• This paper describes the beginning of the Far-Infrared Surveyor mission study for NASA's Astrophysics Decadal 2020. We describe the scope of the study, and the open process approach of the Science and Technology Definition Team. We are currently developing the science cases and provide some preliminary highlights here. We note key areas for technological innovation and improvements necessary to make a Far-Infrared Surveyor mission a reality.
  • We present spectra of 13 T Tauri stars in the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region showing emission in Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) 5-7.5 micron spectra from water vapor and absorption from other gases in these stars' protoplanetary disks. Seven stars' spectra show an emission feature at 6.6 microns due to the nu_2 = 1-0 bending mode of water vapor, with the shape of the spectrum suggesting water vapor temperatures > 500 K, though some of these spectra also show indications of an absorption band, likely from another molecule. This water vapor emission contrasts with the absorption from warm water vapor seen in the spectrum of the FU Orionis star V1057 Cyg. The other six of the thirteen stars have spectra showing a strong absorption band, peaking in strength at 5.6-5.7 microns, which for some is consistent with gaseous formaldehyde (H2CO) and for others is consistent with gaseous formic acid (HCOOH). There are indications that some of these six stars may also have weak water vapor emission. Modeling of these stars' spectra suggests these gases are present in the inner few AU of their host disks, consistent with recent studies of infrared spectra showing gas in protoplanetary disks.
  • We present 70 and 160 micron Herschel science demonstration images of a field in the Orion A molecular cloud that contains the prototypical Herbig-Haro objects HH 1 and 2, obtained with the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS). These observations demonstrate Herschel's unprecedented ability to study the rich population of protostars in the Orion molecular clouds at the wavelengths where they emit most of their luminosity. The four protostars previously identified by Spitzer 3.6-40 micron imaging and spectroscopy are detected in the 70 micron band, and three are clearly detected at 160 microns. We measure photometry of the protostars in the PACS bands and assemble their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from 1 to 870 microns with these data, Spitzer spectra and photometry, 2MASS data, and APEX sub-mm data. The SEDs are fit to models generated with radiative transfer codes. From these fits we can constrain the fundamental properties of the protostars. We find luminosities in the range 12-84 L_sun and envelope densities spanning over two orders of magnitude. This implies that the four protostars have a wide range of envelope infall rates and evolutionary states: two have dense, infalling envelopes, while the other two have only residual envelopes. We also show the highly irregular and filamentary structure of the cold dust and gas surrounding the protostars as traced at 160 microns.
  • The NGC 1999 reflection nebula features a dark patch with a size of ~10,000 AU, which has been interpreted as a small, dense foreground globule and possible site of imminent star formation. We present Herschel PACS far-infrared 70 and 160mum maps, which reveal a flux deficit at the location of the globule. We estimate the globule mass needed to produce such an absorption feature to be a few tenths to a few Msun. Inspired by this Herschel observation, we obtained APEX LABOCA and SABOCA submillimeter continuum maps, and Magellan PANIC near-infrared images of the region. We do not detect a submillimer source at the location of the Herschel flux decrement; furthermore our observations place an upper limit on the mass of the globule of ~2.4x10^-2 Msun. Indeed, the submillimeter maps appear to show a flux depression as well. Furthermore, the near-infrared images detect faint background stars that are less affected by extinction inside the dark patch than in its surroundings. We suggest that the dark patch is in fact a hole or cavity in the material producing the NGC 1999 reflection nebula, excavated by protostellar jets from the V 380 Ori multiple system.
  • Dust grains in the planet forming regions around young stars are expected to be heavily processed due to coagulation, fragmentation and crystallization. This paper focuses on the crystalline silicate dust grains in protoplanetary disks. As part of the Cores to Disks Legacy Program, we obtained more than a hundred Spitzer/IRS spectra of TTauri stars. More than 3/4 of our objects show at least one crystalline silicate emission feature that can be essentially attributed to Mg-rich silicates. Observational properties of the crystalline features seen at lambda > 20 mu correlate with each other, while they are largely uncorrelated with the properties of the amorphous silicate 10 mu feature. This supports the idea that the IRS spectra essentially probe two independent disk regions: a warm zone (< 1 AU) emitting at lambda ~ 10 mu and a much colder region emitting at lambda > 20 mu (< 10 AU). We identify a crystallinity paradox, as the long-wavelength crystalline silicate features are 3.5 times more frequently detected (~55 % vs. ~15%) than the crystalline features arising from much warmer disk regions. This suggests that the disk has an inhomogeneous dust composition within ~10 AU. The abundant crystalline silicates found far from their presumed formation regions suggests efficient outward radial transport mechanisms in the disks. The analysis of the shape and strength of both the amorphous 10 mu feature and the crystalline feature around 23 mu provides evidence for the prevalence of micron-sized grains in upper layers of disks. Their presence in disk atmospheres suggests efficient vertical diffusion, likely accompanied by grain-grain fragmentation to balance the efficient growth expected. Finally, the depletion of submicron-sized grains points toward removal mechanisms such as stellar winds or radiation pressure.
  • Circumstellar discs are expected to be the nursery of planets. Grain growth within such discs is the first step in the planet formation process. The Bok globule CB 26 harbours such a young disc. We present a detailed model of the edge-on circumstellar disc and its envelope in the Bok globule CB 26. The model is based on HST near-infrared maps in the I, J, H, and K bands, OVRO and SMA radio maps at 1.1mm, 1.3mm and 2.7mm, and the spectral energy distribution (SED) from 0.9 microns to 3mm. New photometric and spectroscopic data from the Spitzer Space Telescope and the Caltech Submilimeter Observatory have been obtained and are part of our analysis. Using the self-consistent radiative transfer code MC3D, the model we construct is able to discriminate parameter sets and dust properties of both its parts, namely envelope and disc. We find that the disc has an inner hole with a radius of 45 +/- 5 AU. Based on a dust model including silicate and graphite the maximum grain size needed to reproduce the spectral millimetre index is 2.5 microns. Features seen in the near-infrared images, dominated by scattered light, can be described as a result of a rotating envelope. Successful employment of ISM dust in both the disc and envelope hint that grain growth may not yet play a significant role for the appearance of this system. A larger inner hole gives rise to the assumption that CB 26 is a circumbinary disc.
  • We present a panchromatic study, involving a multiple technique approach, of the circumstellar disc surrounding the T Tauri star IM Lupi (Sz 82). We have undertaken a comprehensive observational study of IM Lupi using photometry, spectroscopy, millimetre interferometry and multi-wavelength imaging. For the first time, the disc is resolved from optical and near-infrared wavelengths in scattered light, to the millimetre regime in thermal emission. Our data-set, in conjunction with existing photometric data, provides an extensive coverage of the spectral energy distribution, including a detailed spectrum of the silicate emission bands. We have performed a simultaneous modelling of the various observations, using the radiative transfer code MCFOST, and analysed a grid of models over a large fraction of the parameter space via Bayesian inference. We have constructed a model that can reproduce all of the observations of the disc. Our analysis illustrates the importance of combining a wide range of observations in order to fully constrain the disc model, with each observation providing a strong constraint only on some aspects of the disc structure and dust content. Quantitative evidence of dust evolution in the disc is obtained: grain growth up to millimetre-sized particles, vertical stratification of dust grains with micrometric grains close to the disc surface and larger grains which have settled towards the disc midplane, and possibly the formation of fluffy aggregates and/or ice mantles around grains.
  • With the goal to study the physical and chemical evolution of ices in solar-mass systems, a spectral survey is conducted of a sample of 41 low luminosity YSOs using 3-38 um Spitzer and ground-based spectra. The long-known 6.0 and 6.85 um bands are detected toward all sources, with the Class 0-type YSOs showing the deepest bands ever observed. In almost all sources the 6.0 um band is deeper than expected from the bending mode of pure solid H2O. The depth and shape variations of the remaining 5-7 um absorption indicate that it consists of 5 independent components, which, by comparison to laboratory studies, must be from at least 8 different carriers. Simple species are responsible for much of the absorption in the 5-7 um region, at abundances of 1-30% for CH3OH, 3-8% for NH3, 1-5% for HCOOH, ~6% for H2CO, and ~0.3% for HCOO- with respect to solid H2O. The 6.85 um band likely consists of one or two carriers, of which one is less volatile than H2O because its abundance relative to H2O is enhanced at lower H2O/tau_9.7 ratios. It does not survive in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM), however. The similarity of the 6.85 um bands for YSOs and background stars indicates that its carrier(s) must be formed early in the molecular cloud evolution. If an NH4+ salt is the carrier its abundance with respect to solid H2O is typically 7%, and low temperature acid-base chemistry or cosmic ray induced reactions must have been involved in its formation. Possible origins are discussed for the carrier of an enigmatic, very broad absorption between 5 and 8 um. Finally, all the phenomena observed for ices toward massive YSOs are also observed toward low mass YSOs, indicating that processing of the ices by internal ultraviolet radiation fields is a minor factor in the early chemical evolution of the ices. [abridged]
  • Sensitive 5-38 um Spitzer Space Telescope (SST) and ground based 3-5 um spectra of the embedded low mass protostars B5 IRS1 and HH46 IRS show deep ice absorption bands superposed on steeply rising mid-infrared continua. The ices likely originate in the circumstellar envelopes. The CO2 bending mode at 15 um is a particularly powerful tracer of the ice composition and processing history. Toward these protostars, this band shows little evidence for thermal processing at temperatures above 50 K. Signatures of lower temperature processing are present in the CO and OCN- bands, however. The observed CO2 profile indicates an intimate mixture with H2O, but not necessarily with CH3OH, in contrast to some high mass protostars. This is consistent with the low CH3OH abundance derived from the ground based L band spectra. The CO2/H2O column density ratios are high in both B5 IRS1 and HH46 IRS (~35%). Clearly, the SST spectra are essential to study ice evolution in low mass protostellar environments, and to eventually determine the relation between interstellar and solar system ices.
  • We present 3-5 micron VLT-ISAAC spectroscopy searching for evidence of methanol ices in edge-on disks of young embedded stars. Examples include the disks of L1489 IRS in Taurus and CRBR 2422.8-3423 in Ophiuchus, the last of which has the highest column density of solid CO known toward a YSO. We find no unambiguous evidence for abundant methanol in the observed disks, but give strict upper limits. Several additional low-mass sources in the Serpens and Chameleon molecular clouds exhibit abundant solid methanol, although it is not clear if the ice is associated with a disk or with the envelope. These are the first detections of solid methanol in the circumstellar environments of embedded young low-mass stars providing evidence that complex molecular species previously observed only in the solid state toward high-mass star forming regions are also present near solar-type young stars. The constraints on the formation mechanisms of methanol and the chemical evolution of ices as the material is incorporated into circumstellar disks are discussed.
  • We present high resolution VLT spectra of 2 submm-detected galaxies. Diagnostic stellar absorption lines (Starburst99) are used to analyse their stellar population. SMM J14011+0252 (z=2.565) shows signs of starburst and SMM J02399-0136 (z=2.808) shows signs of starburst and AGN. A MgII line at z~0.94 is identified in the latter galaxy and could account for an extra magnification factor in this SCUBA source.