• The ESA mission "Space Optical Clock" project aims at operating an optical lattice clock on the ISS in approximately 2023. The scientific goals of the mission are to perform tests of fundamental physics, to enable space-assisted relativistic geodesy and to intercompare optical clocks on the ground using microwave and optical links. The performance goal of the space clock is less than $1 \times 10^{-17}$ uncertainty and $1 \times 10^{-15} {\tau}^{-1/2}$ instability. Within an EU-FP7-funded project, a strontium optical lattice clock demonstrator has been developed. Goal performances are instability below $1 \times 10^{-15} {\tau}^{-1/2}$ and fractional inaccuracy $5 \times 10^{-17}$. For the design of the clock, techniques and approaches suitable for later space application are used, such as modular design, diode lasers, low power consumption subunits, and compact dimensions. The Sr clock apparatus is fully operational, and the clock transition in $^{88}$Sr was observed with linewidth as small as 9 Hz.
  • We present a new single-ion endcap trap for high precision spectroscopy that has been designed to minimize ion-environment interactions. We describe the design in detail and then characterize the working trap using a single trapped 171 Yb ion. Excess micromotion has been eliminated to the resolution of the detection method and the trap exhibits an anomalous phonon heating rate of d<n> /dt = 24 +30/-24 per second. The thermal properties of the trap structure have also been measured with an effective temperature rise at the ion's position of 0.14 +/- 0.14 K. The small perturbations to the ion caused by this trap make it suitable to be used for an optical frequency standard with fractional uncertainties below the 10^-18 level.
  • Ultra-precise optical clocks in space will allow new studies in fundamental physics and astronomy. Within an European Space Agency (ESA) program, the Space Optical Clocks (SOC) project aims to install and to operate an optical lattice clock on the International Space Station (ISS) towards the end of this decade. It would be a natural follow-on to the ACES mission, improving its performance by at least one order of magnitude. The payload is planned to include an optical lattice clock, as well as a frequency comb, a microwave link, and an optical link for comparisons of the ISS clock with ground clocks located in several countries and continents. Within the EU-FP7-SPACE-2010-1 project no. 263500, during the years 2011-2015 a compact, modular and robust strontium lattice optical clock demonstrator has been developed. Goal performance is a fractional frequency instability below 1x10^{-15}, tau^{-1/2} and a fractional inaccuracy below 5x10^{-17}. Here we describe the current status of the apparatus' development, including the laser subsystems. Robust preparation of cold {88}^Sr atoms in a second stage magneto-optical trap (MOT) is achieved.
  • Singly-ionized ytterbium, with ultra-narrow optical clock transitions at 467 nm and 436 nm, is a convenient system for the realization of optical atomic clocks and tests of present-day variation of fundamental constants. We present the first direct measurement of the frequency ratio of these two clock transitions, without reference to a cesium primary standard, and using the same single ion of 171Yb+. The absolute frequencies of both transitions are also presented, each with a relative standard uncertainty of $6\times 10^{-16}$. Combining our results with those from other experiments, we report a three-fold improvement in the constraint on the time-variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio, $\dot{\mu}/{\mu} = 0.2(1.1)\times 10^{-16}$ year$^{-1}$, along with an improved constraint on time-variation of the fine structure constant, $\dot{\alpha}/{\alpha} = -0.7(2.1)\times 10^{-17}$ year$^{-1}$.
  • The theory of general relativity describes macroscopic phenomena driven by the influence of gravity while quantum mechanics brilliantly accounts for microscopic effects. Despite their tremendous individual success, a complete unification of fundamental interactions is missing and remains one of the most challenging and important quests in modern theoretical physics. The STE-QUEST satellite mission, proposed as a medium-size mission within the Cosmic Vision program of the European Space Agency (ESA), aims for testing general relativity with high precision in two experiments by performing a measurement of the gravitational redshift of the Sun and the Moon by comparing terrestrial clocks, and by performing a test of the Universality of Free Fall of matter waves in the gravitational field of Earth comparing the trajectory of two Bose-Einstein condensates of Rb85 and Rb87. The two ultracold atom clouds are monitored very precisely thanks to techniques of atom interferometry. This allows to reach down to an uncertainty in the E\"otv\"os parameter of at least 2x10E-15. In this paper, we report about the results of the phase A mission study of the atom interferometer instrument covering the description of the main payload elements, the atomic source concept, and the systematic error sources.
  • In this paper we discuss in detail an experimental scheme to test the universality of free fall (UFF) with a differential $^{87}$Rb / $^{85}$Rb atom interferometer applicable for extended free fall of several seconds in the frame of the STE-QUEST mission. This analysis focuses on suppression of noise and error sources which would limit the accuracy of a violation measurement. We show that the choice of atomic species and the correctly matched parameters of the interferometer sequence are of utmost importance to suppress leading order phase shifts. In conclusion we will show the expected performance of $2$ parts in $10^{15}$ of such an interferometer for a test of the UFF.
  • Alkaline-earth-metal atoms exhibit long-range dipolar interactions, which are generated via the coherent exchange of photons on the 3P_0-3D_1-transition of the triplet manifold. In case of bosonic strontium, which we discuss here, this transition has a wavelength of 2.7 \mu m and a dipole moment of 2.46 Debye, and there exists a magic wavelength permitting the creation of optical lattices that are identical for the states 3P_0 and 3D_1. This interaction enables the realization and study of mixtures of hard-core lattice bosons featuring long-range hopping, with tuneable disorder and anisotropy. We derive the many-body Master equation, investigate the dynamics of excitation transport and analyze spectroscopic signatures stemming from coherent long-range interactions and collective dissipation. Our results show that lattice gases of alkaline-earth-metal atoms permit the creation of long-lived collective atomic states and constitute a simple and versatile platform for the exploration of many-body systems with long-range interactions. As such, they represent an alternative to current related efforts employing Rydberg gases, atoms with large magnetic moment, or polar molecules.
  • Atom interferometers covering macroscopic domains of space-time are a spectacular manifestation of the wave nature of matter. Due to their unique coherence properties, Bose-Einstein condensates are ideal sources for an atom interferometer in extended free fall. In this paper we report on the realization of an asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer operated with a Bose-Einstein condensate in microgravity. The resulting interference pattern is similar to the one in the far-field of a double-slit and shows a linear scaling with the time the wave packets expand. We employ delta-kick cooling in order to enhance the signal and extend our atom interferometer. Our experiments demonstrate the high potential of interferometers operated with quantum gases for probing the fundamental concepts of quantum mechanics and general relativity.
  • The use of ultra-precise optical clocks in space ("master clocks") will allow for a range of new applications in the fields of fundamental physics (tests of Einstein's theory of General Relativity, time and frequency metrology by means of the comparison of distant terrestrial clocks), geophysics (mapping of the gravitational potential of Earth), and astronomy (providing local oscillators for radio ranging and interferometry in space). Within the ELIPS-3 program of ESA, the "Space Optical Clocks" (SOC) project aims to install and to operate an optical lattice clock on the ISS towards the end of this decade, as a natural follow-on to the ACES mission, improving its performance by at least one order of magnitude. The payload is planned to include an optical lattice clock, as well as a frequency comb, a microwave link, and an optical link for comparisons of the ISS clock with ground clocks located in several countries and continents. Undertaking a necessary step towards optical clocks in space, the EU-FP7-SPACE-2010-1 project no. 263500 (SOC2) (2011-2015) aims at two "engineering confidence", accurate transportable lattice optical clock demonstrators having relative frequency instability below 1\times10^-15 at 1 s integration time and relative inaccuracy below 5\times10^-17. This goal performance is about 2 and 1 orders better in instability and inaccuracy, respectively, than today's best transportable clocks. The devices will be based on trapped neutral ytterbium and strontium atoms. One device will be a breadboard. The two systems will be validated in laboratory environments and their performance will be established by comparison with laboratory optical clocks and primary frequency standards. In this paper we present the project and the results achieved during the first year.
  • We demonstrate the first guiding of cold atoms through a 88 mm long piece of photonic band gap fiber. The guiding potential is created by a far-off resonance dipole trap propagating inside the fiber with a hollow core of 12 mu m. We load the fiber from a dark spot 85-Rb magneto optical trap and observe a peak flux of more than 10^5 atoms/s at a velocity of 1.5 m/s. With an additional reservoir optical dipole trap, a constant atomic flux of 1.5 10^4 atoms/s is sustained for more than 150\,ms. These results open up interesting possibilities to study nonlinear light-matter interaction in a nearly one-dimensional geometry and pave the way for guided matter wave interferometry.
  • Over the last years the exciting developments in the field of ultracold atoms confined in optical lattices have led to numerous theoretical proposals devoted to the quantum simulation of problems e.g. known from condensed matter physics. Many of those ideas demand for experimental environments with non-cubic lattice geometries. In this paper we report on the implementation of a versatile three-beam lattice allowing for the generation of triangular as well as hexagonal optical lattices. As an important step the superfluid-Mott insulator (SF-MI) quantum phase transition has been observed and investigated in detail in this lattice geometry for the first time. In addition to this we study the physics of spinor Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) in the presence of the triangular optical lattice potential, especially spin changing dynamics across the SF-MI transition. Our results suggest that below the SF-MI phase transition, a well-established mean-field model describes the observed data when renormalizing the spin-dependent interaction. Interestingly this opens new perspectives for a lattice driven tuning of a spin dynamics resonance occurring through the interplay of quadratic Zeeman effect and spin-dependent interaction. We finally discuss further lattice configurations which can be realized with our setup.
  • We summarise the scientific and technological aspects of the SAGAS (Search for Anomalous Gravitation using Atomic Sensors) project, submitted to ESA in June 2007 in response to the Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 call for proposals. The proposed mission aims at flying highly sensitive atomic sensors (optical clock, cold atom accelerometer, optical link) on a Solar System escape trajectory in the 2020 to 2030 time-frame. SAGAS has numerous science objectives in fundamental physics and Solar System science, for example numerous tests of general relativity and the exploration of the Kuiper belt. The combination of highly sensitive atomic sensors and of the laser link well adapted for large distances will allow measurements with unprecedented accuracy and on scales never reached before. We present the proposed mission in some detail, with particular emphasis on the science goals and associated measurements.
  • Solitons are among the most distinguishing fundamental excitations in a wide range of non-linear systems such as water in narrow channels, high speed optical communication, molecular biology and astrophysics. Stabilized by a balance between spreading and focusing, solitons are wavepackets, which share some exceptional generic features like form-stability and particle-like properties. Ultra-cold quantum gases represent very pure and well-controlled non-linear systems, therefore offering unique possibilities to study soliton dynamics. Here we report on the first observation of long-lived dark and dark-bright solitons with lifetimes of up to several seconds as well as their dynamics in highly stable optically trapped $^{87}$Rb Bose-Einstein condensates. In particular, our detailed studies of dark and dark-bright soliton oscillations reveal the particle-like nature of these collective excitations for the first time. In addition, we discuss the collision between these two types of solitary excitations in Bose-Einstein condensates.
  • Mixtures of bosonic and fermionic atoms in optical lattices provide a promising arena to study strongly correlated systems. In experiments realizing such mixtures in the quantum degenerate regime the temperature is a key parameter. In this work, we investigate the intrinsic heating and cooling effects due to an entropy-preserving raising of the optical lattice potential. We analyze this process, identify the generic behavior valid for a wide range of parameters, and discuss it quantitatively for the recent experiments with 87Rb and 40K atoms. In the absence of a lattice, we treat the bosons in the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov-Popov-approximation, including the fermions in a self-consistent mean field interaction. In the presence of the full three-dimensional lattice, we use a strong coupling expansion. As a result of the presence of the fermions, the temperature of the mixture after the lattice ramp-up is always higher than for the pure bosonic case. This sheds light onto a key point in the analysis of recent experiments.
  • We report on the creation of ultracold heteronuclear molecules assembled from fermionic 40K and bosonic 87Rb atoms in a 3D optical lattice. Molecules are produced at a heteronuclear Feshbach resonance both on the attractive and the repulsive side of the resonance. We precisely determine the binding energy of the heteronuclear molecules from rf spectroscopy across the Feshbach resonance. We characterize the lifetime of the molecular sample as a function of magnetic field and measure between 20 and 120ms. The efficiency of molecule creation via rf association is measured and is found to decrease as expected for more deeply bound molecules.
  • We demonstrate tuning of interactions between fermionic 40K and bosonic 87Rb atoms by Feshbach resonances and access the complete phase diagram of the harmonically trapped mixture from phase separation to collapse. On the attractive side of the resonance, we observe a strongly enhanced mean-field energy of the condensate due to the mutual mean-field confinement, predicted by a Thomas-Fermi model. As we increase heteronuclear interactions beyond a threshold, we observe an induced collapse of the mixture. On the repulsive side of the resonance, we observe vertical phase separation of the mixture in the presence of the gravitational force, thus entering a completely unexplored part of the phase diagram of the mixture. In addition, we identify the 515 G resonance as p-wave by its characteristic doublet structure.
  • We present the experimental observation of a magnetically tuned resonance phenomenon resulting from spin mixing dynamics of ultracold atomic gases. In particular we study the magnetic field dependence of spin conversion in F=2 87Rb spinor condensates in the crossover from interaction dominated to quadratic Zeeman dominated dynamics. We discuss the observed phenomenon in the framework of spin dynamics as well as matter wave four wave mixing. Furthermore we show that the validity range of the single mode approximation for spin dynamics is significantly extended in the regime of high magnetic field.
  • We observe a localized phase of ultracold bosonic quantum gases in a 3-dimensional optical lattice induced by a small contribution of fermionic atoms acting as impurities in a Fermi-Bose quantum gas mixture. In particular we study the dependence of this transition on the fermionic 40K impurity concentration by a comparison to the corresponding superfluid to Mott insulator transition in a pure bosonic 87Rb gas and find a significant shift in the transition parameter. The observed shift is larger than expected based on a mean-field argument, which is a strong indication that disorder-related effects play a significant role.
  • We have studied effects of interspecies attraction in a Fermi-Bose mixture over a large regime of particle numbers in the 40K / 87Rb system. We report on the observation of a mean field driven collapse at critical particle numbers of 1.2 million 87Rb atoms in the condensate and 750,000 40K atoms consistent with mean field theory for an interspecies scattering length of -281(15) Bohr radii [S. Inouye et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 183201 (2004)]. For overcritical particle numbers, we see evidence for revivals of the collapse. Before and after the collapse, the axial expansion profileof the 40K cloud is strongly modified and reflects the in-trap density profile distorted by the mean field interspecies attraction. Part of our detailed study of the decay dynamics and mechanisms is a measurement of the (87Rb - 87Rb- 40K) three-body loss coefficient K3=(2.8+-1.1)*10^-28 cm^6/s, which is an important input parameter for dynamical studies of the system.
  • We present measurements and a theoretical model for the interplay of spin dependent interactions and external magnetic fields in atomic spinor condensates. We highlight general features like quadratic Zeeman dephasing and its influence on coherent spin mixing processes by focusing on a specific coherent superposition state in a F=1 $^{87}$Rb Bose-Einstein condensate. In particular, we observe the transition from coherent spinor oscillations to thermal equilibration.
  • We discuss magnetism in spinor quantum gases theoretically and experimentally with emphasis on temporal dynamics of the spinor order parameter in the presence of an external magnetic field. In a simple coupled Gross-Pitaevskii picture we observe a dramatic suppression of spin dynamics due to quadratic Zeeman ''dephasing''. In view of an inhomogeneous density profile of the trapped condensate we present evidence of spatial variations of spin dynamics. In addition we study spinor quantum gases as a model system for thermodynamics of Bose-Einstein condensation. As a particular example we present measurements on condensate magnetisation due to the interaction with a thermal bath.
  • We theoretically consider the formation of bright solitons in a mixture of Bose and Fermi degenerate gases. While we assume the forces between atoms in a pure Bose component to be effectively repulsive, their character can be changed from repulsive to attractive in the presence of fermions provided the Bose and Fermi gases attract each other strongly enough. In such a regime the Bose component becomes a gas of effectively attractive atoms. Hence, generating bright solitons in the bosonic gas is possible. Indeed, after a sudden increase of the strength of attraction between bosons and fermions (realized by using a Feshbach resonance technique or by firm radial squeezing of both samples) soliton trains appear in the Bose-Fermi mixture.
  • We report on the observation of a mixed spin channel Feshbach resonance at the low magnetic field value of (9.09 +/- 0.01) G for a mixture of |2,-1> and |1,+1> states in 87Rb. This mixture is important for applications of multi-component BECs of 87Rb, e.g. in spin mixture physics and for quantum entanglement. Values for position, height and width of the resonance are reported and compared to a recent theoretical calculation of this resonance.
  • This review discusses progress in the new field of coherent matter waves, in particular with respect to Bose-Einstein condensates. We give a short introduction to Bose-Einstein condensation and the theoretical description of the condensate wavefunction. We concentrate on the coherence properties of this new type of matter wave as a basis for fundamental physics and applications. The main part of this review treats various measurements and concepts in the physics with coherent matter waves. In particular we present phase manipulation methods, atom lasers, nonlinear atom optics, optical elements, interferometry and physics in optical lattices. We give an overview of the state of the art in the respective fields and discuss achievements and challenges for the future.
  • We present a novel experimental approach to Bose-Einstein condensation by increasing the particle number of the system at almost constant temperature. In particular the emergence of a new condensate is observed in multi-component F=1 spinor condensates of 87-Rb. Furthermore we develop a simple rate-equation model for multi-component BEC thermodynamics at finite temperature which well reproduces the measured effects.