• The development of high-contrast capabilities has long been recognized as one of the top priorities for the VLTI. As of today, the VLTI routinely achieves contrasts of a few 10$^{-3}$ in the near-infrared with PIONIER (H band) and GRAVITY (K band). Nulling interferometers in the northern hemisphere and non-redundant aperture masking experiments have, however, demonstrated that contrasts of at least a few 10$^{-4}$ are within reach using specific beam combination and data acquisition techniques. In this paper, we explore the possibility to reach similar or higher contrasts on the VLTI. After reviewing the state-of-the-art in high-contrast infrared interferometry, we discuss key features that made the success of other high-contrast interferometric instruments (e.g., integrated optics, nulling, closure phase, and statistical data reduction) and address possible avenues to improve the contrast of the VLTI by at least one order of magnitude. In particular, we discuss the possibility to use integrated optics, proven in the near-infrared, in the thermal near-infrared (L and M bands, 3-5 $\mu$m), a sweet spot to image and characterize young extra-solar planetary systems. Finally, we address the science cases of a high-contrast VLTI imaging instrument and focus particularly on exoplanet science (young exoplanets, planet formation, and exozodiacal disks), stellar physics (fundamental parameters and multiplicity), and extragalactic astrophysics (active galactic nuclei and fundamental constants). Synergies and scientific preparation for other potential future instruments such as the Planet Formation Imager are also briefly discussed.
  • Warped discs have been found on (sub-)parsec scale in some nearby Seyfert nuclei, identified by their maser emission. Using dust radiative transfer simulations we explore their observational signatures in the infrared in order to find out whether they can partly replace the molecular torus. Strong variations of the brightness distributions are found, depending on the orientation of the warp with respect to the line of sight. Whereas images at short wavelengths typically show a disc-like and a point source component, the warp itself only becomes visible at far-infrared wavelengths. A similar variety is visible in the shapes of the spectral energy distributions. Especially for close to edge-on views, the models show silicate feature strengths ranging from deep absorption to strong emission for variations of the lines of sight towards the warp. To test the applicability of our model, we use the case of the Circinus galaxy, where infrared interferometry has revealed a highly elongated emission component matching a warped maser disc in orientation and size. Our model is for the first time able to present a physical explanation for the observed dust morphology as coming from the AGN heated dust. As opposed to available torus models, a warped disc morphology produces a variety of silicate feature shapes for grazing lines of sight, close to an edge-on view. This could be an attractive alternative to a claimed change of the dust composition for the case of the nearby Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068, which harbours a warped maser disc as well.
  • Context. Recent NuSTAR observations revealed a somewhat unexpected increase in the X-ray flux of the nucleus of NGC 1068. We expect the infrared emission of the dusty torus to react on the intrinsic changes of the accretion disk. Aims. We aim to investigate the origin of the X-ray variation by investigating the response of the mid-infrared environment. Methods. We obtained single-aperture and interferometric mid-infrared measurements and directly compared the measurements observed before and immediately after the X-ray variations. The average correlated and single-aperture fluxes as well as the differential phases were directly compared to detect a possible change in the structure of the nuclear emission on scales of $\sim$ 2 pc. Results. The flux densities and differential phases of the observations before and during the X-ray variation show no significant change over a period of ten years. Possible minor variations in the infrared emission are $\lesssim$ 8 %. Conclusions. Our results suggest that the mid-infrared environment of NGC 1068 has remained unchanged for a decade. The recent transient change in the X-rays did not cause a significant variation in the infrared emission. This independent study supports previous conclusions that stated that the X-ray variation detected by NuSTAR observations is due to X-ray emission piercing through a patchy section of the dusty region.
  • Context. Detailed high resolution studies of AGN with mid-infrared (MIR) interferometry have revealed parsec-sized dust emission elongated in the polar direction in four sources. Aims. Using a larger, coherently analyzed sample of AGN observed with MIR interferometry, we aim to identify elongated mid-infrared emission in a statistical sample of sources. More specifically we wish to determine if there is indeed a preferred direction of the elongation and whether this direction is consistent with a torus-like structure or with a polar emission. Methods. We investigate the significance of the detection of an elongated shape in the MIR emission by fitting elongated Gaussian models to the interferometric data at 12 um. We pay special attention to 1) the uncertainties caused by an inhomogeneous (u,v) coverage, 2) the typical errors in the measurements and 3) the spatial resolution achieved for each object. Results. From our sample of 23 sources we are able to find elongated parsec-scale MIR emission in five sources: three type 2s, one type 1i and one type 1. Elongated emission in four of these sources has been published before; NGC5506 is a new detection. The observed axis ratios are typically around 2 and the position angle of the 12 um emission for all the elongated sources seems to be always closer to the polar axis of the system than to the equatorial axis. Two other objects, NGC4507 and MCG-5-23-16 with a reasonably well mapped (u,v) coverage and good signal-to-noise ratios, appear to have a less elongated 12 um emission. Conclusions. Our finding that sources showing elongated mid-infrared emission are preferentially extended in polar direction sets strong constraints on torus models or implies that both the torus and the NLR/outflow region have to be modeled together. Especially also models used for SED fitting will have to be revised to include emission from polar dust.
  • In some AGN, nuclear dust lanes connected to kpc-scale dust structures provide all the extinction required to obscure the nucleus, challenging the role of the dusty torus proposed by the Unified Model. In this letter we show the pc-scale dust and ionized gas maps of Circinus constructed using sub-arcsec-accuracy registration of infrared VLT AO images with optical \textit{Hubble Space Telescope} images. We find that the collimation of the ionized gas does not require a torus but is caused by the distribution of dust lanes of the host galaxy on $\sim$10 pc scales. This finding questions the presumed torus morphology and its role at parsec scales, as one of its main attributes is to collimate the nuclear radiation, and is in line with interferometric observations which show that most of the pc-scale dust is in the polar direction. We estimate that the nuclear dust lane in Circinus provides $1/3$ of the extinction required to obscure the nucleus. This constitutes a conservative lower limit to the obscuration at the central parsecs, where the dust filaments might get optically thicker if they are the channels that transport material from $\sim$100 pc scales to the centre.
  • (Abridged) With infrared interferometry it is possible to resolve the nuclear dust distributions that are commonly associated with the dusty torus in active galactic nuclei (AGN). The Circinus galaxy hosts the closest Seyfert 2 nucleus and previous interferometric observations have shown that its nuclear dust emission is well resolved. To better constrain the dust morphology in this active nucleus, extensive new observations were carried out with MIDI at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer. The emission is distributed in two distinct components: a disk-like emission component with a size of ~ 0.2 $\times$ 1.1 pc and an extended component with a size of ~ 0.8 $\times$ 1.9 pc. The disk-like component is elongated along PA ~ 46{\deg} and oriented perpendicular to the ionisation cone and outflow. The extended component is elongated along PA ~ 107{\deg}, roughly perpendicular to the disk component and thus in polar direction. It is interpreted as emission from the inner funnel of an extended dust distribution and shows a strong increase in the extinction towards the south-east. We find no evidence of an increase in the temperature of the dust towards the centre. From this we infer that most of the near-infrared emission probably comes from parsec scales as well. We further argue that the disk component alone is not sufficient to provide the necessary obscuration and collimation of the ionising radiation and outflow. The material responsible for this must instead be located on scales of ~ 1 pc, surrounding the disk. The clear separation of the dust emission into a disk-like emitter and a polar elongated source will require an adaptation of our current understanding of the dust emission in AGN. The lack of any evidence of an increase in the dust temperature towards the centre poses a challenge for the picture of a centrally heated dust distribution.
  • Warm gas and dust surround the innermost regions of active galactic nuclei (AGN). They provide the material for accretion onto the super-massive black hole and they are held responsible for the orientation-dependent obscuration of the central engine. The AGN-heated dust distributions turn out to be very compact with sizes on scales of about a parsec in the mid-infrared. Only infrared interferometry currently provides the necessary angular resolution to directly study the physical properties of this dust. Size estimates for the dust distributions derived from interferometric observations can be used to construct a size--luminosity relation for the dust distributions. The large scatter about this relation suggests significant differences between the dust tori in the individual galaxies, even for nuclei of the same class of objects and with similar luminosities. This questions the simple picture of the same dusty doughnut in all AGN. The Circinus galaxy is the closest Seyfert 2 galaxy. Because its mid-infrared emission is well resolved interferometrically, it is a prime target for detailed studies of its nuclear dust distribution. An extensive new interferometric data set was obtained for this galaxy. It shows that the dust emission comes from a very dense, disk-like structure which is surrounded by a geometrically thick, similarly warm dust distribution as well as significant amounts of warm dust within the ionisation cone.
  • Spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the central few tens of parsec region of some of the nearest, most well studied, active galactic nuclei (AGN) are presented. These genuine AGN-core SEDs, mostly from Seyfert galaxies, are characterised by two main features: an IR bump with the maximum in the 2-10 micron range, and an increasing X-ray spectrum in the 1 to ~200 keV region. These dominant features are common to Seyfert type 1 and 2 objects alike. Type 2 AGN exhibit a sharp drop shortward of 2 micron, with the optical to UV region being fully absorbed, while type 1s show instead a gentle 2 micron drop ensued by a secondary, partially-absorbed optical to UV emission bump. Assuming the bulk of optical to UV photons generated in these AGN are reprocessed by dust and re-emitted in the IR in an isotropic manner, the IR bump luminosity represents >70% of the total energy output in these objects while the high energies above 20 keV are the second energetically important contribution. Galaxies selected by their warm IR colours, i.e. presenting a relatively-flat flux distribution in the 12 to 60 micron range have often being classified as AGN. The results from these high spatial resolution SEDs question this criterion as a general rule. It is found that the intrinsic shape of the IR SED of an AGN and inferred bolometric luminosity largely depart from those derived from large aperture data. AGN luminosities can be overestimated by up to two orders of magnitude if relying on IR satellite data. We find these differences to be critical for AGN luminosities below or about 10^{44} erg/s. Above this limit, AGNs tend to dominate the light of their host galaxy regardless of the aperture size used. We tentatively mark this luminosity as a threshold to identify galaxy-light- vs AGN- dominated objects.
  • To test the dust torus model for active galactic nuclei directly, we study the extent and morphology of the nuclear dust distribution in the Circinus galaxy using high resolution interferometric observations in the mid-infrared with the MIDI instrument at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer. We find that the dust distribution in the nucleus of Circinus can be explained by two components, a dense and warm disk-like component of 0.4 pc size and a slightly cooler, geometrically thick torus component with a size of 2.0 pc. The disk component is oriented perpendicular to the ionisation cone and outflow and seems to show the silicate feature at 10 micron in emission. It coincides with a nuclear maser disk in orientation and size. From the energy needed to heat the dust, we infer a luminosity of the accretion disk corresponding to 20% of the Eddington luminosity of the nuclear black hole. We find that the interferometric data are inconsistent with a simple, smooth and axisymmetric dust emission. The irregular behaviour of the visibilities and the shallow decrease of the dust temperature with radius provide strong evidence for a clumpy or filamentary dust structure. We see no evidence for dust reprocessing, as the silicate absorption profile is consistent with that of standard galactic dust. We argue that the collimation of the ionising radiation must originate in the geometrically thick torus component. Our findings confirm the presence of a geometrically thick, torus-like dust distribution in the nucleus of Circinus, as required in unified schemes of Seyfert galaxies. Several aspects of our data require that this torus is irregular, or "clumpy".