• We report the discovery of twin radio relics in the outskirts of the low-mass merging galaxy cluster Abell 168 (redshift=0.045). One of the relics is elongated with a linear extent $\sim$ 800 kpc, a projected width of $\sim$ 80 kpc and is located $\sim$ 900 kpc toward the north of the cluster center, oriented roughly perpendicular to the major axis of the X-ray emission. The second relic is ring-shaped with a size $\sim$ 220 kpc and is located near the inner edge of the elongated relic at a distance of $\sim$ 600 kpc from the cluster center. These radio sources were imaged at 323 and 608 MHz with the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope and at 1520 MHz with the Karl G Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). The elongated relic was detected at all the frequencies with a radio power at 1.4 GHz of 1.38$\pm 0.14 \times 10^{23}$ W Hz$^{-1}$ having a power law in the frequency range 70 - 1500 MHz (S$\propto \nu^{\alpha}, \alpha = -1.1 \pm 0.04$). This radio power is in good agreement with that expected from the known empirical relation between the radio powers of relics and the host cluster masses. This is the lowest mass (M$_{500}$ = 1.24$\times$10$^{14}$ M$_{o}$) cluster in which relics due to merger shocks are detected. The ring-shaped relic has a steeper spectral index ($\alpha$) of -1.74$\pm$0.29 in the frequency range 100 - 600 MHz. We propose this relic to be an old plasma revived due to adiabatic compression by the outgoing shock which produced the elongated relic.
  • The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), located in Western Australia, is one of the low-frequency precursors of the international Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project. In addition to pursuing its own ambitious science program, it is also a testbed for wide range of future SKA activities ranging from hardware, software to data analysis. The key science programs for the MWA and SKA require very high dynamic ranges, which challenges calibration and imaging systems. Correct calibration of the instrument and accurate measurements of source flux densities and polarisations require precise characterisation of the telescope's primary beam. Recent results from the MWA GaLactic Extragalactic All-sky MWA (GLEAM) survey show that the previously implemented Average Embedded Element (AEE) model still leaves residual polarisations errors of up to 10-20 % in Stokes Q. We present a new simulation-based Full Embedded Element (FEE) model which is the most rigorous realisation yet of the MWA's primary beam model. It enables efficient calculation of the MWA beam response in arbitrary directions without necessity of spatial interpolation. In the new model, every dipole in the MWA tile (4 x 4 bow-tie dipoles) is simulated separately, taking into account all mutual coupling, ground screen and soil effects, and therefore accounts for the different properties of the individual dipoles within a tile. We have applied the FEE beam model to GLEAM observations at 200 - 231 MHz and used false Stokes parameter leakage as a metric to compare the models. We have determined that the FEE model reduced the magnitude and declination-dependent behaviour of false polarisation in Stokes Q and V while retaining low levels of false polarisation in Stokes U.
  • The current generation of experiments aiming to detect the neutral hydrogen signal from the Epoch of Reionisation (EoR) is likely to be limited by systematic effects associated with removing foreground sources from target fields. In this paper we develop a model for the compact foreground sources in one of the target fields of the MWA's EoR key science experiment: the `EoR1' field. The model is based on both the MWA's GLEAM survey and GMRT 150 MHz data from the TGSS survey, the latter providing higher angular resolution and better astrometric accuracy for compact sources than is available from the MWA alone. The model contains 5049 sources, some of which have complicated morphology in MWA data, Fornax A being the most complex. The higher resolution data show that 13% of sources that appear point-like to the MWA have complicated morphology such as double and quad structure, with a typical separation of 33~arcsec. We derive an analytic expression for the error introduced into the EoR two-dimensional power spectrum due to peeling close double sources as single point sources and show that for the measured source properties, the error in the power spectrum is confined to high $k_\bot$ modes that do not affect the overall result for the large-scale cosmological signal of interest. The brightest ten mis-modelled sources in the field contribute 90% of the power bias in the data, suggesting that it is most critical to improve the models of the brightest sources. With this hybrid model we reprocess data from the EoR1 field and show a maximum of 8% improved calibration accuracy and a factor of two reduction in residual power in $k$-space from peeling these sources. Implications for future EoR experiments including the SKA are discussed in relation to the improvements obtained.
  • We present results from our Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) HI observations of the Arp 305 system. The system consists of two interacting spiral galaxies NGC 4016 and NGC 4017, a large amount of resultant tidal debris and a prominent tidal dwarf galaxy (TDG) candidate projected within the tidal bridge between the two principal galaxies. Our higher resolution GMRT HI mapping, compared to previous observations, allowed detailed study of smaller scale features. Our HI analysis supports the conclusion in Hancock et al. (2009) that the most recent encounter between the pair occurred $\sim$ 4 $\times$ 10$^8$ yrs ago. The GMRT observations also show HI features near NGC 4017 which may be remnants of an earlier encounter between the two galaxies. The HI properties of the Bridge TDG candidate include: M(HI) $\sim$ 6.6 $\times$ 10$^8$ msolar and V(HI) = 3500$\pm$ 7 km/s, which is in good agreement with the velocities of the parent galaxies. Additionally the TDG's HI linewidth of 30 km/s and a modest velocity gradient together with its SFR of 0.2 msolar/yr add to the evidence favouring the bridge candidate being a genuine TDG. The Bridge TDG's \textit{Spitzer} 3.6 $\mu$m and 4.5 $\mu$m counterparts with a [3.6]--[4.5] colour $\sim$ -0.2 mag suggests stellar debris may have seeded its formation. Future spectroscopic observations could confirm this formation scenario and provide the metallicity which is a key criteria for the validation for TDG candidates.
  • We present low-frequency spectral energy distributions of 60 known radio pulsars observed with the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) telescope. We searched the GaLactic and Extragalactic All-sky MWA (GLEAM) survey images for 200-MHz continuum radio emission at the position of all pulsars in the ATNF pulsar catalogue. For the 60 confirmed detections we have measured flux densities in 20 x 8 MHz bands between 72 and 231 MHz. We compare our results to existing measurements and show that the MWA flux densities are in good agreement.
  • We have studied radio haloes and relics in nine merging galaxy clusters using the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA). The images used for this study were obtained from the GaLactic and Extragalactic All-sky MWA (GLEAM) Survey which was carried out at 5 frequencies, viz. 88, 118, 154, 188 and 215 MHz. We detect diffuse radio emission in 8 of these clusters. We have estimated the spectra of haloes and relics in these clusters over the frequency range 80-1400 MHz; the first such attempt to estimate their spectra at low frequencies. The spectra follow a power law with a mean value of $\alpha = -1.13\pm0.21$ for haloes and $\alpha = -1.2\pm0.19$ for relics where, $S \propto \nu^{\alpha}$. We reclassify two of the cluster sources as radio galaxies. The low frequency spectra are thus an independent means of confirming the nature of cluster sources. Five of the nine clusters host radio haloes. For the remaining four clusters, we place upper limits on the radio powers of possible haloes in them. These upper limits are a factor of 2-20 below those expected from the $L_{\rm X}-P_{\rm 1.4}$ relation. These limits are the lowest ever obtained and the implications of these limits to the hadronic model of halo emission are discussed.
  • We present a sample of 1,483 sources that display spectral peaks between 72 MHz and 1.4 GHz, selected from the GaLactic and Extragalactic All-sky Murchison Widefield Array (GLEAM) survey. The GLEAM survey is the widest fractional bandwidth all-sky survey to date, ideal for identifying peaked-spectrum sources at low radio frequencies. Our peaked-spectrum sources are the low frequency analogues of gigahertz-peaked spectrum (GPS) and compact-steep spectrum (CSS) sources, which have been hypothesized to be the precursors to massive radio galaxies. Our sample more than doubles the number of known peaked-spectrum candidates, and 95% of our sample have a newly characterized spectral peak. We highlight that some GPS sources peaking above 5 GHz have had multiple epochs of nuclear activity, and demonstrate the possibility of identifying high redshift ($z > 2$) galaxies via steep optically thin spectral indices and low observed peak frequencies. The distribution of the optically thick spectral indices of our sample is consistent with past GPS/CSS samples but with a large dispersion, suggesting that the spectral peak is a product of an inhomogeneous environment that is individualistic. We find no dependence of observed peak frequency with redshift, consistent with the peaked-spectrum sample comprising both local CSS sources and high-redshift GPS sources. The 5 GHz luminosity distribution lacks the brightest GPS and CSS sources of previous samples, implying that a convolution of source evolution and redshift influences the type of peaked-spectrum sources identified below 1 GHz. Finally, we discuss sources with optically thick spectral indices that exceed the synchrotron self-absorption limit.
  • We present a search for transient and highly variable sources at low radio frequencies (150-200 MHz) that explores long timescales of 1-3 years. We conducted this search by comparing the TIFR GMRT Sky Survey Alternative Data Release 1 (TGSS ADR1) and the GaLactic and Extragalactic All-sky Murchison Widefield Array (GLEAM) survey catalogues. To account for the different completeness thresholds in the individual surveys, we searched for compact GLEAM sources above a flux density limit of 100 mJy that were not present in the TGSS ADR1; and also for compact TGSS ADR1 sources above a flux density limit of 200 mJy that had no counterpart in GLEAM. From a total sample of 234 333 GLEAM sources and 275 612 TGSS ADR1 sources in the overlap region between the two surveys, there were 99658 GLEAM sources and 38 978 TGSS ADR sources that passed our flux density cutoff and compactness criteria. Analysis of these sources resulted in three candidate transient sources. Further analysis ruled out two candidates as imaging artefacts. We analyse the third candidate and show it is likely to be real, with a flux density of 182 +/- 26 mJy at 147.5 MHz. This gives a transient surface density of rho = (6.2 +/- 6) x 10-5 deg-2 . We present initial follow-up observations and discuss possible causes for this candidate. The small number of spurious sources from this search demonstrates the high reliability of these two new low-frequency radio catalogues.
  • Using the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), the low-frequency Square Kilometre Array (SKA1 LOW) precursor located in Western Australia, we have completed the GaLactic and Extragalactic All-sky MWA (GLEAM) survey, and present the resulting extragalactic catalogue, utilising the first year of observations. The catalogue covers 24,831 square degrees, over declinations south of $+30^\circ$ and Galactic latitudes outside $10^\circ$ of the Galactic plane, excluding some areas such as the Magellanic Clouds. It contains 307,455 radio sources with 20 separate flux density measurements across 72--231MHz, selected from a time- and frequency- integrated image centred at 200MHz, with a resolution of $\approx 2$'. Over the catalogued region, we estimate that the catalogue is 90% complete at 170mJy, and 50% complete at 55mJy, and large areas are complete at even lower flux density levels. Its reliability is 99.97% above the detection threshold of $5\sigma$, which itself is typically 50mJy. These observations constitute the widest fractional bandwidth and largest sky area survey at radio frequencies to date, and calibrate the low frequency flux density scale of the southern sky to better than 10%. This paper presents details of the flagging, imaging, mosaicking, and source extraction/characterisation, as well as estimates of the completeness and reliability. All source measurements and images are available online (http://www.mwatelescope.org/science/gleam-survey). This is the first in a series of publications describing the GLEAM survey results.
  • Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are a class of radio-loud (RL) active galactic nuclei (AGN) at high redshifts (z > 1.7) that are characterised by their relative infrared faintness, resulting in enormous radio-to-infrared flux density ratios of up to several thousand. We aim to test the hypothesis that IFRS are young AGN, particularly GHz peaked-spectrum (GPS) and compact steep-spectrum (CSS) sources that have a low frequency turnover. We use the rich radio data set available for the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey fields, covering the frequency range between 150 MHz and 34 GHz with up to 19 wavebands from different telescopes, and build radio spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for 34 IFRS. We then study the radio properties of this class of object with respect to turnover, spectral index, and behaviour towards higher frequencies. We also present the highest-frequency radio observations of an IFRS, observed with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer at 105 GHz, and model the multi-wavelength and radio-far-infrared SED of this source. We find IFRS usually follow single power laws down to observed frequencies of around 150 MHz. Mostly, the radio SEDs are steep, but we also find ultra-steep SEDs. In particular, IFRS show statistically significantly steeper radio SEDs than the broader RL AGN population. Our analysis reveals that the fractions of GPS and CSS sources in the population of IFRS are consistent with the fractions in the broader RL AGN population. We find that at least 18% of IFRS contain young AGN, although the fraction might be significantly higher as suggested by the steep SEDs and the compact morphology of IFRS. The detailed multi-wavelength SED modelling of one IFRS shows that it is different from ordinary AGN, although it is consistent with a composite starburst-AGN model with a star formation rate of 170 solar masses per year.
  • We estimate spatial gradients in the ionosphere using the Global Positioning System (GPS) and GLONASS (Russian global navigation system) observations, utilising data from multiple GPS stations in the vicinity of Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO). In previous work the ionosphere was characterised using a single-station to model the ionosphere as a single layer of fixed height and this was compared with ionospheric data derived from radio astronomy observations obtained from the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA). Having made improvements to our data quality (via cycle slip detection and repair) and incorporating data from the GLONASS system, we now present a multi-station approach. These two developments significantly improve our modelling of the ionosphere. We also explore the effects of a variable-height model. We conclude that modelling the small-scale features in the ionosphere that have been observed with the MWA will require a much denser network of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) stations than is currently available at the MRO.
  • We present Murchison Widefield Array observations of the supernova remnant (SNR) 1987A between 72 and 230 MHz, representing the lowest frequency observations of the source to date. This large lever arm in frequency space constrains the properties of the circumstellar medium created by the progenitor of SNR 1987A when it was in its red supergiant phase. As of late-2013, the radio spectrum of SNR 1987A between 72 MHz and 8.64 GHz does not show any deviation from a non-thermal power-law with a spectral index of $-0.74 \pm 0.02$. This spectral index is consistent with that derived at higher frequencies, beneath 100 GHz, and with a shock in its adiabatic phase. A spectral turnover due to free-free absorption by the circumstellar medium has to occur below 72 MHz, which places upper limits on the optical depth of $\leq$ 0.1 at a reference frequency of 72 MHz, emission measure of $\lesssim$ 13,000 cm$^{-6}$ pc, and an electron density of $\lesssim$ 110 cm$^{-3}$. This upper limit on the electron density is consistent with the detection of prompt radio emission and models of the X-ray emission from the supernova. The electron density upper limit implies that some hydrodynamic simulations derived a red supergiant mass loss rate that is too high, or a wind velocity that is too low. The mass loss rate of $\sim 5 \times 10^{-6}$ $M_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ and wind velocity of 10 km s$^{-1}$ obtained from optical observations are consistent with our upper limits, predicting a current turnover frequency due to free-free absorption between 5 and 60 MHz.
  • The GaLactic and Extragalactic All-sky MWA survey (GLEAM) is a new relatively low resolution, contiguous 72-231 MHz survey of the entire sky south of declination +25 deg. In this paper, we outline one approach to determine the relative contribution of system noise, classical confusion and sidelobe confusion in GLEAM images. An understanding of the noise and confusion properties of GLEAM is essential if we are to fully exploit GLEAM data and improve the design of future low-frequency surveys. Our early results indicate that sidelobe confusion dominates over the entire frequency range, implying that enhancements in data processing have the potential to further reduce the noise.
  • Context: Pre-merger interactions between galaxies can induce significant changes in the morphologies and kinematics of the stellar and ISM components. Large amounts of gas and stars are often found to be disturbed or displaced as tidal debris. This debris then evolves, sometimes forming stars and occasionally tidal dwarf galaxies. Here we present results from our HI study of Arp 65, an interacting pair hosting extended HI tidal debris. Aims: In an effort to understand the evolution of tidal debris produced by interacting pairs of galaxies, including in situ star and tidal dwarf galaxy formation, we are mapping HI in a sample of interacting galaxy pairs. The Arp 65 pair is one of them. Methods: Our resolved HI 21 cm line survey is being carried out using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). We used our HI survey data as well as available SDSS optical, Spitzer infra-red and GALEX UV data to study the evolution of the tidal debris and the correlation of HI with the star-forming regions within it. Results: In Arp 65 we see a high impact pre-merger interaction involving a pair of massive galaxies (NGC 90 and NGC 93) that have a stellar mass ratio of ~ 1:3. The interaction, which probably occurred ~ 1.0 -- 2.5 $\times$ 10$^8$ yr ago, appears to have displaced a large fraction of the HI in NGC 90 (including the highest column density HI) beyond its optical disk. We also find extended ongoing star formation in the outer disk of NGC 90. In the major star-forming regions, we find the HI column densities to be ~ 4.7 $\times$ 10$^{20}$ cm$^{-2}$ or lower. But no signature of star formation was found in the highest column density HI debris, SE of NGC 90. This indicates conditions within the highest column density HI debris remain hostile to star formation and it reaffirms that high HI column densities may be a necessary but not sufficient criterion for star formation.
  • We compare first order (refractive) ionospheric effects seen by the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) with the ionosphere as inferred from Global Positioning System (GPS) data. The first order ionosphere manifests itself as a bulk position shift of the observed sources across an MWA field of view. These effects can be computed from global ionosphere maps provided by GPS analysis centres, namely the Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE), using data from globally distributed GPS receivers. However, for the more accurate local ionosphere estimates required for precision radio astronomy applications, data from local GPS networks needs to be incorporated into ionospheric modelling. For GPS observations, the ionospheric parameters are biased by GPS receiver instrument delays, among other effects, also known as receiver Differential Code Biases (DCBs). The receiver DCBs need to be estimated for any non-CODE GPS station used for ionosphere modelling, a requirement for establishing dense GPS networks in arbitrary locations in the vicinity of the MWA. In this work, single GPS station-based ionospheric modelling is performed at a time resolution of 10 minutes. Also the receiver DCBs are estimated for selected Geoscience Australia (GA) GPS receivers, located at Murchison Radio Observatory (MRO1), Yarragadee (YAR3), Mount Magnet (MTMA) and Wiluna (WILU). The ionospheric gradients estimated from GPS are compared with the ionospheric gradients inferred from radio source position shifts observed with the MWA. The ionospheric gradients at all the GPS stations show a correlation with the gradients observed with the MWA. The ionosphere estimates obtained using GPS measurements show promise in terms of providing calibration information for the MWA.
  • We have carried out multiwavelength observations of the near-by ($z=0.046$) rich, merging galaxy cluster Abell 3376 with the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA). As a part of the GaLactic and Extragalactic All-sky MWA survey (GLEAM), this cluster was observed at 88, 118, 154, 188 and 215 MHz. The known radio relics, towards the eastern and western peripheries of the cluster, were detected at all the frequencies. The relics, with a linear extent of $\sim$ 1 Mpc each, are separated by $\sim$ 2 Mpc. Combining the current observations with those in the literature, we have obtained the spectra of these relics over the frequency range 80 -- 1400 MHz. The spectra follow power laws, with $\alpha$ = $-1.17\pm0.06$ and $-1.37\pm0.08$ for the west and east relics, respectively ($S \propto \nu^{\alpha}$). Assuming the break frequency to be near the lower end of the spectrum we estimate the age of the relics to be $\sim$ 0.4 Gyr. No diffuse radio emission from the central regions of the cluster (halo) was detected. The upper limit on the radio power of any possible halo that might be present in the cluster is a factor of 35 lower than that expected from the radio power and X-ray luminosity correlation for cluster halos. From this we conclude that the cluster halo is very extended ($>$ 500 kpc) and/or most of the radio emission from the halo has decayed. The current limit on the halo radio power is a factor of ten lower than the existing upper limits with possible implications for models of halo formation.
  • GLEAM, the GaLactic and Extragalactic All-sky MWA survey, is a survey of the entire radio sky south of declination +25 deg at frequencies between 72 and 231 MHz, made with the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) using a drift scan method that makes efficient use of the MWA's very large field-of-view. We present the observation details, imaging strategies and theoretical sensitivity for GLEAM. The survey ran for two years, the first year using 40 kHz frequency resolution and 0.5 s time resolution; the second year using 10 kHz frequency resolution and 2 s time resolution. The resulting image resolution and sensitivity depends on observing frequency, sky pointing and image weighting scheme. At 154 MHz the image resolution is approximately 2.5 x 2.2/cos(DEC+26.7) arcmin with sensitivity to structures up to ~10 deg in angular size. We provide tables to calculate the expected thermal noise for GLEAM mosaics depending on pointing and frequency and discuss limitations to achieving theoretical noise in Stokes I images. We discuss challenges, and their solutions, that arise for GLEAM including ionospheric effects on source positions and linearly polarised emission, and the instrumental polarisation effects inherent to the MWA's primary beam.
  • The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) is a new low-frequency interferometric radio telescope built in Western Australia at one of the locations of the future Square Kilometre Array (SKA). We describe the automated radio-frequency interference (RFI) detection strategy implemented for the MWA, which is based on the AOFlagger platform, and present 72-231-MHz RFI statistics from 10 observing nights. RFI detection removes 1.1% of the data. RFI from digital TV (DTV) is observed 3% of the time due to occasional ionospheric or atmospheric propagation. After RFI detection and excision, almost all data can be calibrated and imaged without further RFI mitigation efforts, including observations within the FM and DTV bands. The results are compared to a previously published Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) RFI survey. The remote location of the MWA results in a substantially cleaner RFI environment compared to LOFAR's radio environment, but adequate detection of RFI is still required before data can be analysed. We include specific recommendations designed to make the SKA more robust to RFI, including: the availability of sufficient computing power for RFI detection; accounting for RFI in the receiver design; a smooth band-pass response; and the capability of RFI detection at high time and frequency resolution (second and kHz-scale respectively).
  • We present results from our Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) HI observations of the interacting pair Arp 202 (NGC 2719 and NGC 2719A). Earlier deep UV(GALEX) observations of this system revealed a tidal tail like extension with a diffuse object towards its end, proposed as a tidal dwarf galaxy (TDG) candidate. We detect HI emission from the Arp 202 system, including HI counterparts for the tidal tail and the TDG candidate. Our GMRT HI morphological and kinematic results clearly link the HI tidal tail and the HI TDG counterparts to the interaction between NGC 2719 and NGC 2719A, thus strengthening the case for the TDG. The Arp 202 TDG candidate belongs to a small group of TDG candidates with extremely blue colours. In order to gain a better understanding of this group we carried out a comparative study of their properties from the available data. We find that HI (and probably stellar) masses of this extremely blue group are similar to the lowest HI mass TDGs in the literature. However the number of such blue TDG candidates examined so far is too small to conclude whether or not their properties justify them to be considered as a subgroup of TDGs.
  • We have observed the DEEP2 galaxies using the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope in the frequency band of 610 MHz. There are $\simeq 400$ galaxies in the redshift range $1.24 < z < 1.36$ and within the field of view $\simeq 44'$, of the GMRT dishes. We have coadded the HI 21 cm-line emissions at the locations of these DEEP2 galaxies. We apply stacking on three different data cubes: primary beam uncorrected, primary beam corrected (uniform weighing ) and primary beam corrected (optimal weighing). We obtain a peak signal strength in the range $8\hbox{--}25 \, \rm \mu$Jy/beam for a velocity width in the range $270\hbox{--} 810 \, \rm km \, sec^{-1}$. The error on the signal, computed by bootstrapping, lies in the range $2.5\hbox{--}6 \, \rm \mu$Jy/beam, implying a 2.5--4.7-$\sigma$ detection of the signal at $z \simeq 1.3$. We compare our results with N-body simulations of the signal at $z\simeq 1$ and find reasonable agreement. We also discuss the impact of residual continuum and systematics.
  • We present results from GMRT HI 21 cm line observations of the interacting galaxy pair Arp 181 (NGC 3212 and NGC 3215) at z =0.032. We find almost all of the detected HI (90%) displaced well beyond the optical disks of the pair with the highest density HI located ~70 kpc west of the pair. An HI bridge extending between the optical pair and the bulk of the HI together with their HI deficiencies provide strong evidence that the interaction between the pair has removed most of their HI to the current projected position. HI to the west of the pair has two approximately equal intensity peaks. The HI intensity maximum furthest to the west coincides with a small spiral companion SDSS J102726.32+794911.9 which shows enhanced mid-infrared (Spitzer), UV (GALEX) and H alpha emission indicating intense star forming activity. The HI intensity maximum close to the Arp 181 pair, coincides with a diffuse optical cloud detected in UV (GALEX) at the end of the stellar and HI tidal tails originating at NGC 3212 and, previously proposed to be a tidal dwarf galaxy in formation. Future sensitive HI surveys by telescopes like ASKAP should prove to be powerful tools for identifying tidal dwarfs at moderate to large redshifts to explore in detail the evolution of dwarf galaxies in the Universe.
  • We present neutral hydrogen (H{\sc i}) observations with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope ({\it GMRT}) of the interacting galaxies NGC5996 and NGC5994, which make up the Arp72 system. Arp72 is an M51-type system and shows a complex distribution of H{\sc i} tails and a bridge due to tidal interactions. H{\sc i} column densities ranging from 0.8$-1.8\times10^{20}$ atoms cm$^{-2}$ in the eastern tidal tail to 1.7$-2\times10^{21}$ atoms cm$^{-2}$ in the bridge connecting the two galaxies, are seen to be associated with star-forming regions. We discuss the morphological and kinematic similarities of Arp72 with M51, the archetypal example of the M51-type systems, and Arp86, another M51-type system studied with the {\it GMRT}, and suggest that a multiple passage model of Salo & Laurikainen may be preferred over the classical single passage model of Toomre & Toomre, to reproduce the H{\sc i} features in Arp72 as well as in other M-51 systems depicting similar optical and H{\sc i} features.
  • We have formed a new sample which consists of extended extragalactic radio sources without obvious active galactic nuclei (AGN) in them. Most of these sources appear to be dead double radio sources. These sources with steep spectra ($\alpha < $ -1.8; S $\propto \nu^{\alpha}$) were identified using the 74 (VLSS) and the 1400 MHz (NVSS) surveys and further imaged using the Very Large Array (VLA) and the Giant Meterwave RadioTelescope (GMRT). The radio morphologies of these sources are rather unusual in the sense that no obvious cores and jets are detected in these sources, but, two extended lobes are detected in most. The mean redshift of 4 of the 10 sources reported here is $\sim$ 0.2. At a redshift of 0.2, the linear extents of the sources in the current sample are $\sim$ 250 kpc with their spectral luminosities at 1.4 GHz in the range 2-25 x 10$^{23}$ W Hz$^{-1}$. The steep spectra of these sources is a result of the cessation of AGN activities in them about 15 -- 100 million years ago. Before the cessation of AGN activity, the radio luminosities of these galaxies were $\sim$ 1000 times brighter than their current luminosities and would have been comparable to those of the brightest active radio galaxies detected in the local universe (L$_{1.4} \sim$ 10$^{27}$ W Hz$^{-1}$). The dead radio galaxies reported here represent the $'$tip of the iceberg$'$ and quantifying the abundance of such a population has important implications to the life cycle of the AGN.
  • We present the results of Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) observations of the interacting system Arp86 in both neutral atomic hydrogen, HI, and in radio continuum at 240, 606 and 1394 MHz. In addition to HI emission from the two dominant galaxies, NGC7752 and NGC7753, these observations show a complex distribution of HI tails and bridges due to tidal interactions. The regions of highest column density appear related to the recent sites of intense star formation. HI column densities $\sim1-$1.5 $\times10^{21}$ cm$^{-2}$ have been detected in the tidal bridge which is bright in Spitzer image as well. We also detect HI emission from the galaxy 2MASX J23470758+2926531, which is shown to be a part of this system. We discuss the possibility that this could be a tidal dwarf galaxy. The radio continuum observations show evidence of a non-thermal bridge between NGC7752 and NGC7753, and a radio source in the nuclear region of NGC7753 consistent with it having a LINER nucleus.
  • Environment plays an important role in the evolution of the gas contents of galaxies. Gas deficiency of cluster spirals and the role of the hot intracluster medium (ICM) in stripping gas from these galaxies is a well studied subject. Loose groups with diffuse X-ray emmision from the intragroup medium (IGM) offer an intermediate environment between clusters and groups without a hot IGM. These X-ray bright groups have smaller velocity dispersion and lower temperature than clusters, but higher IGM density than loose groups without diffuse X-ray emission. A single dish comparative study of loose groups with and without diffuse X-ray emission from the IGM, showed that the galaxies in X-ray bright groups have lost more gas on average than the galaxies in non X-ray bright groups. In this paper we present GMRT HI observations of 13 galaxies from 4 X-ray bright groups: NGC5044, NGC720, NGC1550 and IC1459. The aim of this work is to study the morphology of HI in these galaxies and to see if the hot IGM has in any way affected their HI content or distribution. In addition to disturbed HI morphology, we find that most galaxies have shrunken HI disks compared to the field spirals. This indicates that IGM assisted stripping processes like ram pressure may have stripped gas from the outer edges of the galaxies.