• {Abridged version for ArXiv}. We provide direct constraints on the origin of the [Ne II] emission in 15 young stars using high-spatial and spectral resolution observations with VISIR at the VLT that allow us to study the kinematics of the emitting gas. In addition we compare the [Ne II] line with optical forbidden lines observed for three stars with UVES. The [Ne II] line was detected in 7 stars, among them the first confirmed detection of [Ne II] in a Herbig Be star, V892 Tau. In four cases, the large blueshifted lines indicate an origin in a jet. In two stars, the small shifts and asymmetric profiles indicate an origin in a photo-evaporative wind. CoKu Tau 1, seen close to edge-on, shows a spatially unresolved line centered at the stellar rest velocity, although cross-dispersion centroids move within 10 AU from one side of the star to the other as a function of wavelength. The line profile is symmetric with wings extending up to about +-80 km/s. The origin of the [Ne II] line could either be due to the bipolar jet or to the disk. For the stars with VLT-UVES observations, in several cases, the optical forbidden line profiles and shifts are very similar to the profile of the [Ne II] line, suggesting that the lines are emitted in the same region. A general trend observed with VISIR is a lower line flux when compared with the fluxes obtained with Spitzer. We found no correlation between the line full-width at half maximum and the line peak velocity. The [Ne II] line remains undetected in a large part of the sample, an indication that the emission detected with Spitzer in those stars is likely extended.
  • We report on accretion- and outflow-related X-rays from T Tauri stars, based on results from the "XMM-Newton Extended Survey of the Taurus Molecular Cloud." X-rays potentially form in shocks of accretion streams near the stellar surface, although we hypothesize that direct interactions between the streams and magnetic coronae may occur as well. We report on the discovery of a "soft excess" in accreting T Tauri stars supporting these scenarios. We further discuss a new type of X-ray source in jet-driving T Tauri stars. It shows a strongly absorbed coronal component and a very soft, weakly absorbed component probably related to shocks in microjets. The excessive coronal absorption points to dust-depletion in the accretion streams.
  • (abridged) We investigate the long-term evolution of X-ray coronae of solar analogs based on high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy and photometry with XMM-Newton. Six nearby main-sequence G stars with ages between ~0.1 Gyr and \~1.6 Gyr and rotation periods between ~1d and 12.4d have been observed. We derive coronal element abundances and the coronal emission measure distribution (EMD). The abundances change from an inverse-First Ionization Potential (FIP) distribution in stars with ages around 0.1 Gyr to a solar-type FIP distribution in stars at ages of 0.3 Gyr and beyond. The coronal EMDs show shapes characterized by power-laws on each side of the EMD peak. The latter shifts from temperatures of about 10 MK in the most rapidly rotating, young stars to temperatures around 4 MK in the oldest target considered here. The power-law index on the cooler side of the EMD exceeds expected slopes for static loops, with typical values being 1.5-3. We interpret this slope with a model in which the coronal emission is due to a superposition of stochastically occurring flares, with an occurrence rate that is distributed in radiated energy E as a power-law, dN/dE ~ E^-a. Our EMDs indicate a ~ 2.2-2.8, in excellent agreement with values previously derived from light curves of magnetically active stars. We derive the range of flare energies required to explain the light-curve modulation. In an overall scenario, we propose that flaring activity plays a larger role in more active stars. In this model, the higher flare rate is responsible both for the higher average coronal temperature and the high coronal X-ray luminosity, two parameters that are indeed found to be correlated.
  • We present the first results of an XMM-Newton EPIC survey of NGC 2516, a southern low-metallicity open cluster with an age close to the Pleiades. The attained limiting sensitivity is of ~ 2.4 10^-15 erg sec^-1} cm^-2 in the 0.1--4.0 keV bandpass. This has been achieved by summing the data of the MOS and PN cameras of two distinct observations for a total exposure time of ~ 33 ks and by analyzing the summed data set with the wavelet detection algorithm developed at Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo (OAPA) that has yielded over 200 X-ray detections. Using data just from a single exposure or from a single camera would have reduced by a factor 2--4 our limiting sensitivity and would have resulted in 25--40% less X-ray detections. To date, 129 detections have as counterparts one or more of the 540 photometrically selected cluster members in the surveyed region, for a total of 147 likely detected members, with unique identification in 112 cases. We derive the X-ray luminosity functions (XLF) of NGC 2516 members of different spectral types and compare them with those of the more metal rich, approximately coeval Pleiades cluster, finding the NGC 2516 photometrically selected dG and dK stars less luminous than the Pleiades. The XLFs of the NGC 2516 and of the Pleiades dM stars are indistinguishable. We compare the XMM-Newton results with those recently obtained with Chandra.