• Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) are widely used to measure the expansion of the Universe. To perform such measurements the luminosity and cosmological redshift ($z$) of the SNe Ia have to be determined. The uncertainty on $z$ includes an unknown peculiar velocity, which can be very large for SNe Ia in the virialized cores of massive clusters. We determine which SNe Ia exploded in galaxy clusters. We then study how the correction for peculiar velocities of host galaxies inside the clusters improves the Hubble residuals. Using 145 SNe Ia from the Nearby Supernova Factory we found 11 candidates for membership in clusters. To estimate the redshift of a cluster we applied the bi-weight technique. Then, we use the galaxy cluster redshift instead of the host galaxy redshift to construct the Hubble diagram. For SNe Ia inside galaxy clusters the dispersion around the Hubble diagram when peculiar velocities are taken into account is smaller in comparison with a case without peculiar velocity correction, with a $wRMS=0.130\pm0.038$ mag instead of $wRMS=0.137\pm0.036$ mag. The significance of this improvement is 3.58 $\sigma$. If we remove the very nearby Virgo cluster member SN2006X ($z<0.01$) from the analysis, the significance decreases to 1.34 $\sigma$. The peculiar velocity correction is found to be highest for the SNe Ia hosted by blue spiral galaxies, with high local specific star formation rate and smaller stellar mass, seemingly counter to what might be expected given the heavy concentration of old, massive elliptical galaxies in clusters. As expected, the Hubble residuals of SNe Ia associated with massive galaxy clusters improve when the cluster redshift is taken as the cosmological redshift of the SN. This fact has to be taken into account in future cosmological analyses in order to achieve higher accuracy for cosmological redshift measurements. Here we provide an approach to do so.
  • We have discovered an anomalous behavior of CCD readout electronics that affects their use in many astronomical applications. An offset in the digitization of the CCD output voltage that depends on the binary encoding of one pixel is added to pixels that are read out one, two and/or three pixels later. One result of this effect is the introduction of a differential offset in the background when comparing regions with and without flux from science targets. Conventional data reduction methods do not correct for this offset. We find this effect in 16 of 22 instruments investigated, covering a variety of telescopes and many different front-end electronics systems. The affected instruments include LRIS and DEIMOS on the Keck telescopes, WFC3-UVIS and STIS on HST, MegaCam on CFHT, SNIFS on the UH88 telescope, GMOS on the Gemini telescopes, HSC on Subaru, and FORS on VLT. The amplitude of the introduced offset is up to 4.5 ADU per pixel, and it is not directly proportional to the measured ADU level. We have developed a model that can be used to detect this "binary offset effect" in data and correct for it. Understanding how data are affected and applying a correction for the effect is essential for precise astronomical measurements.
  • Context. Observations of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) can be used to derive accurate cosmological distances through empirical standardization techniques. Despite this success neither the progenitors of SNe Ia nor the explosion process are fully understood. The U-band region has been less well observed for nearby SNe, due to technical challenges, but is the most readily accessible band for high-redshift SNe. Aims. Using spectrophotometry from the Nearby Supernova Factory, we study the origin and extent of U-band spectroscopic variations in SNe Ia and explore consequences for their standardization and the potential for providing new insights into the explosion process. Methods. We divide the U-band spectrum into four wavelength regions {\lambda}(uNi), {\lambda}(uTi), {\lambda}(uSi) and {\lambda}(uCa). Two of these span the Ca H&K {\lambda}{\lambda} 3934, 3969 complex. We employ spectral synthesis using SYNAPPS to associate the two bluer regions with Ni/Co and Ti. Results. (1) The flux of the uTi feature is an extremely sensitive temperature/luminosity indicator, standardizing the SN peak luminosity to 0.116 $\pm$ 0.011 mag RMS. A traditional SALT2.4 fit on the same sample yields a 0.135 mag RMS. Standardization using uTi also reduces the difference in corrected magnitude between SNe originating from different host galaxy environments. (2) Early U-band spectra can be used to probe the Ni+Co distribution in the ejecta, thus offering a rare window into the source of lightcurve power. (3) The uCa flux further improves standardization, yielding a 0.086 $\pm$ 0.010 mag RMS without the need to include an additional intrinsic dispersion to reach {\chi}$^2$/dof $\sim$ 1. This reduction in RMS is partially driven by an improved standardization of Shallow Silicon and 91T-like SNe.
  • The scientific yield of current and future optical surveys is increasingly limited by systematic uncertainties in the flux calibration. This is the case for Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) cosmology programs, where an improved calibration directly translates into improved cosmological constraints. Current methodology rests on models of stars. Here we aim to obtain flux calibration that is traceable to state-of-the-art detector-based calibration. We present the SNIFS Calibration Apparatus (SCALA), a color (relative) flux calibration system developed for the SuperNova Integral Field Spectrograph (SNIFS), operating at the University of Hawaii 2.2 m (UH 88) telescope. By comparing the color trend of the illumination generated by SCALA during two commissioning runs, and to previous laboratory measurements, we show that we can determine the light emitted by SCALA with a long-term repeatability better than 1%. We describe the calibration procedure necessary to control for system aging. We present measurements of the SNIFS throughput as estimated by SCALA observations. The SCALA calibration unit is now fully deployed at the UH\,88 telescope, and with it color-calibration between 4000 {\AA} and 9000 {\AA} is stable at the percent level over a one-year baseline.
  • We present ALMA CO (2-1) detections in 11 gas-rich cluster galaxies at z~1.6, constituting the largest sample of molecular gas measurements in z>1.5 clusters to date. The observations span three galaxy clusters, derived from the Spitzer Adaptation of the Red-sequence Cluster Survey. We augment the >5sigma detections of the CO (2-1) fluxes with multi-band photometry, yielding stellar masses and infrared-derived star formation rates, to place some of the first constraints on molecular gas properties in z~1.6 cluster environments. We measure sizable gas reservoirs of 0.5-2x10^11 solar masses in these objects, with high gas fractions and long depletion timescales, averaging 62% and 1.4 Gyr, respectively. We compare our cluster galaxies to the scaling relations of the coeval field, in the context of how gas fractions and depletion timescales vary with respect to the star-forming main sequence. We find that our cluster galaxies lie systematically off the field scaling relations at z=1.6 toward enhanced gas fractions, at a level of ~4sigma, but have consistent depletion timescales. Exploiting CO detections in lower-redshift clusters from the literature, we investigate the evolution of the gas fraction in cluster galaxies, finding it to mimic the strong rise with redshift in the field. We emphasize the utility of detecting abundant gas-rich galaxies in high-redshift clusters, deeming them as crucial laboratories for future statistical studies.
  • We compile a sample of spectroscopically- and photometrically-selected cluster galaxies from four high-redshift galaxy clusters ($1.59 < z < 1.71$) from the Spitzer Adaptation of the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (SpARCS), and a comparison field sample selected from the UKIDSS Deep Survey. Using near-infrared imaging from the \textit{Hubble Space Telescope} we classify potential mergers involving massive ($M_* \geq 3\times 10^{10}\mathrm{M}_\odot$) cluster members by eye, based on morphological properties such as tidal distortions, double nuclei, and projected near neighbors within 20 kpc. With a catalogue of 23 spectroscopic and 32 photometric massive cluster members across the four clusters and 65 spectroscopic and 26 photometric comparable field galaxies, we find that after taking into account contamination from interlopers, $11.0 ^{+7.0}_{-5.6}\%$ of the cluster members are involved in potential mergers, compared to $24.7^{+5.3}_{-4.6}\%$ of the field galaxies. We see no evidence of merger enhancement in the central cluster environment with respect to the field, suggesting that galaxy-galaxy merging is not a stronger source of galaxy evolution in cluster environments compared to the field at these redshifts.
  • Correction of Type Ia Supernova brightnesses for extinction by dust has proven to be a vexing problem. Here we study the dust foreground to the highly reddened SN 2012cu, which is projected onto a dust lane in the galaxy NGC 4772. The analysis is based on multi-epoch, spectrophotometric observations spanning 3,300 - 9,200 {\AA}, obtained by the Nearby Supernova Factory. Phase-matched comparison of the spectroscopically twinned SN 2012cu and SN 2011fe across 10 epochs results in the best-fit color excess of (E(B-V), RMS) = (1.00, 0.03) and total-to-selective extinction ratio of (RV , RMS) = (2.95, 0.08) toward SN 2012cu within its host galaxy. We further identify several diffuse interstellar bands, and compare the 5780 {\AA} band with the dust-to-band ratio for the Milky Way. Overall, we find the foreground dust-extinction properties for SN 2012cu to be consistent with those of the Milky Way. Furthermore we find no evidence for significant time variation in any of these extinction tracers. We also compare the dust extinction curve models of Cardelli et al. (1989), O'Donnell (1994), and Fitzpatrick (1999), and find the predictions of Fitzpatrick (1999) fit SN 2012cu the best. Finally, the distance to NGC4772, the host of SN 2012cu, at a redshift of z = 0.0035, often assigned to the Virgo Southern Extension, is determined to be 16.6$\pm$1.1 Mpc. We compare this result with distance measurements in the literature.
  • We introduce a method for identifying "twin" Type Ia supernovae, and using them to improve distance measurements. This novel approach to Type Ia supernova standardization is made possible by spectrophotometric time series observations from the Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory). We begin with a well-measured set of supernovae, find pairs whose spectra match well across the entire optical window, and then test whether this leads to a smaller dispersion in their absolute brightnesses. This analysis is completed in a blinded fashion, ensuring that decisions made in implementing the method do not inadvertently bias the result. We find that pairs of supernovae with more closely matched spectra indeed have reduced brightness dispersion. We are able to standardize this initial set of SNfactory supernovae to 0.083 +/- 0.012 magnitudes, implying a dispersion of 0.072 +/- 0.010 magnitudes in the absence of peculiar velocities. We estimate that with larger numbers of comparison SNe, e.g, using the final SNfactory spectrophotometric dataset as a reference, this method will be capable of standardizing high-redshift supernovae to within 0.06-0.07 magnitudes. These results imply that at least 3/4 of the variance in Hubble residuals in current supernova cosmology analyses is due to previously unaccounted-for astrophysical differences among the supernovae
  • Previously we used the Nearby Supernova Factory sample to show that SNe~Ia having locally star-forming environments are dimmer than SNe~Ia having locally passive environments.Here we use the \constitution\ sample together with host galaxy data from \GALEX\ to independently confirm that result. The effect is seen using both the SALT2 and MLCS2k2 lightcurve fitting and standardization methods, with brightness differences of $0.094 \pm 0.037\ \mathrm{mag}$ for SALT2 and $0.155 \pm 0.041\ \mathrm{mag}$ for MLCS2k2 with $R_V=2.5$. When combined with our previous measurement the effect is $0.094 \pm 0.025\ \mathrm{mag}$ for SALT2. If the ratio of these local SN~Ia environments changes with redshift or sample selection, this can lead to a bias in cosmological measurements. We explore this issue further, using as an example the direct measurement of $H_0$. \GALEX{} observations show that the SNe~Ia having standardized absolute magnitudes calibrated via the Cepheid period--luminosity relation using {\textit{HST}} originate in predominately star-forming environments, whereas only ~50% of the Hubble-flow comparison sample have locally star-forming environments. As a consequence, the $H_0$ measurement using SNe~Ia is currently overestimated. Correcting for this bias, we find a value of $H_0^{corr}=70.6\pm 2.6\ \mathrm{km\ s^{-1}\ Mpc^{-1}}$ when using the LMC distance, Milky Way parallaxes and the NGC~4258 megamaser as the Cepheid zeropoint, and $68.8\pm 3.3\ \mathrm{km\ s^{-1}\ Mpc^{-1}}$ when only using NGC~4258. Our correction brings the direct measurement of $H_0$ within $\sim 1\,\sigma$ of recent indirect measurements based on the CMB power spectrum.
  • We study entanglement creation over global distances based on a quantum repeater architecture that uses low-earth orbit satellites equipped with entangled photon sources, as well as ground stations equipped with quantum non-demolition detectors and quantum memories. We show that this approach allows entanglement creation at viable rates over distances that are inaccessible via direct transmission through optical fibers or even from very distant satellites.