• Using the Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys data in the COSMOS field, we systematically searched clumpy galaxies at 0.2<z<1.0 and investigated the fraction of clumpy galaxies and its evolution as a function of stellar mass, star formation rate (SFR), and specific SFR (SSFR). The fraction of clumpy galaxies in star-forming galaxies with Mstar > 10^9.5 Msun decreases with time from ~0.35 at 0.8<z<1.0 to ~0.05 at 0.2<z<0.4 irrespective of the stellar mass, although the fraction tends to be slightly lower for massive galaxies with Mstar > 10^10.5 Msun at each redshift. On the other hand, the fraction of clumpy galaxies increases with increasing both SFR and SSFR in all the redshift ranges we investigated. In particular, we found that the SSFR dependences of the fractions are similar among galaxies with different stellar masses, and the fraction at a given SSFR does not depend on the stellar mass in each redshift bin. The evolution of the fraction of clumpy galaxies from z~0.9 to z~0.3 seems to be explained by such SSFR dependence of the fraction and the evolution of SSFRs of star-forming galaxies. The fraction at a given SSFR also appears to decrease with time, but this can be due to the effect of the morphological K-correction. We suggest that these results are understood by the gravitational fragmentation model for the formation of giant clumps in disk galaxies, where the gas mass fraction is a crucial parameter.
  • In order to understand nature of building blocks of galaxies in the early universe, we investigate "genuine irregular galaxies (GIGs)" in the nearby universe. Here, GIGs are defined as isolated galaxies without regular structures (spheroid, bulge, disk, bar, spiral arm, and nucleus). Using the results of two excellent studies on galaxy morphology based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we obtain a sample of 66 irregular galaxies. We carry out new classification of them into GIGs and non-GIGs which have regular structure or show evidence for galaxy interaction, by using the SDSS Data Release 10 images. We then find that a half of these irregular galaxies (33/66) are GIGs and obtain an unambiguous sample of 33 GIGs for the first time. We discuss their observational properties by comparing them with those of elliptical, S0, spiral galaxies, and irregular galaxies without the GIGs. We find that our GIGs have smaller sizes, lower optical luminosities, bluer rest-frame optical colors, lower surface stellar mass densities, and lower gas metallicity than normal galaxies. All these properties suggest that they are in chemically and dynamically younger phases even in the nearby universe.
  • AKARI/Infrared Camera (IRC) Point Source Catalog provides a large amount of flux data at {\it S9W} ($9\ {\rm \mu m}$) and {\it L18W} ($18\ {\rm \mu m}$) bands. With the goal of constructing Star-Formation Rate(SFR) calculations using IRC data, we analyzed an IR selected GALEX-SDSS-2MASS-AKARI(IRC/Far-Infrared Surveyor) sample of 153 nearby galaxies. The far-infrared fluxes were obtained from AKARI diffuse maps to correct the underestimation for extended sources raised by the point-spread function photometry. SFRs of these galaxies were derived by the spectral energy distribution fitting program CIGALE. In spite of complicated features contained in these bands, both the {\it S9W} and {\it L18W} emission correlate with the SFR of galaxies. The SFR calibrations using {\it S9W} and {\it L18W} are presented for the first time. These calibrations agree well with previous works based on Spitzer data within the scatters, and should be applicable to dust-rich galaxies.
  • We report the discovery of two field brown dwarfs, ULAS J0128-0041 and ULAS J0321+0051, and the rediscovery of ULAS J0226+0051 (IfA 0230-Z1), in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) southern equatorial stripe. They are found in the course of our follow-up observation program of 1 um excess sources in the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope Infrared Deep Sky Survey. The Gemini Multi-Object Spectrographs spectra at red optical wavelengths (6500-10500 A) are presented, which reveal that they are early-T dwarfs. The classification is also supported by their optical to near-infrared colors. It is noted that ULAS J0321+0051 is one of the faintest currently known T dwarfs. The estimated distances to the three objects are 50-110 pc, thus they are among the most distant field T dwarfs known. Dense temporal coverage of the target fields achieved by the SDSS-II Supernova Survey allows us to perform a simple time-series analysis, which leads to the finding of significant proper motions of 150-290 mas/yr or the transverse velocities of 40-100 km/s for ULAS J0128-0041 and ULAS J0226+0051. We also find that there are no detectable, long-term (a-few-year) brightness variations above a few times 0.1 mag for the two brown dwarfs.