• As the closest open cluster to the Sun, the Hyades is an important benchmark for many stellar properties, but its members are also scattered widely over the sky. Previous studies of stellar rotation in the Hyades relied on targeted observations of single stars or data from shallower all-sky variability surveys. The re-purposed Kepler mission, K2, is the first opportunity to measure rotation periods ($P_{rot}$) for many Hyads simultaneously while also being sensitive to fully convective M dwarf members. We analyze K2 data for 65 Hyads and present $P_{rot}$ values for 48. Thirty-seven of these are new measurements, including the first $P_{rot}$ measurements for fully convective Hyads. For nine of the 11 stars with $P_{rot}$ in the literature and this work, the measurements are consistent; we attribute the two discrepant cases to spot evolution. Nearly all stars with masses $\le0.3M_\odot$ are rapidly rotating, indicating a change in rotation properties at the boundary to full convection. When confirmed and candidate binaries are removed from the mass-period plane, only three rapid rotators with masses $\ge0.3M_\odot$ remain. This is in contrast to previous results showing that the single-valued mass-period sequence for $\approx$600 Myr-old stars ends at $\approx0.65M_\odot$ when binaries are included. We also find that models of rotational evolution predict faster rotation than is actually observed at $\approx$600 Myrs for stars $\le0.9M_\odot$. The dearth of single rapid rotators more massive than $\approx0.3M_\odot$ indicates that magnetic braking is more efficient than previously thought, and that age-rotation studies must account for multiplicity.
  • The dust extinction curve is a critical component of many observational programs and an important diagnostic of the physics of the interstellar medium. Here we present new measurements of the dust extinction curve and its variation towards tens of thousands of stars, a hundred-fold larger sample than in existing detailed studies. We use data from the APOGEE spectroscopic survey in combination with ten-band photometry from Pan-STARRS1, 2MASS, and WISE. We find that the extinction curve in the optical through infrared is well characterized by a one-parameter family of curves described by R(V). The extinction curve is more uniform than suggested in past works, with sigma(R(V)) = 0.18, and with less than one percent of sight lines having R(V) > 4. Our data and analysis have revealed two new aspects of Galactic extinction: first, we find significant, wide-area variations in R(V) throughout the Galactic plane. These variations are on scales much larger than individual molecular clouds, indicating that R(V) variations must trace much more than just grain growth in dense molecular environments. Indeed, we find no correlation between R(V) and dust column density up to E(B-V) ~ 2. Second, we discover a strong relationship between R(V) and the far-infrared dust emissivity.
  • We present a time-variability study of young stellar objects in the cluster IRAS 20050+2720, performed at 3.6 and 4.5 micron with the Spitzer Space Telescope; this study is part of the Young Stellar Object VARiability project (YSOVAR). We have collected light curves for 181 cluster members over 40 days. We find a high variability fraction among embedded cluster members of ca. 70%, whereas young stars without a detectable disk display variability less often (in ca. 50% of the cases) and with lower amplitudes. We detect periodic variability for 33 sources with periods primarily in the range of 2-6 days. Practically all embedded periodic sources display additional variability on top of their periodicity. Furthermore, we analyze the slopes of the tracks that our sources span in the color-magnitude diagram (CMD). We find that sources with long variability time scales tend to display CMD slopes that are at least partially influenced by accretion processes, while sources with short variability time scales tend to display extinction-dominated slopes. We find a tentative trend of X-ray detected cluster members to vary on longer time scales than the X-ray undetected members.
  • Open clusters are collections of stars with a single, well-determined age, and can be used to investigate the connections between angular-momentum evolution and magnetic activity over a star's lifetime. We present the results of a comparative study of the relationship between stellar rotation and activity in two benchmark open clusters: Praesepe and the Hyades. As they have the same age and roughly solar metallicity, these clusters serve as an ideal laboratory for testing the agreement between theoretical and empirical rotation-activity relations at $\approx$600 Myr. We have compiled a sample of 720 spectra --- more than half of which are new observations --- for 516 high-confidence members of Praesepe; we have also obtained 139 new spectra for 130 high-confidence Hyads. We have collected rotation periods ($P_{rot}$) for 135 Praesepe members and 87 Hyads. To compare $H\alpha$ emission, an indicator of chromospheric activity, as a function of color, mass, and Rossby number $R_o$, we first calculate an expanded set of $\chi$ values, with which we can obtain the $H\alpha$ to bolometric luminosity ratio, $L_{H\alpha}/L_{bol}$, even when spectra are not flux-calibrated and/or stars lack reliable distances. Our $\chi$ values cover a broader range of stellar masses and colors (roughly equivalent to spectral types from K0 to M9), and exhibit better agreement between independent calculations, than existing values. We find no difference between the two clusters in their $H\alpha$ equivalent width or $L_{H\alpha}/L_{bol}$ distributions, and therefore take the merged $H\alpha$ and $P_{rot}$ data to be representative of 600-Myr-old stars. Our analysis shows that $H\alpha$ activity in these stars is saturated for $R_o\leq0.11^{+0.02}_{-0.03}$. Above that value activity declines as a power-law with slope $\beta=-0.73^{+0.16}_{-0.12}$, before dropping off rapidly at $R_o\approx0.4$...
  • The emission from young stellar objects (YSOs) in the mid-IR is dominated by the inner rim of their circumstellar disks. We present an IR-monitoring survey of about 800 objects in the direction of the Lynds 1688 (L1688) star forming region over four visibility windows spanning 1.6 years using the \emph{Spitzer} space telescope in its warm mission phase. Among all lightcurves, 57 sources are cluster members identified based on their spectral-energy distribution and X-ray emission. Almost all cluster members show significant variability. The amplitude of the variability is larger in more embedded YSOs. Ten out of 57 cluster members have periodic variations in the lightcurves with periods typically between three and seven days, but even for those sources, significant variability in addition to the periodic signal can be seen. No period is stable over 1.6 years. Non-periodic lightcurves often still show a preferred timescale of variability which is longer for more embedded sources. About half of all sources exhibit redder colors in a fainter state. This is compatible with time-variable absorption towards the YSO. The other half becomes bluer when fainter. These colors can only be explained with significant changes in the structure of the inner disk. No relation between mid-IR variability and stellar effective temperature or X-ray spectrum is found.
  • We previously reported the direct detection of a low mass companion at a projected separation of 55+-2 AU around the B9 type star {\kappa} Andromedae. The properties of the system (mass ratio, separation) make it a benchmark for the understanding of the formation and evolution of gas giant planets and brown dwarfs on wide-orbits. We present new angular differential imaging (ADI) images of the Kappa Andromedae system at 2.146 (Ks), 3.776 (L'), 4.052 (NB 4.05) and 4.78 {\mu}m (M') obtained with Keck/NIRC2 and LBTI/LMIRCam, as well as more accurate near-infrared photometry of the star with the MIMIR instrument. We derive a more accurate J = 15.86 +- 0.21, H = 14.95 +- 0.13, Ks = 14.32 +- 0.09 mag for {\kappa} And b. We redetect the companion in all our high contrast observations. We confirm previous contrasts obtained at Ks and L' band. We derive NB 4.05 = 13.0 +- 0.2 and M' = 13.3 +- 0.3 mag and estimate Log10(L/Lsun) = -3.76 +- 0.06. We build the 1-5 microns spectral energy distribution of the companion and compare it to seven PHOENIX-based atmospheric models in order to derive Teff = 1900+100-200 K. Models do not set constrains on the surface gravity. ``Hot-start" evolutionary models predict masses of 14+25-2 MJup based on the luminosity and temperature estimates, and considering a conservative age range for the system (30+120-10 Myr). ``warm-start" evolutionary tracks constrain the mass to M >= 11 MJup. Therefore, the mass of {\kappa} Andromedae b mostly falls in the brown-dwarf regime, due to remaining uncertainties in age and mass-luminosity models. According to the formation models, disk instability in a primordial disk could account for the position and a wide range of plausible masses of {\kappa} And b.
  • Eclipsing binaries (EBs) provide critical laboratories for empirically testing predictions of theoretical models of stellar structure and evolution. Pre-main-sequence (PMS) EBs are particularly valuable, both due to their rarity and the highly dynamic nature of PMS evolution, such that a dense grid of PMS EBs is required to properly calibrate theoretical PMS models. Analyzing multi-epoch, multi-color light curves for 2400 candidateOrion Nebula Cluster (ONC) members from our Warm Spitzer Exploration Science Program YSOVAR, we have identified 12 stars whose light curves show eclipse features. Four of these 12 EBs are previously known. Supplementing our light curves with follow-up optical and near-infrared spectroscopy, we establish two of the candidates as likely field EBs lying behind the ONC. We confirm the remaining six candidate systems, however, as newly identified ONC PMS EBs. These systems increase the number of known PMS EBs by over 50% and include the highest mass (Theta1 Ori E, for which we provide a complete set of well-determined parameters including component masses of 2.807 and 2.797 solar masses) and longest period (ISOY J053505.71-052354.1, P \sim 20 days) PMS EBs currently known. In two cases (Theta1 Ori E and ISOY J053526.88-044730.7), enough photometric and spectroscopic data exist to attempt an orbit solution and derive the system parameters. For the remaining systems, we combine our data with literature information to provide a preliminary characterization sufficient to guide follow-up investigations of these rare, benchmark systems.
  • We present 348 X-ray emitting stars identified from correlating the Extended Chandra Multiwavelength Project (ChaMP), a serendipitous wide-area X-ray survey, with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We use morphological star/galaxy separation, an SDSS quasar catalog, an optical color-magnitude cut, and X-ray data quality tests to create our catalog, the ChaMP Extended Stellar Survey (ChESS), from a sample of 2121 matched ChaMP/SDSS sources. Our cuts retain 92% of the spectroscopically confirmed stars while excluding 99.6% of the 684 spectoscopically confirmed extragalactic sources. Fewer than 3% of the sources in our final catalog are previously identified stellar X-ray emitters; we expect ~10% of the catalog is composed by giants, and identify seven giant stars and three cataclysmic variables. We derive distances, X-ray and bolometric luminosities for these stars, revealing that this catalog fills the gap between the nearby stars identified by the ROSAT All-Sky Survey and the more distant stars detected in deep Chandra and XMM-Newton surveys. For 36 newly identified X-ray emitting M stars we calculate L_(Halpha)/L_(bol). L_(H\alpha)/L_(bol) and L_(X)/L_(bol) are linearly related below L_(X)/L_(bol) ~ 3 x 10^(-4), while L_(Halpha)/L_(bol) appears to turn over at larger L_(X)/L_(bol) values. Stars with reliable SDSS photometry have an ~0.1 mag blue excess in (u-g), likely due to increased chromospheric continuum emission. Photometric metallicity estimates suggest the sample is split between the young and old disk populations of the Galaxy; the lowest activity sources belong to the old disk population, a clear signature of the decay of magnetic activity with age. Future papers will present analyses of source variability and comparisons of this catalog to models of stellar activity in the Galactic disk.
  • We present high resolution (R = 18,000), high signal-to-noise, 2 micron spectra of 52 infrared-selected Class I and flat-spectrum young stellar objects in the Taurus-Auriga, $\rho$ Ophiuchi, Serpens, Perseus, and Corona Australis dark clouds. We detect key absorption lines in 41 objects and fit synthetic spectra generated from pre-main sequence models to deduce the effective temperatures, surface gravities, near-infrared veilings, rotation velocities, and radial velocities of each of these 41 sources. We find these objects to span ranges in effective temperature, surface gravity, and stellar luminosity which appear similar to those of late spectral-type Class II sources and classical T-Tauri stars. We determine that the mean 2 micron veiling of Class I and flat-spectrum objects is significantly higher than that of Class II objects in the same region where both types of objects are extensively observed ($\rho$ Oph). We find a significant fraction of our protostellar sample also exhibits emission lines. Twenty-three objects show H$_2$ emission, usually indicative of the presence of energetic outflows. Thirty-four sources show HI Br $\gamma$ emission and a number of these exhibit profile asymmetries consistent with in-fall. Eight sources show significant $\Delta v = 2$ CO emission suggestive of emission from a circumstellar disk. Overall, these observations indicate that Class I and flat-spectrum objects are self-embedded protostars undergoing significant mass accretion, although the objects appear to span a broad range of mass accretion activity.
  • We present low-resolution optical spectroscopy and BVRI photometry of 453 candidate nearby stars drawn from the NLTT proper motion catalogue. The stars were selected based on optical/near-infrared colours, derived by combining the NLTT photographic data with photometry from the 2MASS Second Incremental Data Release. Based on the derived photometric and spectroscopic parallaxes, we identify 111 stars as lying within 20 parsecs of the Sun, including 9 stars with formal distance estimates of less than 10 parsecs. A further 53 stars have distance estimates within 1-sigma of our 20-parsec limit. Almost all of those stars are additions to the nearby star census. In total, our NLTT-based survey has so far identified 496 stars likely to be within 20 parsecs, of which 195 are additions to nearby-star catalogues. Most of the newly-identified nearby stars have spectral types between M4 and M8.
  • We have detected a strong periodicity of 1.80+/-0.05 hours in photometric observations of the brown dwarf Kelu-1. The peak-to-peak amplitude of the variation is ~1.1% (11.9+/-0.8 mmag) in a 41nm wide filter centred on 857nm and including the dust/temperature sensitive TiO & CrH bands. We have identified two plausible causes of variability: surface features rotating into- and out-of-view and so modulating the light curve at the rotation period; or, elliposidal variability caused by an orbiting companion. In the first scenario, we combine the observed vsin(i) of Kelu-1 and standard model radius to determine that the axis of rotation is inclined at 65+/-12 degrees to the line of sight.