• Proton-nucleus (p+A) collisions have long been recognized as a crucial component of the physics programme with nuclear beams at high energies, in particular for their reference role to interpret and understand nucleus-nucleus data as well as for their potential to elucidate the partonic structure of matter at low parton fractional momenta (small-x). Here, we summarize the main motivations that make a proton-nucleus run a decisive ingredient for a successful heavy-ion programme at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and we present unique scientific opportunities arising from these collisions. We also review the status of ongoing discussions about operation plans for the p+A mode at the LHC.
  • Unitarity corrections to several electromagnetic processes in collisions of relativistic heavy nuclei are considered. They are due to the unitarity requirement for the S-matrix and correspond to the exchange of light-by-light scattering block between colliding nuclei. We obtain improved results for the corrections to e+e- and mu+mu- pair production, as well as new results for unitarity corrections to the production of photons via virtual Compton and virtual Delbruck scattering. These corrections can be numerically large; e.g., the mu+mu- pair production cross section is reduced by about 50% and the nuclear bremsstrahlung by about 15 to 20%.
  • We discuss the physics of large impact parameter interactions at the LHC: ultraperipheral collisions (UPCs). The dominant processes in UPCs are photon-nucleon (nucleus) interactions. The current LHC detector configurations can explore small $x$ hard phenomena with nuclei and nucleons at photon-nucleon center-of-mass energies above 1 TeV, extending the $x$ range of HERA by a factor of ten. In particular, it will be possible to probe diffractive and inclusive parton densities in nuclei using several processes. The interaction of small dipoles with protons and nuclei can be investigated in elastic and quasi-elastic $J/\psi$ and $\Upsilon$ production as well as in high $t$ $\rho^0$ production accompanied by a rapidity gap. Several of these phenomena provide clean signatures of the onset of the new high gluon density QCD regime. The LHC is in the kinematic range where nonlinear effects are several times larger than at HERA. Two-photon processes in UPCs are also studied. In addition, while UPCs play a role in limiting the maximum beam luminosity, they can also be used a luminosity monitor by measuring mutual electromagnetic dissociation of the beam nuclei. We also review similar studies at HERA and RHIC as well as describe the potential use of the LHC detectors for UPC measurements.
  • Virtual radiative corrections due to the long range Coulomb forces of heavy nuclei with charge Z may lead to sizeable corrections to the Born cross section usually used for lepton-nucleus scattering processes. An introduction and presentation of the most important issues of the eikonal approximation is given. We present calculations for forward electroproduction production of rho mesons in a framework suggested by the VDM (vector dominance model), using the eikonal approximation. It turns out that Coulomb corrections may become relatively large. Some minor errors in the literature are corrected.
  • Ultra-peripheral collisions of relativistic heavy ions involve long-ranged electromagnetic interactions at impact parameters too large for hadronic interactions to occur. The nuclear charges are large; with the coherent enhancement, the cross sections are also large. Many types of photonuclear and purely electromagnetic interactions are possible. We present here an introduction to ultra-peripheral collisions, and present four of the most compelling physics topics. This note developed from a discussion at a workshop on ``Electromagnetic Probes of Fundamental Physics,'' in Erice, Italy, Oct. 16-21, 2001.
  • The results concerning the $e^+e^-$ production in peripheral highly relativistic heavy-ion collisions presented in a recent paper by Baltz {\em{et al.}} are rederived in a very straightforward manner. It is shown that the solution of the Dirac equation directly leads to the multiplicity, i.e. to the total number of electron-positron pairs produced by the electromagnetic field of the ions, whereas the calculation of the single pair production probability is much more involved. A critical observation concerns the unsolved problem of seemingly absent Coulomb corrections (Bethe-Maximon corrections) in pair production cross sections. It is shown that neither the inclusion of the vacuum-vacuum amplitude nor the correct interpretation of the solution of the Dirac equation concerning the pair multiplicity is able the explain (from a fundamental point of view) the absence of Coulomb corrections. Therefore the contradiction has to be accounted to the treatment of the high energy limit.
  • The experimental determination of the lifetime of pionium provides a very important test on chiral perturbation theory. This quantity is determined in the DIRAC experiment at CERN. In the analysis of this experiment, the breakup probabilities of of pionium in matter are needed to high accuracy as a theoretical input. We study in detail the influence of the target electrons. They contribute through screening and incoherent effects. We use Dirac-Hartree- Fock-Slater wavefunctions in order to determine the corresponding form factors. We find that the inner-shell electrons contribute less than the weakly bound outer electrons. Furthermore, we establish a more rigorous estimate for the magnitude of the contributions form the transverse current (magnetic terms thus far neglected in the calculations).
  • Due to the coherence of all the protons in a nucleus, there are very strong electromagnetic fields of short duration in relativistic heavy ion collisions. They give rise to quasireal photon-photon and photon-nucleus collisions with a large flux. RHIC will begin its experimental program this year and such types of collisions will be studied experimentally at the STAR detector. RHIC will have the highest flux of (quasireal) photons up to now in the GeV region. At the LHC the invariant mass range available in gamma-gamma-interactions will be of the order of 100 GeV, i.e., in the range currently available at LEP2, but with a higher gamma-gamma-luminosity. Therefore one has there also the potential to study new physics. (Quasireal) photon-hadron (i.e., photon-nucleus) interactions can be studied as well, similar to HERA, at higher invariant masses. Vector mesons can be produced coherently through photon-Pomeron and photon-meson interactions in exclusive reactions such as A+A -> A+A+V, where A is the heavy ion and V=rho,omega,phi or J/Psi.
  • We study the eikonal model for the nuclear-induced breakup of Borromean nuclei, using Li11 and He6 as examples. The full eikonal model is difficult to realize because of six-dimensional integrals, but a number of simplifying approximations are found to be accurate. The integrated diffractive and one-nucleon stripping cross sections are rather insensitive to the neutron-neutron correlation, but the two-nucleon stripping does show some dependence on the correlation. The distribution of excitation energy in the neutron-core final state in one-neutron stripping reactions is quite sensitive to the shell structure of the halo wave function. Experimental data favor models with comparable amounts of s- and p-wave in the Li11 halo.