• We present Arecibo, GBT, VLA and WIYN/pODI observations of the ALFALFA source AGC 226067. Originally identified as an ultra-compact high velocity cloud and candidate Local Group galaxy, AGC 226067 is spatially and kinematically coincident with the Virgo cluster, and the identification by multiple groups of an optical counterpart with no resolved stars supports the interpretation that this systems lies at the Virgo distance (D=17 Mpc). The combined observations reveal that the system consists of multiple components: a central HI source associated with the optical counterpart (AGC 226067), a smaller HI-only component (AGC 229490), a second optical component (AGC 229491), and extended low surface brightness HI. Only ~1/4 of the single-dish HI emission is associated with AGC 226067; as a result, we find M_HI/L_g ~ 6 Msun/Lsun, which is lower than previous work. At D=17 Mpc, AGC 226067 has an HI mass of 1.5 x 10^7 Msun and L_g = 2.4 x 10^6 Lsun, AGC 229490 (the HI-only component) has M_HI = 3.6 x 10^6 Msun, and AGC 229491 (the second optical component) has L_g = 3.6 x 10^5 Lsun. The nature of this system of three sources is uncertain: AGC 226067 and AGC 229490 may be connected by an HI bridge, and AGC 229490 and AGC 229491 are separated by only 0.5'. The current data do not resolve the HI in AGC 229490 and its origin is unclear. We discuss possible scenarios for this system of objects: an interacting system of dwarf galaxies, accretion of material onto AGC 226067, or stripping of material from AGC 226067.
  • We present neutral hydrogen (HI) imaging observations with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope of AGC198606, an HI cloud discovered in the ALFALFA 21cm survey. This object is of particular note as it is located 16 km/s and 1.2 degrees from the gas-bearing ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Leo T while having a similar HI linewidth and approximately twice the flux density. The HI imaging observations reveal a smooth, undisturbed HI morphology with a full extent of 23'x16' at the 5x10^18 atoms cm^-2 level. The velocity field of AGC198606 shows ordered motion with a gradient of ~25 km/s across ~20'. The global velocity dispersion is 9.3 km/s with no evidence for a narrow spectral component. No optical counterpart to AGC198606 is detected. The distance to AGC198606 is unknown, and we consider several different scenarios: physical association with Leo T, a minihalo at a distance of ~150 kpc based on the models of Faerman et al. (2013), and a cloud in the Galactic halo. At a distance of 420 kpc, AGC198606 would have an HI mass of 6.2x10^5 Msun, an HI radius of 1.4 kpc, and a dynamical mass within the HI extent of 1.5x10^8 Msun.
  • We present near infra-red light curves of supernova (SN) 2011fe in M101, including 34 epochs in H band starting fourteen days before maximum brightness in the B-band. The light curve data were obtained with the WIYN High-Resolution Infrared Camera (WHIRC). When the data are calibrated using templates of other Type Ia SNe, we derive an apparent H-band magnitude at the epoch of B-band maximum of 10.85 \pm 0.04. This implies a distance modulus for M101 that ranges from 28.86 to 29.17 mag, depending on which absolute calibration for Type Ia SNe is used.
  • A variability study of the young cluster IC 348 at Van Vleck Observatory has been extended to a total of seven years. Twelve new periodic stars have been found in the last two years, bringing the total discovered by this program to 40. In addition, we confirm 16 of the periods reported by others and resolve some discrepancies. The total number of known rotation periods in the cluster, from all studies has now reached 70. This is sufficient to demonstrate that the parent population of K5-M2 stars is rotationally indistinguishable from that in the Orion Nebula Cluster even though their radii are 20% smaller and they would be expected to spin about twice as fast if angular momentum were conserved. The median radius and, therefore, inferred age of the IC 348 stars actually closely matches that of NGC 2264, but the stars spin significantly more slowly. This suggests that another factor besides mass and age plays a role in establishing the rotation properties within a cluster and we suggest that it is environment. If disk locking were to persist for longer times in less harsh environments, because the disks themselves persist for longer times, it could explain the generally slower rotation rates observed for stars in this cluster, whose earliest type star is of class B5. We have also obtained radial velocities, the first for PMS stars in IC348, and v sin i measurements for 30 cluster stars to assist in the study of rotation and as an independent check on stellar radii. Several unusual variable stars are discussed; in some or all cases their behavior may be linked to occultations by circumstellar material. A strong correlation exists between the range of photometric variability and the slope of the spectral energy distribution in the infrared. Nineteen of the 21 stars with I ranges exceeding 0.4 mag show infrared evidence for circumstellar disks.
  • We present wide-field spectroscopy of globular clusters around the Leo I group galaxies NGC 3379 and NGC 3384 using the FLAMES multi-fibre instrument at the VLT. We obtain accurate radial velocities for 42 globular clusters (GCs) in total, 30 for GCs around the elliptical NGC 3379, eight around the lenticular NGC 3384, and four which may be associated with either galaxy. These data are notable for their large radial range extending from 0'7 to 14'5 (2 to 42 kpc) from the centre of NGC 3379, and small velocity uncertainties of about 10 km/s. We combine our sample of 30 radial velocities for globular clusters around NGC 3379 with 8 additional GC velocities from the literature, and find a projected velocity dispersion of 175(+24/-22) km/s at R < 5' and 147(+44/-39) at R > 5'. These velocity dispersions are consistent with a dark matter halo around NGC 3379 with a concentration in the range expected from a LCDM cosmological model and a total mass of ~ 6 x 10^11 Msun. Such a model is also consistent with the stellar velocity dispersion at small radii and the rotation of the HI ring at large radii, and has a M/L_B that increases by a factor of five from several kpc to 100 kpc. Our velocity dispersion for the globular cluster system of NGC 3379 is somewhat higher than that found for the planetary nebulae (PNe) in the inner region covered by the PN data, and we discuss possible reasons for this difference. For NGC 3384, we find the GC system has a rotation signature broadly similar to that seen in other kinematic probes of this SB0 galaxy. This suggests that significant rotation may not be unusual in the GC systems of disc galaxies.
  • We have investigated the global properties of the globular cluster (GC) systems of three early-type galaxies: the Virgo elliptical NGC4406, the field elliptical NGC3379, and the field S0 galaxy NGC4594. These galaxies were observed as part of a wide-field CCD survey of the GC populations of a sample of normal galaxies beyond the Local Group. Images obtained with the Mosaic detector on the Kitt Peak 4-m provide radial coverage to at least 24', or 70-100 kpc. We use BVR photometry and image classification to select GC candidates and thereby reduce contamination from non-GCs, and HST data to help quantify the contamination that remains. The GC systems of all three galaxies have color distributions with at least two peaks and show modest negative color gradients. The proportions of blue GCs range from 60-70% of the total populations. The GC specific frequency (S_N) of NGC4406 is 3.5+/-0.5, 20% lower than past estimates and nearly identical to S_N for the other Virgo cluster elliptical included in our survey, NGC4472. S_N for NGC3379 and NGC4594 are 1.2+/-0.3 and 2.1+/-0.3, respectively; these are similar to past values but the errors have been reduced by a factor of 2-3. We compare our results to models for the formation of massive galaxies and their GC systems. Of the scenarios we consider, a hierarchical merging picture -- in which metal-poor GCs form at high redshift in protogalactic building blocks and metal-rich GC populations are built up during subsequent gas-rich mergers -- appears most consistent with the data. [abridged]
  • We have obtained high-dispersion spectra for 256 pre-main-sequence stars in the Orion Nebula Cluster in order to measure their projected rotational velocities and study the rotational evolution and physical properties of young, low-mass stars. Half the stars were chosen because they had known photometric periods and half were selected as a control sample of similar objects without known periods. More than 90% of the spectra yielded vsin(i) measurements, although one-third are upper limits. We find strong evidence confirming the assumption that the periodic light variations of T Tauri stars are caused by rotation of surface spots. We find no significant difference between the vsin(i) distributions of the periodic and control samples, indicating that there is no strong bias in studying the rotation of young stars using periodic variables. Likewise, the classical and weak T Tauri stars exhibit vsin(i) distributions that are statistically the same. For stars with known period and vsin(i), the mean value of sin(i) is lower than expected for a random distribution of rotation axes. This could be due to errors in the quantities that contribute to the sin(i) calculation or to a real physical effect. We find that mean sin(i) has the expected value if we increase the stars' Teff values by 400-600 K. Finally, we have calculated minimum radii for stars with vsin(i) and period, and average radii for stars grouped by location in the H-R diagram. We find evidence at the 3-sigma level that the radii of stars on similar mass tracks are decreasing as the stars move closer to the ZAMS. [abridged]
  • Eighteen fields in the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) have been monitored for one or more observing seasons from 1990-99 with a 0.6-m telescope at Wesleyan University. Photometric data were obtained in Cousins I on 25-40 nights per season. Results from the first 3 years of monitoring were analyzed by Choi & Herbst (1996; CH). Here we provide an update based on 6 more years of observation and the extensive optical and IR study of the ONC by Hillenbrand (1997) and Hillenbrand et al. (1998). Rotation periods are now available for 134 ONC members. Of these, 67 were detected at multiple epochs with identical periods by us and 15 more were confirmed by Stassun et al. (1999) in their study of Ori OBIc/d. The bimodal period distribution for the ONC is confirmed, but we also find a clear dependence of rotation period on mass. This can be understood as an effect of deuterium burning, which temporarily slows the contraction and thus spin-up of stars with M <0.25 solar masses and ages of ~1 My. Stars with M <0.25 solar masses have not had time to bridge the gap in the period distribution at ~4 days. Excess H-K and I-K emission, as well as CaII infrared triplet equivalent widths (Hillenbrand et al. 1998), show weak but significant correlations with rotation period among stars with M >0.25 solar masses. Our results provide new observational support for the importance of disks in the early rotational evolution of low mass stars. [abridged]
  • The nearby irregular galaxy Holmberg II has been extensively mapped in HI using the Very Large Array (VLA), revealing intricate structure in its interstellar gas component (Puche et al. 1992). An analysis of these structures shows the neutral gas to contain a number of expanding HI holes. The formation of the HI holes has been attributed to multiple supernova events occurring within wind-blown shells around young, massive star clusters, with as many as 10-200 supernovae required to produce many of the holes. From the sizes and expansion velocities of the holes, Puche et al. assigned ages of ~10^7 to 10^8 years. If the supernova scenario for the formation of the HI holes is correct, it implies the existence of star clusters with a substantial population of late-B, A and F main sequence stars at the centers of the holes. Many of these clusters should be detectable in deep ground-based CCD images of the galaxy. In order to test the supernova hypothesis for the formation of the HI holes, we have obtained and analyzed deep broad-band BVR and narrow-band H-alpha images of Ho II. We compare the optical and HI data and search for evidence of the expected star clusters in and around the HI holes. We also use the HI data to constrain models of the expected remnant stellar population. We show that in several of the holes the observed upper limits for the remnant cluster brightness are strongly inconsistent with the SNe hypothesis described in Puche et al. Moreover, many of the HI holes are located in regions of very low optical surface brightness which show no indication of recent star formation. Here we present our findings and explore possible alternative explanations for the existence of the HI holes in Ho II, including the suggestion that some of the holes were produced by Gamma-ray burst events.