• We present results from the first twelve months of operation of Radio Galaxy Zoo, which upon completion will enable visual inspection of over 170,000 radio sources to determine the host galaxy of the radio emission and the radio morphology. Radio Galaxy Zoo uses $1.4\,$GHz radio images from both the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty Centimeters (FIRST) and the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) in combination with mid-infrared images at $3.4\,\mu$m from the {\it Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer} (WISE) and at $3.6\,\mu$m from the {\it Spitzer Space Telescope}. We present the early analysis of the WISE mid-infrared colours of the host galaxies. For images in which there is $>\,75\%$ consensus among the Radio Galaxy Zoo cross-identifications, the project participants are as effective as the science experts at identifying the host galaxies. The majority of the identified host galaxies reside in the mid-infrared colour space dominated by elliptical galaxies, quasi-stellar objects (QSOs), and luminous infrared radio galaxies (LIRGs). We also find a distinct population of Radio Galaxy Zoo host galaxies residing in a redder mid-infrared colour space consisting of star-forming galaxies and/or dust-enhanced non star-forming galaxies consistent with a scenario of merger-driven active galactic nuclei (AGN) formation. The completion of the full Radio Galaxy Zoo project will measure the relative populations of these hosts as a function of radio morphology and power while providing an avenue for the identification of rare and extreme radio structures. Currently, we are investigating candidates for radio galaxies with extreme morphologies, such as giant radio galaxies, late-type host galaxies with extended radio emission, and hybrid morphology radio sources.
  • Context: In astronomy, new approaches to process and analyze the exponentially increasing amount of data are inevitable. While classical approaches (e.g. template fitting) are fine for objects of well-known classes, alternative techniques have to be developed to determine those that do not fit. Therefore a classification scheme should be based on individual properties instead of fitting to a global model and therefore loose valuable information. An important issue when dealing with large data sets is the outlier detection which at the moment is often treated problem-orientated. Aims: In this paper we present a method to statistically estimate the redshift z based on a similarity approach. This allows us to determine redshifts in spectra in emission as well as in absorption without using any predefined model. Additionally we show how an estimate of the redshift based on single features is possible. As a consequence we are e.g. able to filter objects which show multiple redshift components. We propose to apply this general method to all similar problems in order to identify objects where traditional approaches fail. Methods: The redshift estimation is performed by comparing predefined regions in the spectra and applying a k nearest neighbor regression model for every predefined emission and absorption region, individually. Results: We estimated a redshift for more than 50% of the analyzed 16,000 spectra of our reference and test sample. The redshift estimate yields a precision for every individually tested feature that is comparable with the overall precision of the redshifts of SDSS. In 14 spectra we find a significant shift between emission and absorption or emission and emission lines. The results show already the immense power of this simple machine learning approach for investigating huge databases such as the SDSS.
  • Using a sample of high-redshift lensed quasars from the CASTLES project with observed-frame ultraviolet or optical and near-infrared spectra, we have searched for possible biases between supermassive black hole (BH) mass estimates based on the CIV, Halpha and Hbeta broad emission lines. Our sample is based upon that of Greene, Peng & Ludwig, expanded with new near-IR spectroscopic observations, consistently analyzed high S/N optical spectra, and consistent continuum luminosity estimates at 5100A. We find that BH mass estimates based on the FWHM of CIV show a systematic offset with respect to those obtained from the line dispersion, sigma_l, of the same emission line, but not with those obtained from the FWHM of Halpha and Hbeta. The magnitude of the offset depends on the treatment of the HeII and FeII emission blended with CIV, but there is little scatter for any fixed measurement prescription. While we otherwise find no systematic offsets between CIV and Balmer line mass estimates, we do find that the residuals between them are strongly correlated with the ratio of the UV and optical continuum luminosities. Removing this dependency reduces the scatter between the UV- and optical-based BH mass estimates by a factor of approximately 2, from roughly 0.35 to 0.18 dex. The dispersion is smallest when comparing the CIV sigma_l mass estimate, after removing the offset from the FWHM estimates, and either Balmer line mass estimate. The correlation with the continuum slope is likely due to a combination of reddening, host contamination and object-dependent SED shapes. When we add additional heterogeneous measurements from the literature, the results are unchanged.