doping level. As a result of this magnetic field induced valley polarization, there exists an extra contribution to the ordinary Hall effect. All these effects can be captured by a low energy effective theory with a valley-orbit coupling term.
  • We analyze various possible superconducting pairing states and their relative stabilities in lightly doped graphene. We show that, when inter-sublattice electron-electron attractive interaction dominates and Fermi level is close to Dirac points, the system will favor intra-valley spin-triplet $p+\mathrm{i}p$ pairing state. Based on the novel pairing state, we further propose a scheme for doing topological quantum computation in graphene by engineering local strain fields and external magnetic fields.
  • Electrons/atoms can flow without dissipation at low temperature in superconductors/superfluids. The phenomenon known as superconductivity/superfluidity is one of the most important discoveries of modern physics, and is not only fundamentally important, but also essential for many real applications. An interesting question is: can we have a superconductor for heat current, in which energy can flow without dissipation? Here we show that heat superconductivity is indeed possible. We will show how the possibility of the heat superconductivity emerges in theory, and how the heat superconductor can be constructed using recently proposed time crystals. The underlying simple physics is also illustrated. If the possibility could be realized, it would not be difficult to speculate various potential applications, from energy tele-transportation to cooling of information devices.
  • Conventional electronics are based invariably on the intrinsic degrees of freedom of an electron, namely, its charge and spin. The exploration of novel electronic degrees of freedom has important implications in both basic quantum physics and advanced information technology. Valley as a new electronic degree of freedom has received considerable attention in recent years. In this paper, we develop the theory of spin and valley physics of an antiferromagnetic honeycomb lattice. We show that by coupling the valley degree of freedom to antiferromagnetic order, there is an emergent electronic degree of freedom characterized by the product of spin and valley indices, which leads to spin-valley dependent optical selection rule and Berry curvature-induced topological quantum transport. These properties will enable optical polarization in the spin-valley space, and electrical detection/manipulation through the induced spin, valley and charge fluxes. The domain walls of an antiferromagnetic honeycomb lattice harbors valley-protected edge states that support spin-dependent transport. Finally, we employ first principles calculations to show that the proposed optoelectronic properties can be realized in antiferromagnetic manganese chalcogenophosphates (MnPX_3, X = S, Se) in monolayer form.
  • The total reciprocal space magnetic flux threading through a closed Fermi surface is a topological invariant for a three-dimensional metal. For a Weyl metal, the invariant is non-zero for each of its Fermi surfaces. We show that such an invariant can be related to magneto-valley-transport effect, in which an external magnetic field can induce a valley current. We further show that a strain field can drive an electric current, and the effect is dictated by a second class Chern invariant. These connections open the pathway to observe the hidden topological invariants in metallic systems.
  • We establish the general phonon dynamics of magnetic solids by incorporating the Mead-Truhlar correction in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The effective magnetic-field acting on the phonons naturally emerges, giving rise to the phonon Hall effect. A general formula of the intrinsic phonon Hall conductivity is obtained by using the corrected Kubo formula with the energy magnetization contribution incorporated properly. The resulting phonon Hall conductivity is fully determined by the phonon Berry curvature and the dispersions. Based on the formula, the topological phonon system could be rigorously defined. In the low temperature regime, we predict that the phonon Hall conductivity is proportional to $T^{3}$ for the ordinary phonon systems, while that for the topological phonon systems has the linear $T$ dependence with the quantized temperature coefficient.
  • We study the possibility of realizing topological phases in graphene with randomly distributed adsorbates. When graphene is subjected to periodically distributed adatoms, the enhanced spin-orbit couplings can result in various topological phases. However, at certain adatom coverages, the intervalley scattering renders the system a trivial insulator. By employing a finite-size scaling approach and Landauer-B\"{u}ttiker formula, we show that the randomization of adatom distribution greatly weakens the intervalley scattering, but plays a negligible role in spin-orbit couplings. Consequently, such a randomization turns graphene from a trivial insulator into a topological state.
  • A two-dimensional honeycomb lattice harbors a pair of inequivalent valleys in the k-space electronic structure, in the vicinities of the vertices of a hexagonal Brillouin zone, K}$_{\pm}$. It is particularly appealing to exploit this emergent degree of freedom of charge carriers, in what is termed "valleytronics", if charge carrier imbalance between the valleys can be achieved. The physics of valley polarization will make possible electronic devices such as valley filter and valley valve, and optoelectronic Hall devices, all very promising for next-generation electronic and optoelectronic applications. The key challenge lies with achieving valley imbalance, of which a convincing demonstration in a two-dimensional honeycomb structure remains evasive, while there are only a handful of examples for other materials. We show here, using first principles calculations, that monolayer MoS_2, a novel two-dimensional semiconductor with a 1.8 eV direct band gap, is an ideal material for valleytronics by valley- selective circular dichroism, with ensuing valley polarization and valley Hall effect.
  • We obtain a set of general formulae for determining magnetizations, including the usual electromagnetic magnetization as well as the gravitomagnetic energy magnetization. The magnetization corrections to the thermal transport coefficients are explicitly demonstrated. Our theory provides a systematic approach for properly evaluating the thermal transport coefficients of magnetic systems, eliminating the unphysical divergence from the direct application of the Kubo formula. For an anomalous Hall system, the corrected thermal Hall conductivity obeys the Wiedemann-Franz law.
  • We investigate the effects of spin-flip scattering on the Hall transport and spectral properties of gapped Dirac fermions. We find that in the weak scattering regime, the Berry curvature distribution is dramatically compressed in the electronic energy spectrum, becoming singular at band edges. As a result the Hall conductivity has a sudden jump (or drop) of $e^2/2h$ when the Fermi energy sweeps across the band edges, and otherwise is a constant quantized in units of $e^2/2h$. In parallel, spectral properties such as the density of states and spin polarization are also greatly enhanced at band edges. Possible experimental methods to detect these effects are discussed.
  • A magnetoconductivity formula is presented for the surface states of a magnetically doped topological insulator. It reveals a competing effect of weak localization and weak antilocalization in quantum transport when an energy gap is opened at the Dirac point by magnetic doping. It is found that, while random magnetic scattering always drives the system from the symplectic to the unitary class, the gap could induce a crossover from weak antilocalization to weak localization, tunable by the Fermi energy or the gap. This crossover presents a unique feature characterizing the surface states of a topological insulator with the gap opened at the Dirac point in the quantum diffusion regime.
  • We study the magnetic and transport properties of epitaxial graphene films in this letter. We predict enhanced signal of magnetic susceptibility and relate it to the intrinsic valley magnetic moments. There is also an anomalous contribution to the ordinary Hall effect, which is due to the valley dependent Berry phase or valley-orbit coupling.
  • We show that a chiral $f+if$-wave superconducting pairing may be induced in the lowest heavy hole band of a hole-doped semiconductor thin film through proximity contact with an \textit{s}-wave superconductor. The chirality of the pairing originates from the $3\pi $ Berry phase accumulated for a heavy hole moving along a close path on the Fermi surface. There exist three chiral gapless Majorana edge states, in consistence with the chiral $f+if$% -wave pairing. We show the existence of zero energy Majorana fermions in vortices in the semiconductor-superconductor heterostructure by solving the Bogoliubov-de-Gennes equations numerically as well as analytically in the strong confinement limit.
  • We propose a surface-edge state theory for half quantized Hall conductance of surface states in topological insulators. The gap opening of a single Dirac cone for the surface states in a weak magnetic field is demonstrated. We find a new surface state resides on the surface edges and carries chiral edge current, resulting in a half-quantized Hall conductance in a four-terminal setup. We also give a physical interpretation of the half quantized conductance by showing that this state is the product of splitting of a boundary bound state of massive Dirac fermions which carries a conductance quantum.
  • High-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy measurements have been carried out on an optimally doped cuprate Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+{\delta}. The momentum-dependent linewidth and the dispersion of an A1 optical phonon are obtained. Based on these data as well as the detailed knowledge of the electronic structure from angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we develop a scheme to determine the full structure of electron-phonon coupling for a specific phonon mode, thus providing a general method for directly resolving the EPC matrix element in systems with anisotropic electronic structures.
  • Super-high resolution laser-based angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements have been carried out on a heavily overdoped (Bi,Pb)2Sr2CuO6 (Tc> 5 K) superconductor. Taking advantage of the high-precision data on the subtle change of the quasi-particle dispersion at different temperatures, we develop a general procedure to determine the bare band dispersion and extract the bosonic spectral function quantitatively. Our results show unambiguously that the 70 meV nodal kink is due to the electron coupling with the multiple phonon modes, with a large mass enhancement factor Lamda= 0.42 even in the heavily over-doped regime.
  • Ferromagnet-ferroelectric-metal superlattices are proposed to realize the large room-temperature magnetoelectric effect. Spin dependent electron screening is the fundamental mechanism at the microscopic level. We also predict an electric control of magnetization in this structure. The naturally broken inversion symmetry in our tri-component structure introduces a magnetoelectric coupling energy of $P M^2$. Such a magnetoelectric coupling effect is general in ferromagnet-ferroelectric heterostructures, independent of particular chemical or physical bonding, and will play an important role in the field of multiferroics.