• This draft report summarizes and details the findings, results, and recommendations derived from the ASCR/HEP Exascale Requirements Review meeting held in June, 2015. The main conclusions are as follows. 1) Larger, more capable computing and data facilities are needed to support HEP science goals in all three frontiers: Energy, Intensity, and Cosmic. The expected scale of the demand at the 2025 timescale is at least two orders of magnitude -- and in some cases greater -- than that available currently. 2) The growth rate of data produced by simulations is overwhelming the current ability, of both facilities and researchers, to store and analyze it. Additional resources and new techniques for data analysis are urgently needed. 3) Data rates and volumes from HEP experimental facilities are also straining the ability to store and analyze large and complex data volumes. Appropriately configured leadership-class facilities can play a transformational role in enabling scientific discovery from these datasets. 4) A close integration of HPC simulation and data analysis will aid greatly in interpreting results from HEP experiments. Such an integration will minimize data movement and facilitate interdependent workflows. 5) Long-range planning between HEP and ASCR will be required to meet HEP's research needs. To best use ASCR HPC resources the experimental HEP program needs a) an established long-term plan for access to ASCR computational and data resources, b) an ability to map workflows onto HPC resources, c) the ability for ASCR facilities to accommodate workflows run by collaborations that can have thousands of individual members, d) to transition codes to the next-generation HPC platforms that will be available at ASCR facilities, e) to build up and train a workforce capable of developing and using simulations and analysis to support HEP scientific research on next-generation systems.
  • The complexity of the Round Damped Detuned Structue (RDDS) for the JLC/NLC main linac is driven by the considerations of rf efficiency and dipole wakefield suppression. As a time and cost saving measure for the JLC/NLC, the dimensions of the 3D RDDS cell are being determined through computer modeling to within fabrication precision so that no tuning may be needed once the structures are assembled. The tolerances on the frequency errors for the RDDS structure are about one MHz for the fundamental mode and a few MHz for the dipole modes. At the X-band frequency, these correspond to errors of a micron level on the major cell dimensions. Such a level of resolution requires highly accurate field solvers and vast amount of computer resources. A parallel finite-element eigensolver Omega3P was developed at SLAC that runs on massively parallel computers such as the Cray T3E at NERSC. The code was applied in the design of the RDDS cell dimensions that are accurate to within fabrication precision. We will present the numerical approach of using these codes to determine the RDDS dimensions and compare the numerical predictions with the cold test measurements on RDDS prototypes that are diamond-turned using these dimensions.
  • As a joint effort in the JLC/NLC research program, we have developed a new type of damped detuned accelerator structure with optimized round-shaped cavities (RDDS). This paper discusses some important R&D aspects of the first structure in this series (RDDS1). The design aspects covered are the cell design with sub-MHz precision, HOM detuning, coupling and damping technique and wakefield simulation. The fabrication issues covered are ultra-precision cell machining with micron accuracy, assembly and diffusion bonding technologies to satisfactorily meet bookshelf, straightness and cell rotational alignment requirements. The measurements described are the RF properties of single cavities and complete accelerator section, as well as wakefields from the ASSET tests at SLAC. Finally, future improvements are also discussed.
  • We show that scattering matrix calculations for dipole modes between 23-43 GHz for the 206 cell detuned structure (DS) are consistent with finite element calculations and results of the uncoupled model. In particular, the rms sum wake for these bands is comparable to that of the first dipole band. We also show that for RDDS1 uncoupled wakefield calculations for higher bands are consistent with measurements. In particular, a clear 26 GHz signal in the short range wake is found in both results.